Navigation – Plan du site

High shell deposition of the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774) on alluvial bars: exploratory investigations and biogeomorphological research perspectives

Dépôts massifs de coquilles du mollusque invasif Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774) sur les bancs alluviaux : observations exploratoires et perspectives de recherche en biogéomorphologie
Dov Corenblit, Frederic Julien, Johannes Steiger, José Darrozes et Benoit Mialet
p. 153-164

Résumés

Le mollusque aquatique d’eau douce C. fluminea s’est répandu à travers le Monde depuis environ quatre-vingt ans. En raison d’une faible compétition interspécifique en dehors de son aire d’extension originelle, ce mollusque produit souvent de grandes quantités de coquilles dans les cours d’eau envahis. Ces coquilles se déposent sur les bancs alluviaux lors des crues, induisant potentiellement des modifications du fonctionnement géomorphologique et écologique de la zone riveraine. A partir d’observations entreprises sur la moyenne Garonne, nous suggérons que dans les hydrosystèmes fluviaux envahis, et à certains emplacements sur les bancs alluviaux, C. fluminea représente potentiellement un nouveau facteur de construction de l’habitat riverain et de modification des propriétés physicochimiques locales du substrat. Nous suggérons que les coquilles déposées peuvent être utilisées comme des marqueurs biogéochimiques de plusieurs éléments, par exemple les métaux lourds, et comme des bio-marqueurs géomorphologiques pour l’étude de l’évolution récente des plaines d’inondation et des taux de sédimentation au sein du lit mineur.

Haut de page

Notes de la rédaction

Article soumis le 18 octobre 2012, accepté le 16 décembre 2012.

Texte intégral

Introduction

1The freshwater bivalve C. fluminea (fig. 1A), native to Southeast Asia, has extended its geographical range in the last eighty years to many rivers in Oceania, Africa, America and Europe (Karatayev et al., 2005). It has been clearly demonstrated that the mollusc can attain very high population densities within invaded river channels, canals, and lakes around the World (tab. 1). This mollusc currently accounts for significant annual increases in the biomass of invaded systems (Boltovskoy et al., 1995). At the global scale, C. fluminea is considered to be one of the most successful invasive species colonising new and currently uninvaded aquatic systems (Darrigran, 2002; McMahon, 2002; Sousa et al., 2008a). On the North American subcontinent, this mollusc was first recorded in 1938 (Burch, 1944; McMahon, 1982; Marsh, 1985) and is now observed in most of its rivers, canals, and lakes (Sinclair, 1971; Britton and Morton, 1979) as well as in many South American freshwater systems (Ituarte, 1981; Cataldo and Boltovskoy, 1999; Mouthon, 2001). C. Dubois and J.-N. Tourenq (1995) have shown that C. fluminea has only occurred in Western Europe since the beginning of the 1980s. J. Mouthon (1981) noted that first appearances of C. fluminea in Europe were located in France and Portugal, in the estuaries of the rivers Dordogne and Tagus, respectively, before it spread to most of the Western European countries, e.g. The Netherlands (Blanken, 1990), Germany (Kinzelbach, 1991), Spain (Araujo et al., 1993) and Belgium (Swinnen et al., 1998). Within only twenty years, C. fluminea has succeeded in colonising the four main hydrographical basins of France, particularly the rivers Garonne, Rhône, Loire, and Seine (Mouthon, 2001; Vincent and Brancotte, 2000; Brancotte and Vincent, 2002; Marescaux et al., 2010). C. fluminea is currently identified in the Delivering Alien Invasive Species Inventories for Europe (DAISIE database: http://www.europe-aliens.org/​default.do) as one of the most invasive species in Europe.

2Several scientific reports (for an exhaustive bibliography, see Clement, 2006) have been dedicated to the specific life cycle and population dynamics of this invasive mollusc (e.g., Lauritsen and Mozley, 1989; Sousa et al., 2008 a and b). R.F. McMahon (2002) suggested that the invasive success of C. fluminea could be related to its high tolerance of a wide range of habitat conditions, a high degree of fertility and a young maturity age. A study on the Canal du Midi, located in the vicinity of the study sites, in the SW of France, reported by C. Dubois and J.-N. Tourenq (1995), showed that a single adult mollusc of C. fluminea produces 34,000 to 48,000 juveniles per year (up to 2000 per day during the reproduction period). Observations undertaken by the authors during the year 2004 on the Garonne River, near the confluence with the Tarn River, are consistent with these findings and indicate a period of high production concentrated between May and August, with a peak in June (fig. 2). This ruderal (i.e., r-strategy) reproductive strategy implies a very high mortality during the first year. C. Dubois (1995) estimated that the mortality in the first year is approximately 99%. However, a relevant proportion of individuals survive each year, leading to a very high shell density per square metre within river channels (tab. 1). For example, 100 individuals located in one square metre of a river channel – which represents a low value within invaded systems (tab. 1) – can produce approximately 200,000 descendants in a day, with a probable success in reaching maturity for 2000 individuals. Therefore, in many muddy rivers around the World, C. fluminea currently dominates the benthic invertebrate community in terms of abundance (Lauritsen and Mozley, 1989; Poff et al., 1993; Hakenkamp and Palmer, 1999).

3C. fluminea is an important filterer of phytoplankton from the water column and potentially of suspended particular matter (Lauritsen, 1986; Leff et al., 1990; Boltovsky et al., 1995). Consequently, the mollusc significantly impacts organic matter cycling in both the streambed and the overlying water column (Reid et al., 1992; Hakenkamp and Palmer, 1999). It transforms detritus into biomass and produces large amounts of CaCO3 by collecting Ca and HCO3 from its environment. Shell production rates of this mollusc may reach 50-1000 g CaCO3 m-2 a-1 (Chase, 1999 a and b; McMahon and Bogan, 2001). As J.L. Gutierrez et al. (2003) noted, considering that mineral sedimentation rates in estuaries are estimated to be 1-3 mm/a, CaCO3 deposits of 0.02 mm/a to 0.35 mm/a by C. fluminea have to be considered as very significant. In general, bivalves such as C. fluminea are slow-growing and long-lived (approximately 4-5 years according to D.J. Hornbach, 1992 and D. Cataldo and D. Boltovskoy, 1999) and have a low susceptibility to predation (Neves and Odum, 1989). P. Schwinghammer (1981) pointed to the fact that shells are to be considered as a biomass sink. Shells of C. fluminea deposited along river margins potentially persist over geological timescales when mechanical breakage and chemical dissolution are negligible (Powell et al., 1989; Kidwell, 1991).

4The mollusc has recently been defined as an “ecosystem engineer” (Gutierrez et al., 2003). An engineer species is considered to be a species that directly or indirectly controls other species’ dynamics by causing physical state changes in the habitat (Jones et al., 1994). J.L. Gutierrez et al. (2003) and S. Werner and K.O. Rothhaupt (2008) indeed noted that shell production by C. fluminea considerably increases micro-habitat heterogeneity and availability of valuable hard surfaces within aquatic systems for other aquatic species that prefer structured habitats, especially in unstructured soft-bottomed channels. Furthermore, shells tend to be removed, transported and deposited on river margins during floods because the preferential substrate of living C. fluminea in natural river channels is generally composed of non-cohesive fine sediment (Belanger et al., 1985; Bachmann et al., 1997; Schmidlin and Baur, 2007). So far, shells of molluscs have not explicitly been considered as modulating geomorphic landform structures (e.g., alluvial bars, banks) within riverine systems.

5The objective of this preliminary investigation is to enhance research at the interface between hydrogeomorphology and hydroecology relating to the biogeomorphic impacts of C. fluminea within the riparian system. We test our hypothesis that the expansion of C.  fluminea populations during the last thirty years within the channel of the Garonne River, France (Dubois, 1995), has resulted in the deposition of high quantities of shells at the immediate margins of the water channel (i.e., on alluvial bars). We suggest that these deposits are potentially sufficient to modify geomorphological and ecological properties of river margins. We further suggest that in certain cases deposited shells may be used as a biochemical marker for water temperature (Bucci et al., 2009), for several elements, such as heavy metals (Fichez et al., 2005), and as a geomorphic biomarker for studying recent floodplain evolution and associated in-channel sedimentation rates. We discuss the deposition pattern on the alluvial bar and suggest future biogeomorphological protocols for in situ and laboratory quantitative analyses.

Fig. 1 – Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774).
Fig. 1 – Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774).

Fig. 1 – Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774). Fig. 1 – Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774).

A: The shell tint is generally clear, light yellow or yellow-green. These colours can flake with time leaving white spots. The shell colour on the inside is light purple. The shell shape is relatively round and of equal length and height. The shell diameter of the adult individual generally reaches 10 mm, with the biggest individuals sometimes growing up to 50 mm. B: Photographs showing deposited shells of C. fluminea on Site 2 with a surface density estimated to be approximately 8 000 shells/m2. C: Photographs showing mixtures of shells and sands in the subsurface, at a depth of a maximum of 40 cm.
A : La teinte de la coquille est généralement claire, jaune pâle ou tirant vers le jaune-vert. Ces couleurs peuvent s’altérer avec le temps, laissant apparaître des zones blanches. La couleur à l’intérieur de la coquille est violet-clair. Ca forme est arrondie, avec une largeur et une hauteur équivalentes. Le diamètre moyen des coquilles des individus adultes est d’environ 10 mm, avec parfois des pics à 50 mm. B : Photographie montrant un dépôt de coquilles de C. fluminea sur le Site 2 avec une densité de recouvrement estimée approximativement à 8 000 coquilles/m². C : Photographie montrant un mélange sub-surfacique de coquilles et de sables à une profondeur de 40 cm.

Fig. 2 – Number of individual bivalve larvae (mainly C. fluminea) per second crossing the Garonne channel section near the confluence with the Tarn River.
Fig. 2 – Nombre d’individus larvaires de bivalves (principalement C. fluminea) par seconde traversant une section de chenal de la Garonne près de la confluence avec le Tarn.

Fig. 2 – Number of individual bivalve larvae (mainly C. fluminea) per second crossing the Garonne channel section near the confluence with the Tarn River. Fig. 2 – Nombre d’individus larvaires de bivalves (principalement C. fluminea) par seconde traversant une section de chenal de la Garonne près de la confluence avec le Tarn.

The values where defined each month by filtrating 50 l of water.
Les valeurs ont été définies tous les mois de l’année 2004 via la filtration de 5  l d’eau.

Tab. 1 – Examples of reported densities of C. fluminea in aquatic systems (rivers, canals, lakes, and deltas) on the European and the American continents.
Tab. 1 – Exemples de densités de C. fluminea relevées dans des systèmes aquatiques (rivières, canaux, lacs et deltas) sur les continents européen et américain.

Aquatic system and location

Mean annual density of adults

>10 mm

(shell m-2)

Punctual values of density of juveniles

and/or adults

(shell m-2)

Reference

American continent

Lower delta of the River Parana, Argentina

300-1,000

1,720

Cataldo and Boltovskoy (1999)

Lower delta of the River Parana, Argentina

1,070

10,300

Boltovskoy et al. (1995); Cataldo and Boltovskoy (1999)

Rio de la Plata, Argentina

500-1,000

-

Darrigran (2002)

Potomac River Estuary near Washington, D.C., USA

2,500

-

Dresler and Cory (1980); Cohen et al. (1984); Phelps (1985)

St. Clair River, Michigan, USA

380-1,500

2,150-4,545

French and Schloesser (1991)

River Goose Creek, Virginia, USA

-

1,370

Hakenkamp and Palmer (1999)

Earthen canal in the Phoenix metropolitan area, central Arizona, USA

2,255

9,988

Marsh (1985)

Mendota Canal, California, USA

-

20,000

Prokopovich (1969)

Central Arizona Canal, USA

-

10,000

Marsh (1985)

Tidal freshwater portion of the Potomac River, Maryland, USA

-

670

Dresler and Cory (1980)

European continent

River Seine at Melun, Northern France

-

80-100

Chevallier (2000); Brancotte

and Vincent (2002)

River Charente at Balzac, France

-

150

Chevallier (2000)

River Altrhein, downstream of Basel, France

-

200−600

Schmidlin and Baur (2007)

Lateral Canal, South-Western France

70-100

710

Dubois and Tourenq (1995)

de Huningue Canal, downstream of Basel, France

-

10−50

Schmidlin and Baur (2007)

Lake Maxe, France

2,000-3,000

-

Brancotte and Vincent (2002)

River Saone at Lyon, Eastern France

160-475

930

Mouthon (2001)

River Minho estuary, Iberian Peninsula, Portugal

520-1,320

4 000

Sousa et al. (2008a,b)

Lake Constance near the city of Bregenz, Austria

-

1,227-27,563

Werner and Rothhaupt (2008)

Material and methods

6In order to evaluate the extent to which shells of C. fluminea could be considered as a renewable carbonated sediment source contributing to riparian habitat construction and transformation, a shell abundance survey was undertaken in June 2009 on five alluvial bars of the channelised section of the Garonne River (Steiger et al., 1998, 2000), between the cities of Toulouse (43°36’32’’N; 1°24’45’’E; 132 m a.s.l.) and Verdun-sur-Garonne (43°51’17’’N; 1°14’35’’E; 95 m a.s.l.). The reach length is 35 km, the mean annual discharge 200 m3/s, the mean channel width 150 m, the mean channel slope >0.001 m/m, the mean coefficient of sinuosity 1.3, and the catchment surface is 31,000 km2. We investigated qualitatively alluvial bars with roughly similar biogeomorphological characteristics (fig. 3), corresponding to point bars of approximately 400-500 m length and 80 m width, partly colonised by ligneous riparian vegetation (mainly Populus nigra L.). In February 2010, during winter, low water discharges, a second semi-quantitative shell abundance survey was carried out on one of the five alluvial bars (site S2; fig. 3 and fig. 4A). Surface abundance (i.e., quantity of shells) was visually estimated within squared plots of 1x1 m located along transverse transects across the alluvial bar perpendicular to the main channel (distance between transects: 10 m; distance between plots: 3 m; a total of 47 transects and 805 plots; fig. 4B). The visual estimation of the samples was adapted from a J. Braun-Blanquet (1964) 6-point scale of abundance and dominance. The approximate number of shells corresponding to each of the Braun-Blanquet point scale was estimated in 6 plots related to the 6-point scale of Braun-Blanquet. 10 randomly distributed sub-samples of 10 cm2 per plot (a total of 60 sub-samples) were used for counting the number of shells according to each of the 6-point scale (fig. 1B). The spatial distribution of shell abundance was mapped using GIS (MapInfoTM v. 8.0) based on a thematic analysis (IDW interpolation).

Fig. 3 – Study reach on the Garonne River, south-western France, between Toulouse and Verdun-sur-Garonne (35 km).
Fig. 3 – Secteur d’étude sur le fleuve Garonne, Sud-ouest de la France, entre Toulouse et Verdun-sur-Garonne (35 km).

Fig. 3 – Study reach on the Garonne River, south-western France, between Toulouse and Verdun-sur-Garonne (35 km). Fig. 3 – Secteur d’étude sur le fleuve Garonne, Sud-ouest de la France, entre Toulouse et Verdun-sur-Garonne (35 km).

Observations were undertaken on alluvial bars S1 to S5, which possess similar biogeomorphological properties: size (400-600-m long and 100-m wide), partially covered by riparian vegetation, and the presence of a chute channel.
Les observations ont été effectuées sur les bancs alluviaux S1 à S5 possédants des caractéristiques biogéomorphologiques équivalentes : taille (400-600 m de long et 100 m de large), partiellement recouverts de végétation riveraine et avec la présence d’un chenal de secondaire de chute.

Fig. 4 – Data.
Fig. 4 – Données.

Fig. 4 – Data. Fig. 4 – Données.

A: Alluvial bar S2 (aerial photographs, date: 2002) where a high-resolution survey of surface shell densities was conducted. B: Location of transects with location of sampling plots and geomorphological units (situation in 2009). C: Interpolated map with six classes of shell densities; the location and direction (arrow) of the photographs corresponding to fig. 5 are indicated in the map.
A : Banc alluvial S2 (photographie aérienne ; date : 2002) sur lequel la densité de coquilles en surface a été mesurée avec une haute définition. B : Localisation des transects, des quadrats de mesure et des unités géomorphologiques (situation en 2009). C : Carte d’interpolation avec six classes de densité de recouvrement ; la localisation et la direction (flèches) des photographies correspondants à la fig. 5 sont indiquées sur la carte.

Results and discussion

7High quantities of C. fluminea shells were deposited in specific locations on four of the five alluvial bars we investigated, i.e. in 80% of the sampled bars. Complementary observations indicated that the shells were generally incorporated in the sediment sub-surface (fig. 1C). Fig. 4C delimits the main areas of the alluvial bar, where high densities of shell surface-deposits were found during the shell abundance survey on site 2, mainly: (i) on alluvial bar tails and downstream the chute channel (fig. 5A and B); (ii) within or at the immediate margins of the chute channel (fig. 5A and B); (iii) upstream and downstream within the margins of riparian vegetation patches (fig. 5C), and locally, immediately downstream of individual pioneer plants (fig. 5D). The mean shell density per square metre calculated from the 805 observations was 810 shells/m2 ± 2100 sd (standard deviation). Surface cover with densities >1500 shells/m2 was found at 40% of the total surface of the alluvial bar, i.e. 8820 m2 out of a total area of 21,696 m2 (fig. 4C). At the micro-scale (i.e., approx. 0.1 m2 to 10 m2) within these locations, we observed depositional landforms mainly consisting of a mixture of shells and sand.

8Analogous to the spatial variability of sediment deposits related to the variability of water flow properties (e.g., Rice et al., 2009), the observed spatial depositional pattern of shells on the studied alluvial bar certainly needs to be related to hydrodynamic contrasts corresponding to changes of local flow velocity and water height over the alluvial bars during flood events. The areas with preferential deposition of shells mainly corresponded to areas of low elevation, where fine and coarse sand (texture <2 mm) were deposited. Conversely, areas dominated by cobbles or gravels on the bar head and in median positions of the bar within the immediate margins of the main channel generally did not show significant quantities of shells (generally <100 shells/m2). However, at this stage this first observation remains qualitative and thus quantitative spatial-explicit analyses will need to be undertaken to establish the correlation between surface sediment grain size and shell abundance. The highly aggraded and densely vegetated zones of the alluvial bar, perched approximately 1 to 2 m above low water levels and being less exposed to annual flooding, generally did not contain any shells at the surface. This observation suggests that, unlike silt and clay, which are commonly trapped within these locations, shells are less likely to be deposited during annual floods on high topographic levees of the alluvial bars. It seems likely that shells are only rarely transported in suspension during annual floods on the Garonne River. They preferentially deposit on the lowest topographic areas of the alluvial bars, indicating sliding and saltation as dominating transport processes.

9Our preliminary research indicates that in certain freshwater and brackish water ecosystems contemporary successful invasion dynamics of C. fluminea may produce rapid, significant and potentially permanent riparian habitat changes at the aquatic-terrestrial interface. C. fluminea may also significantly contribute to alluvial bar accretion at the local scale within invaded rivers, particularly in those areas of the riparian zone that show the strongest hydrological connection. Within certain locations of these areas, a progressively modified habitat made up of a mixture of shells and mineral sediments is being created (fig. 5).

Fig. 5 – Depositional forms constituted by shells of C. fluminea on alluvial bars of the River Garonne (example of S2).
Fig. 5 – Formes de dépôts constituées par des coquilles de C. fluminea sur les bancs alluviaux de la Garonne (exemple du S2).

Fig. 5 – Depositional forms constituted by shells of C. fluminea on alluvial bars of the River Garonne (example of S2). Fig. 5 – Formes de dépôts constituées par des coquilles de C. fluminea sur les bancs alluviaux de la Garonne (exemple du S2).

A: On a tail of point bar. B: On the margins of chute channel on the tail of the alluvial bar. C: At the shelter of external limits of pioneer riparian forest. D: Downstream individual herbaceous plants. See fig. 3C for location. Photographs: D. Corenblit, 2009.
A : Sur une portion aval du banc de convexité. B : Sur la marge du chenal de chute en aval du banc alluvial. C : À l’abri au sein de la limite extérieure de la forêt pionnière riveraine. D : En aval d’individus herbacés. Localisation in fig. 3C.

Photographies : D. Corenblit, 2009.

Research perspectives

10High shell deposition by the mollusc C. fluminea presents an opportunity for biogeomorphologists to quantify the spatiotemporal range and intensity of the phenomenon of fluvial habitat construction in a variety of invaded rivers with different hydrogeomorphological and bioclimatic conditions. An important aspect is estimating the deposition pattern of shells (i.e., surface cover, density and biomass) on alluvial bars in relation to the flow regime (including floods) and the initial topography and roughness of the alluvial surface. Such spatially-explicit analyses will help to understand shell deposition dynamics in relation to topography, vegetation cover, flood frequency, duration and timing. Sediment traps (e.g., artificial grass mats; J. Steiger et al., 2003) may be used in situ to experimentally quantify shell deposition and associated mineral sediment texture. In parallel, population dynamics of C. fluminea (number of larvae in the water column and adults on the channel bed) should be recurrently monitored in the river channel (fig. 2). This will be the first step in determining whether the annual rate of shell deposition on alluvial bars can be directly correlated with the annual rate of shell production within the river channel or if the drivers of shell deposition are more complex.

11In addition, controlled flume experiments are needed to gain a more in-depth mechanical understanding of shell transport processes of C. fluminea and to define (i) critical shear stress displacements, (ii) transportation modalities in the water column, and (iii) deposition thresholds related to varying shell diameters and density, water heights, turbidity and flow velocities. A Shields entrainment function (or a similar equation; see Beheshti and Ataie-Ashtiani, 2008) approach is likely to be suitable, with θcr = τc / [(ρsρ)gd], wherein τc is the critical bottom shear stress, ρs and ρ are the densities of sediment (or shell) and fluid, respectively, g is the acceleration due to gravity and d is the particle diameter (Shields, 1936). One fundamental question is how shell shape and low density influence these results. Answering this question may also help answer critical questions such as the persistence/residence time of shells on alluvial bars in relation to the natural flow regime. However, our observations on the Garonne River indicate that herbaceous and woody pioneer riparian vegetation generally colonises the shell-covered surfaces within a few years, inhibiting or at least significantly decreasing shell remobilisation during low to moderate floods. Consequently, the effects of vegetation colonising shell deposition sites and their quantification also represent a future challenge for biogeomorphologists.

12Protocols designed for experiments in flumes will permit the determination of residence times of whole shells in river channels and the mechanical resistance of shells to breakage and abrasion during transportation by water. The critical question of calcium carbonate dissolution also has to be addressed, in order to determine destruction rates of shells through dissolution processes in different physicochemical conditions. Dissolution rates can be estimated experimentally in situ using buried bags containing calibrated shells, which are later collected. Dissolution rates can be estimated for specific river sections in situ by collecting and dating buried shells and establishing the ratio between shell size and weight; this ratio decreases according to the carbonate dissolution of the shell. The approximate timing of shell deposition can be estimated on the basis of the alluvial bar formation. The age of the bar in turn can be determined using diachronic aerial photograph analysis and completed through dendrochronology of established cottonwood and willow cohorts.

13Furthermore, the detailed analysis of growth rings of individual shells deposited in the river is crucial for the quantification of annual and sub-annual shell growth patterns and their correlation with the hydrological regime and water temperatures. We suggest that concentrations of several elements (e.g., Sr/Ca, heavy metals) can be detected using micro-chemical analysis (ICP-MS, using laser ablation) and it is hypothesised that stable isotope (16O/18O) analyses can be used to retrace water temperatures over the life cycle of individual molluscs. As pointed out by M. Weitere et al. (2009), these analyses shall help to understand how global warming and environmental change have driven spatial-temporal effects on the invasive dynamics of C. fluminea and ultimately on the modification of old and the creation of new riverine habitats.

14We suggest that shell deposits of C. fluminea could be used as a new biomarker for studying recent floodplain evolution and associated in-channel and overbank sedimentation rates in many cases. Current methods for determining floodplain sedimentation rates include the use of natural radioisotopes, e.g. 210Pb (Aalto et al., 2003) or man-made radioisotopes, e.g. 137Cs (Walling and He, 1997). It may be possible to use buried shells of C. fluminea as a natural marker horizon for determining subsequent sediment sequestration over short timescales and to study the contemporary (<100 years) geomorphologic development of floodplains of river systems colonised by C. fluminea around the World. However, this will only be possible in rivers in which the dates of appearance and upstream propagation of the molluscs have been well defined and invasion dynamics are sufficiently well documented, e.g. in many European and North- and South-American river systems (tab. 1).

Fig. 6 – Proposed research methodologies and tools for studying shell deposition in river channel margins and effects on fluvial landform dynamics and riparian ecosystem processes.
Fig. 6 – Propositions de méthodes et d’outils pour l’étude des dépôts de coquilles dans le chenal et sur les marges des cours d’eau et l'étude des effets sur la dynamique des formes fluviales et sur le fonctionnement écologique de la zone riveraine.

Fig. 6 – Proposed research methodologies and tools for studying shell deposition in river channel margins and effects on fluvial landform dynamics and riparian ecosystem processes.Fig. 6 – Propositions de méthodes et d’outils pour l’étude des dépôts de coquilles dans le chenal et sur les marges des cours d’eau et l'étude des effets sur la dynamique des formes fluviales et sur le fonctionnement écologique de la zone riveraine.

15In conclusion, we point to the opportunity for biogeomorphologists to study contemporary fluvial landform and riparian habitat changes caused by a highly invasive freshwater mollusc, C. fluminea, in relation with current climate and environmental changes. Because of the particular nature of mollusc shells with respect to sand, gravel and cobbles originally transported and deposited by the Garonne River, the evolving textural, structural and chemical characteristics of the new substrate on the alluvial bars are possibly accompanied by changes of the ecological structure (e.g., vegetation composition and succession dynamics; macro-invertebrates) and functioning (e.g., biochemical and nutrient cycles) of the riverine system. Future research on invaded rivers, as suggested here (fig. 6), may lead to a fuller understanding of the structural and functional biogeomorphological changes caused by an exotic ecosystem engineer and contribute to the development of new tools for analysing river chemistry and contemporary sediment dynamics.

This work was supported by the French research project “Waters & Territories. GALE&T – Garonne, Allier, Eaux & Territoires”, financed by the French Ministry of Ecology and the French National Centre of Scientific Research (CNRS). We thank S. Lühmann for English proofreading of the manuscript and the two anonymous reviewers for their relevant comments, which contributed to improve this article.

Haut de page

Bibliographie

Aalto R., Maurice-Bourgoin L., Dunne T., Montgomery D.R., Nittrouer C.A., Guyot J.L. (2003) – Episodic sediment accumulation on Amazonian flood plains influenced by El Niño/Souther Oscillation. Nature 425, 493-497.

Araujo R., Moreno D., Ramos A. (1993) – The Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774) (Bivalvia: Corbiculidae) in Europe. American Malacological Bulletin 10, 39-49.

Bachmann V., Usseglio-Polatera P., Cegielka E., Wagner P., Poinsant J.F., Moreteau J.C. (1997) – Premières observations sur la coexistence de Dreissena polymorpha, Corophium curvispinum et Corbicula spp. dans la rivière Moselle. Bulletin Français de la Pêche et de la Pisciculture, 344/345, 373-384.

Beheshti A.A., Ataie-Ashtiani B. (2008) – Analysis of Threshold and Incipient Conditions for Sediment Movement. Coastal Engineering 55, 423-430.

Belanger S.C., Farris J.L., Cherry D.S., Cairns J.Jr. (1985) – Sediment preference of the freshwater Asiatic clam, Corbicula fluminea. The Nautilus 99, 66-73.

Blanken E. (1990)Corbicula fluminalis Müller, 1774 nieuw in Nederland. Correspondentieblad van de Nederlandse Malacologische Vereniging 252, 631-632.

Boltovskoy D., Izaguirre I., Correa N. (1995) – Feeding selectivity of Corbicula fluminea (Bivalvia) on natural phytoplankton. Hydrobiologia 312, 171-182.

Brancotte V., Vincent T. (2002) – L’invasion du réseau hydrographique Français par les mollusques Corbicula spp. Modalité de colonisation et rôle prépondérant des canaux de navigation. Bulletin Français de la Pêche et de la Pisciculture, 365/366, 325-337.

Braun-Blanquet J. (1964)Pflanzensoziologie (3rd edition). Springer Verlag, Wien, New-York, 865 p.

Britton J.C., Morton B. (1979) – Corbicula in North America: the evidence reviewed and evaluated. In Britton J.C., Mattice J.S., Murphy C.E., Newland L.W. (Eds.): Proc. 1st Int. Corbicula Symp. Texas Christian University Research Foundation, Fort Worth, 249-287.

Bucci J.P., Showers W.J., Genna B, Levine J.F. (2009) – Stable oxygen and carbon isotope profiles in a an invasive bivalve (Corbicula fluminea) in North Carolina watersheds. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 73, 3234-3247.

Burch J.Q. (1944) – Checklist of West American mollusks, family Corbiculidae. Minutes of the Conchological Club of Southern California 38, 18.

Cataldo D., Boltovskoy D. (1999) – Population dynamics of Corbicula fluminea (Bivalvia) in the Parana River Delta (Argentina). Hydrobiologia 380, 153-163.

Chase M.E., Bailey R.C. (1999a) The ecology of the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) in the Lower Great Lakes of North America: I. Population dynamics and growth. Journal of Great Lakes Research 25, 107-121.

Chase M.E., Bailey R.C. (1999b) The ecology of the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) in the Lower Great Lakes of North America: II. Total production, energy allocation, and reproductive effort. Journal of Great Lakes Research 25, 122-134.

Chevallier H. (2000) – Taxonomie des Corbicula (Bivalvia : Corbiculidae) introduites dans le sud-ouest de la France. Vertigo 7, 15-21.

Clement L. (2006)Corbicula, an annotated bibliography. http: // www.carnegiennh.org/mollusks/corbicula.pdf. 436 pages.

Cohen R.R.H., Dresler P.V., Philips E.J.P., Cory R.I. (1984) – The effect of the Asiatic clam, Corbicula fluminea, on the phytoplankton of the Potomac River, Maryland. Limnology and Oceanography 29, 170-181.

Darrigran G. (2002) – Potential impact of filter-feeding invaders on temperate inland freshwater environments. Biological Invasions 4, 145-156.

Dresler P.V., Cory R.I. (1980) – The Asiatic clam, Corbicula fluminea (Müller) in the tidal Potomac River, Maryland. Estuaries 3, 150-151.

Dubois C. (1995)Biologie et démo-écologie d’une espèce invasive Corbicula fluminea (Mollusca: Bivalvia) originaire d’Asie: Etude en milieu naturel (canal latéral à la Garonne, France) et en canal artificiel. PhD thesis, University Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, 169 p.

Dubois C., Tourenq J.N. (1995) – Etude préliminaire de dynamique des populations de Corbicula fluminea (Bivalvia : Corbiculidae) dans la zone profonde d’un canal de la région toulousaine (France). Hydroécologie Appliquée, 7, 19-28.

Fichez R., Adjeroud M., Beliaeff B., Bozec Y.M., Breau L., Chancerelle Y., Chevillon C., Frouin P., Kulbicki M., Moreton B., Payri C., Perez T., Sasal P., Thébault J. (2005) – Selected indicators of anthropogenic inputs of particles, nutrients and metals in coral reef lagoon systems. Aquatic Living Resources 18, 125-147.

French III J.R.P., Schloesser D.W. (1991) – Growth and overwinter survival of the Asiatic clam, Corbicula fluminea, in the St. Clair River, Michigan. Hydrobiologia 219, 165-170.

Gutierrez J.L., Jones C.G., Strayer D.L., Iribarne O.O. (2003) – Mollusks as ecosystem engineers: the role of shell production in aquatic habitats. Oikos 101, 79-90.

Hakenkamp C.C., Palmer M.A. (1999) – Introduced bivalves in freshwater ecosystems: the impact of Corbicula on organic matter dynamics in a sandy stream. Oecologia 119, 445-451.

Hornbach D.J. (1992) – Life history traits of a riverine population of the Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea. American Midland Naturalist 127, 248-257.

Ituarte C.F. (1981) – Primera noticia acerca de la introduccion de pelecipodos asiaticos en el area Rioplatense (Mollusca, Corbiculidae). Neotropica 27, 79-82.

Jones C.G., Lawton J.H., Shachak M. (1994) – Organisms as ecosystem engineers. Oikos 69, 373-386.

Karatayev A.Y., Howells R.G., Burlakova L.E., Sewell B.D. (2005) – History of spread and current distribution of Corbicula fluminea (Müller) in Texas. Journal of Shellfisheries Research 24, 553-559.

Kidwell S.M. (1991) – The stratigraphy of shell concentrations. In Allison P.A., Briggs D.E.G. (Eds.): Taphonomy Releasing the Data Locked in the Fossil Record, Plenum Press, New York, 9, 211-290.

Kinzelbach R. (1991) – Die Körbchenmuscheln Corbicula fluminalis, Corbicula fluminea und Corbicula fluviatilis in Europa (Bivalvia: Corbiculidae). Mainzer Naturwissenschaften Archiv 29, 215-228.

Lauritsen D.D. (1986) – Filter-feeding in Corbicula fluminea and its effect on seston removal. Journal of the North American Benthological Society 5, 165-172.

Lauritsen D.D., Mozley S.C. (1989) – Nutrient excretion by the Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea. Journal of the North American Benthological Society 8, 134-139.

Leff L.G., Burch J.L., McArthur J.V. (1990) – Spatial distribution, seston removal, and potential competitive interactions of the bivalves Corbicula fluminea and Elliptio complanata, in a coastal plain stream. Freshwater Biology 24, 409-416.

Marescaux J., Pigneur L.M., Van Doninck K. (2010) – New records of Corbicula clams in French rivers. Aquatic Invasions 5, 35-39.

Marsh P.C. (1985) – Secondary production of introduced Asiatic clam, Corbicula fluminea, in a central Arizona canal. Hydrobiologia 124, 103-110.

McMahon R.F. (1982) – The occurrence and spread of the introduced Asiatic freshwater clam, Corbicula fluminea (MüIler) in North America: 1924-1 982. The Nautilus 96, 134-141.

McMahon R.F. (2002) – Evolutionary and physiological adaptations of aquatic invasive animals: r selection versus resistance. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 59, 1235-1244.

McMahon R.F., Bogan A.E. (2001) – Mollusca: Bivalvia. In Thorp J.H., Covich A.P. (Eds.): Ecology and Classification of North American Freshwater Invertebrates, 2nd edition. Academic Press, London, 331-429.

Mouthon J. (1981) – Sur la présence en France et au Portugal de Corbicula (Bivalvia, Corbiculidae) originaire d’Asie. Basteria 45, 109-116.

Mouthon J. (2001) – Life cycle and population dynamics of the Asian clam Corbicula fluminea (Bivalvia: Corbiculidae) in the Saone River at Lyon (France). Hydrobiologia 452, 109-119.

Neves R.J., Odum M.C. (1989) – Muskrat predation on endangered freshwater mussels in Virginia. Journal of Wildlife Management 53, 934-941.

Phelps H.L. (1985) Summer 1984 Survey of Mollusc Populations of the Potomac and Anacostia Rivers near Washington DC. Report to the District of Columbia Environmental Services, Washington, District of Columbia, USA, 67 p.

Poff N.L., Palmer M.A., Angermeier P.L., Vadas Jr R.L., Hakenkamp C.C., Bely A, Arensburger P., Martin A.P. (1993) – The size structure of a metazoan community in a Piedmont stream. Oecologia 95, 202-209.

Powell E.N., Staff G.M., Davies D.J., Callender W.R. (1989) – Macrobenthic death assemblages in modern marine environments: formation, interpretation, and application. Critical Reviews in Aquatic Sciences 1, 555-589.

Prokopovich N.P. (1969) – Deposition of clastic sediments by clam. Journal of Sedimentary Petrology 39, 891-901.

Reid R.G.B., McMahon R.F., Foighil D.O., Finnigan R. (1992) – Anterior inhalant currents and pedal feeding in bivalves. Veliger 35, 93-104.

Rice S.P., Church M., Wooldridge C.L., Hickin E.J. (2009) – Morphology and evolution of bars in a wandering gravel-bed river; lower Fraser River, British Columbia, Canada. Sedimentology 56, 709-736.

Schmidlin S., Baur B. (2007) – Distribution and substrate preference of the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea in the River Rhine in the region of Basel (Switzerland, Germany, France). Aquatic Sciences 69, 153-161.

Schwinghammer P. (1981) – Characteristic size distributions of integral benthic communities. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 38, 1255-1263.

Shields A. (1936) – Anwendung der Ähnlichkeitsmechanik und der Turbulenzforschung auf die Geschiebebewegung. Mitteilungen der Preußischen Versuchsanstalt für Wasserbau, 26. Preußische Versuchsanstalt für Wasserbau, Berlin, 26 p.

Sinclair R.M. (1971) – Annotated bibliography on the exotic bivalve Corbicula in North America, 1900-1971. Sterkiana 43, 11-18.

Sousa R., Nogueira A.J.A., Gaspar M.G., Antunes C., Guilhermino L. (2008a) – Growth and extremely high production of the non-indigenous invasive species Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774): Possible implications for ecosystem functioning. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science 80, 289-295.

Sousa R., Antunes C., Guilhermino L. (2008b) – Ecology of the invasive Asian clam Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774) in aquatic ecosystems: an overview. International Journal of Limnology 44, 85-94.

Steiger J., James M., Gazelle F. (1998) – Channelization and consequences on floodplain system functioning on the Garonne River, SW France. Regulated Rivers. Research and Management 14, 13-23.

Steiger J., Corenblit D., Vervier P. (2000) – Les ajustements morphologiques contemporains du lit mineur de la Garonne, France et leurs effets sur l’hydrosystème fluvial. Zeitschrift für Geomorphologie Z., N.F., Suppl.-Bd. 122, 227-246.

Steiger J., Gurnell A.M., Goodson J. (2003) – Quantifying and characterising contemporary riparian sedimentation. River Research and Applications 19, 335-352.

Swinnen F., Leynen M., Sablon R., Duvivier L.,Vanmaele R. (1998) – The Asiatic clam Corbicula (Bivalvia: Corbiculidae) in Belgium. Bulletin de l’Institut Royal des Sciences Naturelles de Belgique, Biologie, 68, 47-53.

Vincent T., Brancotte V. (2000) – Le bivalve invasif asiatique Corbicula fluminea (Heterodonta, Sphaeriacea) dans le bassin hydrographique de la Seine : première prospection systématique et hypothèse sur la colonisation. Hydroécologie Appliquée, 12, 147-158.

Walling D.E., He Q. (1997) – Use of fallout Cs-137 in investigations of overbank sediment deposition on river floodplains. Catena 29, 263-282.

Weitere M., Vohmann A., Schultz N., Linn C., Dietrich D., Arnt H. (2009) – Linking environnemental warming to the fitness of the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea. Global Change Biology 15, 2838-2851.

Werner S., Rothhaupt K.O. (2008) – Mass mortality of the invasive bivalve Corbicula fluminea induced by a severe low-water event and associated low water temperatures. Hydrobiologia 613, 143-150.

Haut de page

Annexe

Version française abrégée

Le mollusque aquatique d’eau douce C. fluminea (fig. 1A), natif d’Asie du Sud-Est, a étendu son aire d’extension depuis environ quatre-vingt ans (Karatayev et al., 2005). Le mollusque atteint aujourd’hui de très fortes densités de population dans de nombreux cours d’eau, canaux artificiels et lacs dans le Monde (tab. 1). A l’échelle globale, C. fluminea est aujourd’hui considérée comme l’une des principales espèces exotiques invasives au sein des systèmes aquatiques (Darrigran, 2002 ; McMahon, 2002 ; Sousa et al., 2008a). R.F. McMahon (2002) a suggéré que le succès d’invasion de C. fluminea s’explique par sa grande amplitude écologique, une grande fertilité et une maturité sexuelle rapidement atteinte. Des comptages entrepris par l’auteur durant l’année 2004 sur la Garonne, à proximité de la confluence avec le Tarn, indiquent une période de forte production larvaire concentrée entre les mois de mai et d’août, avec un pic en juin (fig. 2). L’espèce C. fluminea est aujourd’hui très abondante au sein de certains cours d’eau dans le Monde. De fait, le mollusque a des impacts importants sur le cycle de la matière organique dans la colonne sédimentaire et au sein de la colonne d’eau (Reid et al., 1992 ; Hakenkamp et Palmer, 1999). Il transforme des détritus en biomasse et produit du CaCO3 sous la forme de coquilles carbonatées en prélevant du Ca et du HCO3 dans le milieu. Le taux de production de ce mollusque peut atteindre entre 50 g et 1 000 g de CaCO3 m2/an (Chase, 1999 a et b ; McMahon et Bogan, 2001). A titre de comparaison, le taux de sédimentation minérale de CaCO3 dans les estuaires est estimé à 1-3 mm/an. Ainsi, les dépôts de 0,02 mm/an à 0,35 mm/an par C. fluminea doivent être considérés comme très importants (Gutierrez et al., 2003) et comme des puits de biomasse (Schwinghammer, 1981). Les coquilles de C. fluminea déposées sur les marges des cours d’eau peuvent potentiellement subsister à l’échelle géologique dans le cas où l’abrasion mécanique et la dissolution chimique sont négligeables (Powell et al., 1989 ; Kidwell, 1991).

Le mollusque a récemment été défini comme un « ingénieur d’écosystème » (Gutierrez et al., 2003). Par définition, une espèce ingénieur contrôle, directement ou indirectement, la dynamique d’autres espèces via des changements d’états physicochimiques qu’elle impose au sein de son habitat (Jones et al., 1994). J.L. Gutierrez et al. (2003) et S. Werner et K.O. Rothhaupt (2008) ont en effet noté qu’au sein des chenaux fluviatiles à fond meuble, la production de coquilles par C. fluminea augmente considérablement l’hétérogénéité et la disponibilité de surfaces dures nécessaires pour d’autres espèces aquatiques préférant des habitats structurés. Néanmoins, à notre connaissance, les coquilles des mollusques n’ont jamais encore été considérées comme des éléments modulant la structure des formes fluviales riveraines contemporaines (par exemple, des bancs alluviaux ou des berges).

L’objectif de cette étude exploratoire est de contribuer à l’initiation de recherches à l’interface entre la géomorphologie fluviale et l’hydroécologie en relation avec les impacts biogéomorphologiques de C. fluminea sur les marges immédiates du chenal des cours d’eau envahis. Nous testons l’hypothèse que l’expansion des populations de C. fluminea, pendant les trente dernières années au sein du fleuve Garonne, France (Dubois, 1995), a été à l’origine d’une accumulation massive de coquilles sur les bancs alluviaux. Nous suggérons que cette accumulation modifie certaines des propriétés géomorphologiques et écologiques des bancs alluviaux et des marges riveraines. Nous suggérons également que les coquilles peuvent être utilisées en tant que marqueur biochimique de la température de l’eau (Bucci et al., 2008), pour différents éléments, par exemple les métaux lourds (Fichez et al., 2005), et comme biomarqueur géomorphologique pour l’étude de l’évolution récente des plaines alluviales et de leurs taux de sédimentation associés. Nous discutons, de manière ciblée, le patron spatial d’accumulation de coquilles sur un banc alluvial de la Garonne et suggérons des protocoles biogéomorphologiques pour les futures analyses quantitatives in situ et en laboratoire.

Afin d’évaluer l’étendue surfacique des bancs alluviaux où les coquilles de C. fluminea peuvent être considérées comme une source sédimentaire carbonatées renouvelable contribuant à la construction et la transformation de l’habitat riverain, une campagne de terrain a été menée en juin 2009 sur la Garonne, rivière chenalisée en déficit sédimentaire (Steiger et al., 1998, 2000). L’abondance des coquilles a été observée de manière qualitative sur cinq bancs alluviaux de la Garonne, entre les villes de Toulouse (43°36’32’’N ; 1°24’45’’E ; 132 m NGF) et Verdun-sur-Garonne (43°51’17’’N; 1°14’35’’E; 95 m NGF), soit sur un tronçon de 35 km de longueur. Un ciblage semi-quantitatif basé sur une estimation visuelle de l’abondance des coquilles en surface a été effectué sur un banc représentatif, le banc S2 (fig. 3 et fig. 4).

Nos observations indiquent que des quantités massives de coquilles de C. fluminea ont été déposées dans des localisations spécifiques sur quatre des cinq bancs alluviaux étudiés, c’est-à-dire sur 80 % des bancs pris en compte dans cette étude. Ces résultats suggèrent que, dans certains écosystèmes aquatiques d’eau douce ou saumâtre, l’invasion contemporaine par C. fluminea peut induire des changements rapides, significatifs et potentiellement permanents de l’habitat riverain. Grâce à l’accrétion des coquilles et leur stabilisation via la croissance végétale, C. fluminea peut également contribuer de manière significative à la construction des bancs alluviaux à l’échelle locale au sein des cours d’eau envahis, en particulier sur les surfaces géomorphologiques soumises à une très forte connexion hydrologique (fig. 4). Au sein de ces unités, un habitat progressivement modifié s’individualise via un mélange de coquilles et de sédiments minéraux fins (fig. 1B et C et fig. 5). De part la nature physicochimique et la forme (donc la surface spécifique) particulière des coquilles des mollusques par rapport aux sables, graviers et galets naturellement transportés et déposés par la moyenne Garonne, la transformation des caractéristiques texturales, structurales et chimiques du substrat sur les bancs alluviaux s’accompagne probablement de modifications sensibles de la structure écologique (par exemple, composition de la végétation et dynamiques de succession, macro-invertébrés) et du fonctionnement (par exemple, cycles biochimiques et des nutriments) du système riverain.

Nous suggérons, en outre, que les dépôts massifs des coquilles du mollusque C. fluminea présentent une opportunité pour les biogéomorphologues pour quantifier l’étendue spatiotemporelle et l’intensité de la construction de l’habitat fluvial dans une gamme variée de cours d’eau envahis dans le Monde. Un aspect important sera la quantification spatialement explicite des dépôts de coquilles (c’est-à-dire localisation et couverture surfacique des dépôts, densité et biomasse) sur des bancs alluviaux en relation avec le régime hydrologique et la topographie initiale ainsi que la rugosité de la surface alluviale. Des expérimentations en conditions contrôlées sont nécessaires pour mieux appréhender de manière formelle les processus mécaniques de transport des coquilles et pour définir 1) la contrainte de cisaillement critique pour leur mise en mouvement, 2) les modalités de transport dans l’eau et 3) les seuils de dépôt en relation avec le diamètre et la densité des coquilles, la profondeur et la turbidité de l’eau et les vitesses de l’écoulement. De plus, une analyse détaillée des cernes de croissance de coquilles individuelles déposées dans les cours d’eau est décisive pour la quantification des patrons de croissance annuelle et sub-annuelle et leur corrélation avec le régime hydrologique et les températures de l’eau. Nous suggérons que les coquilles de C  fluminea sont destinées à devenir un nouveau biomarqueur pour l’étude des taux de sédimentation dans de nombreux cours d’eau, et ainsi de l’évolution récente des plaines alluviales.

En conclusion, nous soulignons l’opportunité pour les biogéomorphologues d’étudier, en relation avec les changements climatiques et environnementaux actuels, les changements contemporains des formes fluviales et de l’habitat riverain causés par un mollusque grandement invasif, C. fluminea. Les recherches futures envisagées ici (fig. 6) sur les rivières envahies par C. fluminea devraient permettre aux scientifiques de cerner les changements structurels et fonctionnels biogéomorphologiques potentiellement durables provoqués par un ingénieur d’écosystème exotique. Ce type d’approche contribuera au développement de nouveaux outils pour l’analyse des dynamiques chimiques et sédimentaires contemporaines dans les cours d’eau.

Haut de page

Table des illustrations

Titre Fig. 1 – Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774). Fig. 1 – Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774).
Légende A: The shell tint is generally clear, light yellow or yellow-green. These colours can flake with time leaving white spots. The shell colour on the inside is light purple. The shell shape is relatively round and of equal length and height. The shell diameter of the adult individual generally reaches 10 mm, with the biggest individuals sometimes growing up to 50 mm. B: Photographs showing deposited shells of C. fluminea on Site 2 with a surface density estimated to be approximately 8 000 shells/m2. C: Photographs showing mixtures of shells and sands in the subsurface, at a depth of a maximum of 40 cm.A : La teinte de la coquille est généralement claire, jaune pâle ou tirant vers le jaune-vert. Ces couleurs peuvent s’altérer avec le temps, laissant apparaître des zones blanches. La couleur à l’intérieur de la coquille est violet-clair. Ca forme est arrondie, avec une largeur et une hauteur équivalentes. Le diamètre moyen des coquilles des individus adultes est d’environ 10 mm, avec parfois des pics à 50 mm. B : Photographie montrant un dépôt de coquilles de C. fluminea sur le Site 2 avec une densité de recouvrement estimée approximativement à 8 000 coquilles/m². C : Photographie montrant un mélange sub-surfacique de coquilles et de sables à une profondeur de 40 cm.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/10206/img-1.png
Fichier image/png, 3,3M
Titre Fig. 2 – Number of individual bivalve larvae (mainly C. fluminea) per second crossing the Garonne channel section near the confluence with the Tarn River. Fig. 2 – Nombre d’individus larvaires de bivalves (principalement C. fluminea) par seconde traversant une section de chenal de la Garonne près de la confluence avec le Tarn.
Légende The values where defined each month by filtrating 50 l of water. Les valeurs ont été définies tous les mois de l’année 2004 via la filtration de 5  l d’eau.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/10206/img-2.png
Fichier image/png, 18k
Titre Fig. 3 – Study reach on the Garonne River, south-western France, between Toulouse and Verdun-sur-Garonne (35 km). Fig. 3 – Secteur d’étude sur le fleuve Garonne, Sud-ouest de la France, entre Toulouse et Verdun-sur-Garonne (35 km).
Légende Observations were undertaken on alluvial bars S1 to S5, which possess similar biogeomorphological properties: size (400-600-m long and 100-m wide), partially covered by riparian vegetation, and the presence of a chute channel. Les observations ont été effectuées sur les bancs alluviaux S1 à S5 possédants des caractéristiques biogéomorphologiques équivalentes : taille (400-600 m de long et 100 m de large), partiellement recouverts de végétation riveraine et avec la présence d’un chenal de secondaire de chute.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/10206/img-3.png
Fichier image/png, 489k
Titre Fig. 4 – Data. Fig. 4 – Données.
Légende A: Alluvial bar S2 (aerial photographs, date: 2002) where a high-resolution survey of surface shell densities was conducted. B: Location of transects with location of sampling plots and geomorphological units (situation in 2009). C: Interpolated map with six classes of shell densities; the location and direction (arrow) of the photographs corresponding to fig. 5 are indicated in the map. A : Banc alluvial S2 (photographie aérienne ; date : 2002) sur lequel la densité de coquilles en surface a été mesurée avec une haute définition. B : Localisation des transects, des quadrats de mesure et des unités géomorphologiques (situation en 2009). C : Carte d’interpolation avec six classes de densité de recouvrement ; la localisation et la direction (flèches) des photographies correspondants à la fig. 5 sont indiquées sur la carte.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/10206/img-4.png
Fichier image/png, 2,7M
Titre Fig. 5 – Depositional forms constituted by shells of C. fluminea on alluvial bars of the River Garonne (example of S2). Fig. 5 – Formes de dépôts constituées par des coquilles de C. fluminea sur les bancs alluviaux de la Garonne (exemple du S2).
Légende A: On a tail of point bar. B: On the margins of chute channel on the tail of the alluvial bar. C: At the shelter of external limits of pioneer riparian forest. D: Downstream individual herbaceous plants. See fig. 3C for location. Photographs: D. Corenblit, 2009.A : Sur une portion aval du banc de convexité. B : Sur la marge du chenal de chute en aval du banc alluvial. C : À l’abri au sein de la limite extérieure de la forêt pionnière riveraine. D : En aval d’individus herbacés. Localisation in fig. 3C.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/10206/img-5.png
Fichier image/png, 434k
Titre Fig. 6 – Proposed research methodologies and tools for studying shell deposition in river channel margins and effects on fluvial landform dynamics and riparian ecosystem processes.Fig. 6 – Propositions de méthodes et d’outils pour l’étude des dépôts de coquilles dans le chenal et sur les marges des cours d’eau et l'étude des effets sur la dynamique des formes fluviales et sur le fonctionnement écologique de la zone riveraine.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/10206/img-6.png
Fichier image/png, 318k
Haut de page

Pour citer cet article

Référence papier

Dov Corenblit, Frederic Julien, Johannes Steiger, José Darrozes et Benoit Mialet, « High shell deposition of the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774) on alluvial bars: exploratory investigations and biogeomorphological research perspectives », Géomorphologie : relief, processus, environnement, vol. 19 - n° 2 | 2013, 153-164.

Référence électronique

Dov Corenblit, Frederic Julien, Johannes Steiger, José Darrozes et Benoit Mialet, « High shell deposition of the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774) on alluvial bars: exploratory investigations and biogeomorphological research perspectives », Géomorphologie : relief, processus, environnement [En ligne], vol. 19 - n° 2 | 2013, mis en ligne le 26 août 2015, consulté le 21 août 2017. URL : http://geomorphologie.revues.org/10206 ; DOI : 10.4000/geomorphologie.10206

Haut de page

Auteurs

Dov Corenblit

Clermont Université – Maison des Sciences de l’Homme – BP 10448 – F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand – France; CNRS, UMR 6042 GEOLAB – Laboratoire de Géographie Physique et Environnementale – 63057 Clermont-Ferrand – France (dov.corenblit@univ-bpclermont.fr).

Frederic Julien

Université Paul Sabatier – INP – CNRS, UMR 5245 EcoLab – Laboratoire écologie fonctionnelle et environnement – Université Toulouse 3 – 31062 Toulouse – France.

Johannes Steiger

Clermont Université – Maison des Sciences de l’Homme – BP 10448 – F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand – France; CNRS, UMR 6042 GEOLAB – Laboratoire de Géographie Physique et Environnementale – 63057 Clermont-Ferrand – France.

José Darrozes

Université Paul Sabatier – INP – CNRS, UMR 5563 GET – Géosciences Environnement Toulouse – Université Toulouse 3 – 31062 Toulouse – France.

Benoit Mialet

Université Paul Sabatier – INP – CNRS, UMR 5245 EcoLab – Laboratoire écologie fonctionnelle et environnement – Université Toulouse 3 – 31062 Toulouse – France.

Haut de page

Droits d’auteur

© Groupe français de géomorphologie

Haut de page
  • Logo CNRS - Institut des sciences humaines et sociales
  • Logo Groupe français de géomorphologie
  • Revues.org