Navigation – Plan du site

Topographical control of large-scale sediment transport by a river valley during the 24 ka sector collapse of Asama volcano, Japan

Contrôle topographique du transport d’une grande masse de débris volcaniques exercé par une vallée lors de l’effondrement de flanc du volcan Asama au Japon, il y a 24 000 ans B.P.
Hidetsugu Yoshida et Toshihiko Sugai
p. 217-224

Résumés

Des dépôts issus de l’effondrement survenu il y a 24 000 ans au flanc du volcan Asama, au Japon central, peuvent être suivis jusqu’à 90–100 km de la source. Les débris ont été transportés sous la forme d’un seul écoulement par gravité, qui avait les propriétés d’une avalanche de débris. Cet écoulement s’est propagé à travers une vallée fluviale étroite en forte pente sur une distance de 50 km. À l’aval, dans la principale zone de dépôt, située entre 80 et 100 km de la source et où la vallée s’élargit, des débris de 15 m d’épaisseur en moyenne recouvrent des sables et des limons fluviatiles et s’étalent sur une superficie de l’ordre de 200 km2. Ainsi, des vallées en forme de V dans des terrains volcaniques sont susceptibles de canaliser vers des plaines situées à l’aval des quantités importantes de débris provenant d’un effondrement de flanc.

Haut de page

Errata

Article soumis le 3 janvier 2006, accepté le 18 juin 2007

Notes de la rédaction

Acknowledgments
We thank Professor H. Ohmori and the members of the Program of Natural Environmental Changes, the University of Tokyo for their suggestions and fruitful discussion. The manuscript has been improved by the critical comments of the reviewers and Professor J.-C. Thouret. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to Prof. Thouret who also kindly translated the parts of the manuscript required in French. Part of this study was supported financially by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, No. 16511458 and No. 16500643.

Texte intégral

Introduction

1Mountain rivers with steep slopes and Quaternary stratovolcanoes are characteristic landforms in subduction zones such as Japan. Stratovolcanoes generally experience large-scale collapses, that are larger than those which occur in nonvolcanic mountains (Voight, 1978; Machida, 1984). Such collapse is called a volcanic sector collapse (Ui, 1983; Ui et al., 1986; Siebert, 1984, 1992; Siebert et al., 1987). In the case of volcanoes located inland in a subduction setting, material produced by a sector collapse may move down steep river valleys and reach lowland plains (Machida, 1984). As a result, sector collapse-related deposits can sometimes contribute to landform development and aggradation in the lower reaches of drainage basins. This possibility is potentially serious and should be taken into account in natural hazard assessment in Japan, the Philippines, Indonesia, and other countries in similar environments where populations and infrastructure are concentrated along river valleys and on plains. However, detailed investigation of these large-scale events, which generally do not occur with high frequency,  has been restricted to relatively recent historical events such as Mount St. Helens (United States) eruption in 1980 (Voight et al., 1983; Glicken, 1996) and Bandai volcano, Japan, in 1888 (Nakamura, 1978; Moriya, 1988).

2Studies are needed on how and where primary material produced by prehistoric collapses traveled. In Japan, the Kisogawa volcanic mudflow is one of the few known examples of material traveling a long distance after a sector collapse of a volcanic edifice (The Quaternary Research Group of the Kiso Valley and Kigoshi, 1964; Takarada et al., 1999). This sediment transport occurred at ca. 50 ka, and the event-related deposits are traceable as far as 46 km from the source area as debris-avalanche deposits, which are then progressively transformed to debris-flow deposits traceable as far as 144 km from the source (Takarada et al., 1999). The source volcano is the 3063-m-high Ontake volcano located 210 km west of Tokyo in central Japan. As the event-related sediments are overlain by alluvium in the plain, a complete picture of the sediment transport and depositional processes has not been obtained.

3On the other hand, sediments derived from the sector collapse of Asama volcano at ca. 24 ka (fig. 1; Aramaki, 1963; Unozawa and Sakamoto, 1972; Nakamura et al., 1997; Takemoto and Kubo, 2003) are exposed continuously along the present river course, as far as 90-100 km from the source.

Fig. 1 – Shaded relief map of the region of the study area showing the distribution of deposits derived from the sector collapse of Asama volcano (modified after Yoshida and Sugai, 2007).
Fig. 1 – Carte en relief de la région étudiée montrant la distribution des débris provenant de l’effondrement de flanc du volcan Asama (modifiée d’après Yoshida et Sugai, 2007).

Fig. 1 – Shaded relief map of the region of the study area showing the distribution of deposits derived from the sector collapse of Asama volcano (modified after Yoshida and Sugai, 2007).Fig. 1 – Carte en relief de la région étudiée montrant la distribution des débris provenant de l’effondrement de flanc du volcan Asama (modifiée d’après Yoshida et Sugai, 2007).

1: locations in fig. 2; 2: cross sections in fig. 3; 3: presumed distribution of deposits.
1 : localisations sur la fig. 2 ; 2 : coupes sur la fig. 3 ; 3 : répartition supposée des débris.

4The Asama event enables us to investigate the nature of catastrophic material transport by examining the lithofacies of the sediments and the depositional landforms. Asama volcano, a 2568-m-high edifice in the northwestern Kanto district, central Japan, is one of the most active Quaternary stratovolcanoes in Japan (fig. 1). Its assumed pre-collapse height was ca. 2900 m a.s.l. (Aramaki, 1963). The volcanic edifice is composed of an alternation of pyroclastic beds and lava flows composed of pyroxene andesites. Deposits originated from the sector collapse have been discovered in the surrounding region, and the deposits have been correlated with high accuracy using tephrochronology (fig. 1; Aramaki, 1963; Unozawa and Sakamoto, 1972; Nakamura et al., 1997; Takemoto and Kubo, 2003). We focus here on how and where the collapsed materials from Asama volcano traveled, paying particular attention to the topography along the flow path.

Volcaniclastic sediments produced by the sector collapse of Asama volcano

5This research deals with the material traveling away from the northern flank of Asama volcano. The lithofacies of the sector collapse deposits depends on travel distance from the source. In the Ohkuwa region, up to about 20 km from the source (fig. 1), large blocks with many jigsaw cracks are exposed in the sediment and the matrix is composed of clasts of various sizes with many wood fragments. This sediment is similar to reports of typical debris-avalanche deposits (a in fig. 2; Ui, 1983; Siebert, 1984). The blocks are considered to be derived from the source volcanic edifice.

Fig. 2 – Representative lithofacies of the sector collapse deposits of Asama volcano.
Fig. 2 – Lithofaciès représentatifs des débris de l’effondrement de secteur du volcan Asama.

Fig. 2 – Representative lithofacies of the sector collapse deposits of Asama volcano.Fig. 2 – Lithofaciès représentatifs des débris de l’effondrement de secteur du volcan Asama.

Locations of exposures are shown in fig. 1.
La localisation des affleurements est indiquée sur la fig. 1.

6The absence of evidence of heating in the lithofacies indicates that when transported deposits were cold, although a phreatic explosion might have led to the collapse (Aramaki, 1963). Yoshida and Sugai (2006) recognized more than 100 hummocks in the Ohkuwa region (fig. 1). In Nakanojo, ca. 45 km from the source (fig. 1), there is a deposit consisting of brittle andesite blocks with jigsaw cracks, surrounded and supported by a matrix containing rounded fluvial gravels (b in fig. 2). Several hummocks are found in Nakanojo (Yoshida and Sugai, 2006). At an exposure located ca. 86 km from the source in the northwestern corner of the Kanto Plain (fig. 1), the proportion of matrix relative to blocks is at least two or three times as large as farther upstream (c in fig. 2). The event-related deposits in this area are un-bedded and un-sorted and contain large, fragile blocks composed of non-welded pyroclastic rocks (fig. 2; Yoshida and Sugai, 2006) as well as wood fragments and rounded gravels. No hummocks are observed.

7The block size ranges from several tens of centimeters to 15 m. Observations indicate that a single gravity current transported the material as a debris avalanche (Yoshida and Sugai, 2006). The material derived from a single sector collapse at Asama volcano would have arrived in the northwestern corner of the Kanto Plain after an extremely short time, because there is no evidence of a lake being created behind a dam of debris deposits.

8Schematic topographic and geological cross sections from where the material entered the Agatsuma River valley (Naganohara) to the northwestern corner of the Kanto Plain (figs. 1 and 3; Yoshida, 2004a and b; Yoshida and Sugai, 2005) were produced from field survey data and existing borehole column data, using topographic maps (scale 1/25,000) and aerial photographs (scale 1/20,000) published by the Geographical Survey Institute, Japan. A remarkable difference  may be recognized in the elevation of the transverse depositional surface in the Agatsuma River valley, especially at Naganohara and Nakanojo (sections 1-1’ and 2-2’ in fig. 3).

Fig. 3 –Topographic and geological cross sections (modified after Yoshida, 2004a and b).
Fig. 3 – Coupes topographiques et géologiques (modifiées d’après Yoshida, 2004 a et b).

Fig. 3 –Topographic and geological cross sections (modified after Yoshida, 2004a and b).Fig. 3 – Coupes topographiques et géologiques (modifiées d’après Yoshida, 2004 a et b).

1: width of valley; 2: relative height difference; 3: borehole; 4: bedrock; 5: gravel layer (before event); 6: gravel layer (after event); 7: deposits derived from the event.
1 : largeur de vallée dans la zone de dépôt ; 2 : différences de hauteur relative entre la surfaceet la base du dépôt ; 3 : forage ; 4 : substrat ; 5 : couche de graviers (avant l’effondrement) ; 6 : couche de graviers (après l’effondrement) ; 7 : débris provenant de l’effondrement de flanc du volcan Asama.

9In contrast, the cross-sectional profile of the depositional surface is flat in the northwestern corner of the Kanto Plain (sections 4-4’, 5-5’, and 6-6’ in fig. 3). The relative height difference between the top depositional and the basal surfaces of the sector collapse deposits (i.e. the difference between the lowest altitude and the inferred highest altitude in each cross section) is 70 m at Naganohara, 40-50 m at Nakanojo and Komochi, and 15-25 m in the northwestern corner of the Kanto Plain (fig. 3).

Topographic characteristics of the valleys

10We reconstructed the projected longitudinal profiles of the approximated basal and depositional surfaces of the deposits derived from the sector collapse event of Asama volcano along the present river valleys (fig. 4A).

Fig. 4 – Longitudinal changes of geomorphological characteristics along the Agatsuma-Tone River valleys.
Fig. 4 – Évolution longitudinale des caractéristiques géomorphologiques le long des vallées des rivières Agatsuma et Tone.

Fig. 4 – Longitudinal changes of geomorphological characteristics along the Agatsuma-Tone River valleys.Fig. 4 – Évolution longitudinale des caractéristiques géomorphologiques le long des vallées des rivières Agatsuma et Tone.

A: longitudinal profiles of the present river bed and the depositional and basal surfaces of the event-related deposits from Asama volcano (modified after Yoshida et al., 2006); B: average channel slope of the basal surface at ca. 24 ka; C: width of the valley within the depositional area; D: relative height difference between the depositional and basal surfaces.
A : profils longitudinaux du lit actuel de la rivière et surfaces de dépôt et de base des débris se rapportant à l’événement du volcan Asama (modifié d’après Yoshida et al., 2006) ; B : pente moyenne du chenal de la surface de base de 24 ka ; C : largeur de vallée dans la zone de dépôt ; D : différences de hauteur relative entre la surface des dépôts et leur base.

11Before the sector collapse, the Agatsuma and Tone River valleys were steeper than they are at present. The average slope from the upper to the lower reaches was ca. 13% from Naganohara to Nakanojo, ca. 9% from Nakanojo to Komochi, ca. 6% from Komochi to northern Maebashi in the northwestern corner of the Kanto Plain, ca. 3% from northern Maebashi to southern Maebashi, and ca. 2% from southern Maebashi to Okabe, where the sector collapse deposits are no longer traceable (fig. 4B). Thus, the channel slope suddenly decreased at the northwestern corner of the Kanto Plain.

12The width of the river valley before the Asama volcano collapse event was also investigated by using topographic and geological cross sections (fig. 3). We define the pre-collapse valley width as the transverse distribution of the sector collapse deposits in each section. Thus, based on the estimated horizontal distribution of the event-related deposits, the width of the valley from Naganohara to Komochi was measured at ca. 1-km intervals along the present river course using 1/25,000 topographic maps, except for the section covered by younger sediments from Haruna volcano (Soda, 1989, 1996). The Agatsuma River valley above Komochi is narrow and less than 2-3 km wide at its widest point. In contrast, the valley width increases rapidly to several times, or ten times the width, in the northwestern corner of the Kanto Plain. Longitudinal changes in the relative height difference between the depositional and the basal surfaces of the deposits correspond well to the variations in the width of the valley (fig. 4C, D). The relative height difference decreases in the northwestern corner of the Kanto Plain, where the valley opens out. This greatly expands the horizontal space available to the flow. These clear differences in the  characteristics of the deposits and in the topography of the valleys show that the Agatsuma River acted as a corridor allowing passage of the material to the northwestern Kanto Plain. The finding is consistent with our previous report, that ca. 80% of the event-related material in the northern flank of the volcano was deposited in the northwestern corner of the Kanto Plain (Yoshida and Sugai, 2007).

Flow behavior

13The undulating and rugged cross-sectional profile of the depositional surfaces in the Agatsuma River valley suggests that the sediment flow crashed violently into the valley walls as it traveled for a distance of ca. 50 km. At Nakanojo and Komochi, the deposits cover part of the preexisting fluvial terraces, which were formed during an interstadial of the last glacial period (fig. 5).

Fig. 5 – Presumed flow behavior in the Nakanojo and Komochi regions and the impact on the existing fluvial terrace at Komochi, indicating erosion of top soil and loam from the ground surface along the main route of the flow (modified after Yoshida and Sugai, 2005; Yoshida et al. 2005). The assumed main part of the flow is schematically shown by the large arrows.
Fig. 5 – Comportement présumé de l’écoulement dans les régions de Nakanojo et Komochi et impact sur la terrasse fluviatile de Komochi, indiquant l’érosion de la terre végétale et du limon le long de la trajectoire principale de l’écoulement (modifié d’après Yoshida et Sugai, 2005 ; Yoshida et al., 2005). La partie principale supposée de l’écoulement est matérialisée schématiquement par les plus grandes flèches.

Fig. 5 – Presumed flow behavior in the Nakanojo and Komochi regions and the impact on the existing fluvial terrace at Komochi, indicating erosion of top soil and loam from the ground surface along the main route of the flow (modified after Yoshida and Sugai, 2005; Yoshida et al. 2005). The assumed main part of the flow is schematically shown by the large arrows.Fig. 5 – Comportement présumé de l’écoulement dans les régions de Nakanojo et Komochi et impact sur la terrasse fluviatile de Komochi, indiquant l’érosion de la terre végétale et du limon le long de la trajectoire principale de l’écoulement (modifié d’après Yoshida et Sugai, 2005 ; Yoshida et al., 2005). La partie principale supposée de l’écoulement est matérialisée schématiquement par les plus grandes flèches.

1: depositional surface on the existing terraces; 2: depositional area; 3: assumed flow direction.
1 : surface de dépôt sur la terrasse fluviatile ; 2 : zone de dépôt ; 3 : direction supposée de l’écoulement.

14The orientation of the major axes of the hummocks at Nakanojo  shows the approximate flow directions (fig. 5A; Yoshida and Sugai, 2005; Glicken, 1996) and indicates that the material ran violently on to the existing terraces when they struck the valley side, so creating depositional ramps (section 2-2’ in fig. 3). At Komochi loam and topsoil, with a thickness of several meters on the existing terrace surface, were in some places completely stripped (fig. 5B-2; Yoshida et al., 2005); in particular, the flow eroded several meters from the ground surface at the bottom of the southern part of the terrace, which was situated directly in the assumed flow path. This interpretation is supported by the captured fluvial gravels in the event-related sediments from Nakanojo to the northwestern corner of the Kanto Plain (Yoshida and Sugai, 2007). In another place, an undisturbed loam layer overlain by the event-related deposits is preserved on the terrace surfaces farther from the river channel (fig. 5B-3; Yoshida et al., 2005), indicating that the erosional force of the flow was restrained there by the local topography.

15The flow spread laterally as the valley widened in the northwestern corner of the Kanto Plain, where a fan gravel  (i.e.“Maebashi Gravel layer”) is extensively covered by event-related deposits (Yoshida, 2004b). Sand and silt layers a few meters thick found between the sector collapse deposits and the Maebashi Gravel layer (fig. 6) are evidence that the ground surface in the northwestern Kanto Plain was not so strongly eroded by the flow, in contrast to the flow behavior in the Agatsuma River valley.

Fig. 6 – Distribution of sand and silt between the Maebashi Gravel layer and the event-related deposits of Asama volcano in the northwestern corner of the Kanto Plain, interpreted from borehole column data.
Fig. 6 – Répartition des sables et des silts entre la couche de graviers Maebashi et les débris liés à l’événement du volcan Asama, à l’extrémité nord-ouest de la plaine de Kanto, interprétée à partir de données de forages.

Fig. 6 – Distribution of sand and silt between the Maebashi Gravel layer and the event-related deposits of Asama volcano in the northwestern corner of the Kanto Plain, interpreted from borehole column data.Fig. 6 – Répartition des sables et des silts entre la couche de graviers Maebashi et les débris liés à l’événement du volcan Asama, à l’extrémité nord-ouest de la plaine de Kanto, interprétée à partir de données de forages.

16From Komochi to the northwestern corner of the Kanto Plain, the relative height difference between the depositional and basal surfaces of the material decreased to at most one-third of the upstream value, despite the rapid increase in the valley width to even ten times the upstream width. Moreover, the depositional thickness becomes significantly greater in an area farther from the source, farther out on the Kanto Plain (figs. 3 and 4). These findings suggest that the flow was a debris avalanche, and was not completely transformed into a lahar.

Hazard implications

17In volcanic arcs, the distribution of material from sector collapse events depends on the topography in the area of the source volcano. If the volcano stands on a broad plain, a large portion of the collapsed materials will be deposited close to the source area, as in the case of Bandai volcano. If the source volcano is near the coast, a sector collapse can cause devastating tsunamis, as was the case at Ritter volcano, Papua New guinea and Mount St. Augustine, southcentral Alaska (Sigurdsson, 2000). A tsunami caused by the sector collapse of a volcano at Unzen-Mayuyama, Japan, in 1792 (Hoshizumi et al., 1999) was responsible for as many as 15,000 people being killed or missing, making this the worst volcanic disaster in Japanese history. Moreover, large amounts of material episodically produced by the collapse of inland volcanoes are likely to flow along valleys and, thus, quickly reach remote areas. The present study demonstrates that when a V-shaped valley with an average slope of 10% or so channels the flow, the sector collapse sediments can travel as far as 90-100 km, as happened in the case of Asama volcano sector collapse.

18The Kisogawa volcanic mudflow traveled 144 km from Ontake volcano down a similarly steep valley. However, there have previously been few similar studies, except for reports of cold lahars, which  were saturated with water, such as that which occurred at Nevado del Ruiz, Colombia, in 1985 (Sigurdsson and Carey, 1986; Pierson et al., 1990). One reason for the lack of such reports is that it is difficult to find evidence of debris avalanche-related deposits from prehistoric events inside steep river valleys. Another reason is that such deposits are often overlapped by alluvium in the lower depositional area, as in the case of the Ontake sediments. The physical processes resulting from volcanic sector collapses are potentially as hazardous as catastrophic tsunamis. We emphasize the necessity of re-examining the regional settings of inland volcanoes, especially in island arcs, from the point of view of both the regional topography and the effect of water on sediment transport.

Conclusions

19Volcanoes and mountain rivers with steep slopes are characteristic landforms in volcanic arcs. We examined the topography along the path of the 24 ka-old sector collapse sediments from Asama volcano, together with the depositional landforms, which were traceable as far as 90–100 km from their point of origin. Geological and geomorphological interpretation of the deposits and previous tephrochronological researches suggest strongly that they were transported as a single gravity flow, which was intense in the steep and narrow Agatsuma River valley, over a distance of about 50 km. On the other hand, the event-related material were more quietly deposited in the main depositional area, where both the channel slope and the relative height difference between the depositional and the basal surfaces of the deposits decreased as the valley width expanded. The greater thickness of the deposits in the more distant downstream area, farther out on the Kanto Plain, suggests that the flow still maintained the rheological characteristics of a debris avalanche, although the effect of water on the sediment flow dynamics is still obscure. A V-shaped valley, with an average slope of ca. 10%, can thus transport large quantities of material produced in volcanic terrains to a downstream plain within an extremely short period, as occurred with both the Asama volcano sector collapse and the Kisogawa volcanic mudflow.

Haut de page

Bibliographie

Aramaki S. (1963) – Geology of Asama Volcano. Journal of the Faculty of Science, University of Tokyo, Section 2, 14, 229-443.

Glicken H. (1996) – Rockslide-debris avalanche of May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens, Washington. USGS Open-file Report, 96-677, 1-90.

Hoshizumi H., Uto K. and Watanabe K. (1999) – Geology and eruptive history of Unzen Volcano, Shimabara Peninsula, Kyushu, SW Japan. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 89, 81-94.

Machida H. (1984) – Large-scale rockslides, avalanches and related phenomena: A short review. Transactions, Japanese Geomorphological Union, 5, 155-178 (in Japanese with English abstract).

Moriya I. (1988) – Geomorphological Development of Bandai Volcano. Journal of Geography 97, 293-300 (in Japanese).

Nakamura Y. (1978) – Geology and petrology of Bandai and Nekoma Volcanoes. Science Reports of the Tohoku University, Series 3, 14, 67-119.

Nakamura T., Tsuji S., Takemoto H. and Ikeda A. (1997) – 14C age measurements with accelerator mass spectrometry of Asama Tephra stratigraphic samples around Minami-Karuizawa, the Latest Pleistocene, Nagano Prefecture, central Japan. Journal of the Geological Society of Japan 103, 990-993 (in Japanese with English abstract).

Pierson T.C., Janda R.J., Thouret J.-C. and Barrero C.A. (1990) – Perturbation and melting of snow and ice by the 13 November 1985 eruption of Nevado del Ruiz, Colombia, and consequent mobilization, flow and deposition of lahars. In Williams S.N. (ed.): Nevado del Ruiz Volcano, Colombia, I. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 41, 17–66.

Siebert L. (1984) – Large volcanic debris avalanches: characteristics of source areas, deposits, and associated eruptions. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 22, 163-197.

Siebert L. (1992) – Threats from debris avalanches. Nature 356, 658-659.

Siebert L., Glicken H. and Ui T. (1987) – Volcanic hazards from Bezymianny- and Bandai-type eruptions. Bulletin of Volcanology, 49, 435-459.

Sigurdsson H. eds. (2000) – Encyclopedia of Volcanoes. Academic Press, 1417 p.

Sigurdsson H. and Carey S. (1986) – Volcanic disasters in Latin America and the 13th November 1985 eruption of Nevado del Ruiz in Colombia. Disasters 10, 205-216.

Soda T. (1989) – Two 6th century eruptions of Haruna Volcano, central Japan. The Quaternary Research 27, 297-312 (in Japanese with English abstract).

Soda T. (1996) – Explosive activities of Haruna Volcano and their impact on human life in the sixth century A.D. Geographical Reports of Tokyo Metropolitan University, 31, 37-52.

Takarada S., Ui T. and Yamamoto Y. (1999) – Depositional features and transport mechanism of valley-filling Iwasegawa and Kaida debris avalanches, Japan. Bulletin of Volcanology, 60, 508-522.

Takemoto H. and Kubo S. (2003) – Tephrostratigraphy of the Ohkuwa Debris Avalanche Asama Volcano, central Japan. Proceedings of the Institute of Natural Sciences, Nihon University, Section 2, Department of Geosystem Sciences, 38, 55-64 (in Japanese with English abstract).

The Quaternary Research Group of the Kiso Valley, and Kigoshi K. (1964) – Radiocarbon data of the Kisogawa volcanic mudflows and its significance on the Würmian chronology of Japan. Earth Science 71, 1-7.

Ui T. (1983) – Volcanic dry avalanche deposits – identification and comparison with nonvolcanic debris stream deposits. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 18, 135-150.

Ui T., Yamamoto H. and Suzuki-Kamata K. (1986) – Characterization of debris avalanche deposits in Japan. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 29, 231-243.

Unozawa A. and Sakamoto T. (1972) – Recent history of Minami-Karuizawa, Nagano Prefecture, central Japan. Journal of Geological Society of Japan 78, 489-494 (in Japanese with English abstract).

Voight B. eds. (1978) – Rockslides and avalanches. Vol. 1. New York, Elsevier, 833 p.

Voight B., Janda R.J., Glicken H. and Douglass P.M. (1983) – Nature and mechanism of the Mount St. Helens rockslide-avalanche of May 1980. Geotechnique, 33, 243-273.

Yoshida H. (2004a) – Volumetric analysis of the Maebashi mud flow deposit based on borehole columns and GIS. Transactions, Japanese Geomorphological Union 25, 63-73 (in Japanese with English abstract).

Yoshida H. (2004b) – Mud flow deposits derived from the activity of Asama volcano and their impacts on the geomorphological development of the northwestern part of the Kanto Plain, central Japan. Geographical Review of Japan 77, 544-562 (in Japanese with English abstract).

Yoshida H. and Sugai T. (2005) – Impact of “24 ka Nakanojo Mud Flow” event on the fluvial landform development in Nakanojo Basin, central Japan. The Quaternary Research 44, 1-13 (in Japanese with English abstract).

Yoshida H. and Sugai T. (2006) – Morphological characteristics of hummocks originating from the 24 ka sector collapse event of Asama volcano, central Japan. Journal of Geography 115, 638-646 (in Japanese with English abstract).

Yoshida H and Sugai T. (2007) – Magnitude of the sediment transport event due to the Late Pleistocene sector collapse of Asama volcano, central Japan. Geomorphology 86, 61-72.

Yoshida H., Sugai T., and Sakaguchi H. (2005) – Contribution of the Maebashi Mud flow event to the fluvial landform development neighboring the confluence of the Tone River and the Agatsuma River, central Japan. Geographical Review of Japan 78, 649-660 (in Japanese with English abstract).

Yoshida H., Sugai T. and Ohmori H. (2006) – Transportation mechanism of debris avalanche event at 24 ka of Asama volcano, central Japan, interpreted from chemical composition of the deposits. The Quaternary Research 45, 123-129 (in Japanese with English abstract).

Haut de page

Annexe

Version française abrégée

Les débris produits par un effondrement sectoriel sur un volcan (Ui, 1983 ; Ui et al., 1986 ; Siebert, 1984, 1992 ; Siebert et al., 1987) peuvent s’écouler canalisés dans une vallée sous la  forme d’une avalanche et ainsi atteindre les piémonts et les plaines environnantes à grande distance du lieu où celle-ci a été déclenchée (Machida, 1984). Ces dépôts peuvent parfois contribuer à la formation de nouvelles formes de relief et à l’aggradation (construction de terrasses et colmatage des dépressions) dans le cours inférieur des principales vallées du bassin versant qui draine l’édifice volcanique. Cet effet, potentiellement dangereux, doit être pris en compte lorsque l’on souhaite évaluer les risques naturels dans les arcs volcaniques proches des zones de subduction comme c’est le cas au Japon. Cependant, les recherches détaillées à propos de ces événements de grande magnitude sont limitées aux avalanches historiques telles que celle du Mont St. Helens (États-Unis) en 1980 (Voight et al., 1983 ; Glicken, 1996) et du volcan Bandai au Japon en 1888 (Nakamura, 1978 ; Moriya, 1988). Il manque encore des études détaillées sur la localisation et les processus par lesquels les matériaux engendrés par des effondrements préhistoriques se sont propagés. Notre travail de recherche prend pour objet les sédiments volcanoclastiques issus de l’effondrement sectoriel du volcan Asama, d’âge préhistorique (environ 24 000 ans) (fig. 1 ; Aramaki, 1963) : le but est de clarifier la nature du transport des débris en accordant une attention particulière aux formes du dépôt et à leurs liens avec la topographie le long de la trajectoire de l’avalanche. Le volcan Asama, un édifice haut de 2568 m au nord-ouest du district de Kanto, au centre du Japon, est l’un des strato-volcans quaternaires les plus actifs du Japon. Les dépôts, qui sont exposés de façon continue le long de la vallée actuelle jusqu’à 90–100 km de la source, ont été corrélés entre eux par plusieurs chercheurs et auteurs (Aramaki, 1963 ; Unozawa and Sakamoto, 1972 ; Nakamura et al., 1997 ; Takemoto and Kubo, 2003).

Les lithofaciès des dépôts de l’effondrement sectoriel, inventoriés et décrits le long du trajet à partir du flanc nord du volcan Asama, dépendent de la distance de transport depuis la source. Sur un affleurement pourtant situé dans l’angle nord-ouest de la plaine du Kanto, les dépôts liés à l’avalanche restent massifs, sans tri, et ils contiennent de grands blocs fragiles (fig. 2) ainsi qu’une matrice composée de clastes de tailles variées et de fragments de bois, similaires à ceux décrits dans les études des dépôts les plus typiques des avalanches de débris (Ui, 1983 ; Siebert, 1984). Nos observations indiquent qu’un écoulement unique, mû par la gravité a transporté le matériel jusqu’au secteur nord-occidental de la plaine du Kanto au cours d’une période de temps extrêmement courte et dans des conditions où la température de mise en place n’était pas élevée. D’après les coupes transversales topographiques et géologiques (fig. 3), il existe une différence remarquable entre les altitudes relatives de la surface du dépôt dans la vallée de la rivière Agatsuma. Au contraire, le profil transversal de la surface du dépôt est plat dans le secteur nord-ouest de la plaine du Kanto. Ceci suggère que l’écoulement volcanoclastique s’est écrasé violemment sur les parois de la vallée de la rivière Agatsuma à une distance de transport de 50 km environ. La différence d’altitude relative entre le contact (la base) et le toit (surface) des dépôts de l’effondrement sectoriel est plus grande dans la vallée de la rivière Agatsuma mais plus petite dans le coin NW de la plaine de Kanto. D’après les modifications longitudinales des caractéristiques géomorphologiques le long des cours des rivières actuelles (fig. 4), le gradient longitudinal de la vallée, antérieure à l’effondrement, était plus raide que l’actuel et la pente du chenal décroît brutalement dans le secteur NW de la plaine du Kanto. De même, la largeur de la vallée s’accroît brutalement dans cette zone du Kanto. Ainsi, les modifications longitudinales de la différence de hauteur relative correspondent bien aux variations de la largeur de la vallée. Ceci signifie que l’écoulement s’est étalé latéralement au fur et à mesure que la vallée s’élargissait à l’arrivée dans la plaine de Kanto et que la rivière Agatsuma a agi comme un corridor permettant le passage de l’écoulement du matériel.

Notre étude démontre que les débris issus d’un effondrement sectoriel peuvent être transportés au moins jusqu’à 90-100 km lorsque les sédiments sont canalisés dans une vallée en pente forte et en forme de V. Autour des volcans d’arc, la répartition du matériel de ces écoulements dépend de la topographie de la zone dans laquelle s’initie l’effondrement brutal sur le volcan. Nous soulignons ici la nécessité de réexaminer le contexte régional des strato-volcans, en particulier sur les arcs volcaniques insulaires, dans la perspective d’évaluer les effets de la topographie régionale sur le transport d’avalanches de débris volumineuses sur une grande distance.

Haut de page

Table des illustrations

Titre Fig. 1 – Shaded relief map of the region of the study area showing the distribution of deposits derived from the sector collapse of Asama volcano (modified after Yoshida and Sugai, 2007).Fig. 1 – Carte en relief de la région étudiée montrant la distribution des débris provenant de l’effondrement de flanc du volcan Asama (modifiée d’après Yoshida et Sugai, 2007).
Légende 1: locations in fig. 2; 2: cross sections in fig. 3; 3: presumed distribution of deposits.1 : localisations sur la fig. 2 ; 2 : coupes sur la fig. 3 ; 3 : répartition supposée des débris.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/3702/img-1.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 404k
Titre Fig. 2 – Representative lithofacies of the sector collapse deposits of Asama volcano.Fig. 2 – Lithofaciès représentatifs des débris de l’effondrement de secteur du volcan Asama.
Légende Locations of exposures are shown in fig. 1.La localisation des affleurements est indiquée sur la fig. 1.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/3702/img-2.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 320k
Titre Fig. 3 –Topographic and geological cross sections (modified after Yoshida, 2004a and b).Fig. 3 – Coupes topographiques et géologiques (modifiées d’après Yoshida, 2004 a et b).
Légende 1: width of valley; 2: relative height difference; 3: borehole; 4: bedrock; 5: gravel layer (before event); 6: gravel layer (after event); 7: deposits derived from the event.1 : largeur de vallée dans la zone de dépôt ; 2 : différences de hauteur relative entre la surfaceet la base du dépôt ; 3 : forage ; 4 : substrat ; 5 : couche de graviers (avant l’effondrement) ; 6 : couche de graviers (après l’effondrement) ; 7 : débris provenant de l’effondrement de flanc du volcan Asama.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/3702/img-3.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 388k
Titre Fig. 4 – Longitudinal changes of geomorphological characteristics along the Agatsuma-Tone River valleys.Fig. 4 – Évolution longitudinale des caractéristiques géomorphologiques le long des vallées des rivières Agatsuma et Tone.
Légende A: longitudinal profiles of the present river bed and the depositional and basal surfaces of the event-related deposits from Asama volcano (modified after Yoshida et al., 2006); B: average channel slope of the basal surface at ca. 24 ka; C: width of the valley within the depositional area; D: relative height difference between the depositional and basal surfaces.A : profils longitudinaux du lit actuel de la rivière et surfaces de dépôt et de base des débris se rapportant à l’événement du volcan Asama (modifié d’après Yoshida et al., 2006) ; B : pente moyenne du chenal de la surface de base de 24 ka ; C : largeur de vallée dans la zone de dépôt ; D : différences de hauteur relative entre la surface des dépôts et leur base.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/3702/img-4.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 280k
Titre Fig. 5 – Presumed flow behavior in the Nakanojo and Komochi regions and the impact on the existing fluvial terrace at Komochi, indicating erosion of top soil and loam from the ground surface along the main route of the flow (modified after Yoshida and Sugai, 2005; Yoshida et al. 2005). The assumed main part of the flow is schematically shown by the large arrows.Fig. 5 – Comportement présumé de l’écoulement dans les régions de Nakanojo et Komochi et impact sur la terrasse fluviatile de Komochi, indiquant l’érosion de la terre végétale et du limon le long de la trajectoire principale de l’écoulement (modifié d’après Yoshida et Sugai, 2005 ; Yoshida et al., 2005). La partie principale supposée de l’écoulement est matérialisée schématiquement par les plus grandes flèches.
Légende 1: depositional surface on the existing terraces; 2: depositional area; 3: assumed flow direction.1 : surface de dépôt sur la terrasse fluviatile ; 2 : zone de dépôt ; 3 : direction supposée de l’écoulement.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/3702/img-5.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 428k
Titre Fig. 6 – Distribution of sand and silt between the Maebashi Gravel layer and the event-related deposits of Asama volcano in the northwestern corner of the Kanto Plain, interpreted from borehole column data.Fig. 6 – Répartition des sables et des silts entre la couche de graviers Maebashi et les débris liés à l’événement du volcan Asama, à l’extrémité nord-ouest de la plaine de Kanto, interprétée à partir de données de forages.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/3702/img-6.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 196k
Haut de page

Pour citer cet article

Référence papier

Hidetsugu Yoshida et Toshihiko Sugai, « Topographical control of large-scale sediment transport by a river valley during the 24 ka sector collapse of Asama volcano, Japan », Géomorphologie : relief, processus, environnement, vol. 13 - n° 3 | 2007, 217-224.

Référence électronique

Hidetsugu Yoshida et Toshihiko Sugai, « Topographical control of large-scale sediment transport by a river valley during the 24 ka sector collapse of Asama volcano, Japan », Géomorphologie : relief, processus, environnement [En ligne], vol. 13 - n° 3 | 2007, mis en ligne le 01 octobre 2009, consulté le 24 septembre 2017. URL : http://geomorphologie.revues.org/3702 ; DOI : 10.4000/geomorphologie.3702

Haut de page

Droits d’auteur

© Groupe français de géomorphologie

Haut de page
  • Logo CNRS - Institut des sciences humaines et sociales
  • Logo Groupe français de géomorphologie
  • Revues.org