Navigation – Plan du site

Late Holocene sedimentary forcing and human settlements in the Jerf el Oustani - Ras el Sass region (Banc d’Arguin, Mauritania)

Occupation humaine et forçages sédimentaires à l’Holocène final dans la région de Jerf el Oustani - Ras el Sass (Banc d’Arguin, Mauritanie)
Jean-Paul Barusseau, Robert Vernet, Jean-François Saliège et Cyr Descamps

Résumés

L’étude de la région de Ras el Sass et Jerf el Oustani (zone littorale du banc d’Arguin en Mauritanie), a permis : 1°) l’identification, la localisation et la datation directe ou indirecte des amas coquilliers, et 2°) la reconstruction des étapes de la formation de la zone littorale par colmatage du paléo-estuaire de l’oued ech Chibka, entre 5 500 ans BP et l’Actuel. Les amas coquilliers ont été cartographiés à partir des images satellitaires géoréférencées et datés par le radiocarbone ou la typologie des tessons archéologiques. De 5 500 à 2 600 ans BP, les lignes de rivages successives sont marquées par des alignements d’amas qui en suivent la progradation. Les conditions biotiques dans la baie estuarienne sont favorables au développement d’Anadara, principal organisme exploité par les populations néolithiques. De façon complémentaire, l’analyse morphologique et sédimentologique des bermes, laisses de mer et cordons littoraux rencontrés rend compte des processus actifs mis en oeuvre dans la régularisation du trait de côte. Au cours des différentes étapes, les dépôts se conforment aux plans de vagues successifs imposés par l’évolution de la morphologie. Les formes et la nature des dépôts observés ainsi que leur répartition verticale ne permettent pas de retenir l’hypothèse d’un niveau marin à 2 ou 2,5 m au-dessus du niveau marin actuel depuis 5 500 ans BP. Le forçage sédimentaire apparaît le facteur le plus important.

Haut de page

Errata

Article soumis le 1er juin 2006, accepté le 15 février 2007.

Notes de la rédaction

Acknowledgements
This study would not have been possible without the help of a number of organisations and researchers. In Mauritania, we thank both the authorities at the Banc d’Arguin National Park for granting access to the site and the Mauritanian Institute of Scientific Research for their assistance. We also wish to thank Françoise Descamps and Pierre Estrade for their help in the field, Jade Creuseveau for aid with the satellite imagery and Olivier Rüe for his advice. Paolo Pirazzoli, Edward Anthony, Yanni Gunnell, and an anonymous reviewer are thanked for their constructive comments.

Texte intégral

Introduction

1An important date in the morphodynamic history of Mauritania’s Atlantic coast is the arrival of the post-glacial sea at, or in the vicinity of its current level. This event took place between 6000 and 5000 years B.P. During the millennia that followed, the sea level varied very little, whereas the coastal area underwent considerable changes, marked by the formation of large deltas and lagoons, and more generally, a regularisation of the coastline through the reworking of sediment tracts.

2The factors involved in this redistribution include hypothetical sea-level variations, local or regional crustal movements, and the reworking of sediment stocks by coastal processes. Each of these factors is subject to natural and anthropogenic forcings. The purpose of this article is to establish a hierarchy of factors involved in the evolution of a site situated on the Banc d’Arguin coast in West Africa.

Study area

3The coast of Mauritania is lined by sandy beaches or mud and sand tidal flats. Rocky areas are located in the north of the country around Lévrier Bay, (fig. 1) and also appear as rare promontories that form capes (‘Ras’) along the shores of the Banc d’Arguin (Barusseau, 1985), vast shallow (<20 m) marine expanse covering some 7500 km2 (150 km from north to south; 100 km from east to west). Mahé (1985) describes this area as a lagoon-marine system, the legacy of an ‘undoubtedly deltaic past’ shaped by numerous channels and shoals. The boundary areas testify to this complex evolution. The Ras el Sass - Jerf el Oustani - Îmgoutene area (fig. 1) was formerly the site of an estuarine bay where the Oued ech Chibka, now completely dried up, reached the sea. A similar situation is observed in the neighbouring Oued el Atoui, already described by Chudeau (1921).

Fig. 1 – Location map of the study area
Fig. 1 – Situation de la région étudiée

Fig. 1 – Location map of the study area Fig. 1 – Situation de la région étudiée

A: R.I Mauritania in West Africa; B: Banc d'Arguin area in NW Mauritania; C: Estuarine bay of Oued ech Chibka; D: Study area
A: R.I. de Mauritanie en Afrique de l’Ouest; B: le secteur du banc d’Arguin en R.I.M.; C: la baie estuarienne de l’Oued ech Chibka; D: secteur étudié.

4Flat, low topographies (under 10 m) appear on the boundaries and inside the former estuarine bays, now filled by thick tracts of sand. Three main landscape units can be identified, namely boundary reliefs in the north, isolated massifs on the sandy plain (Jerf el Oustani, Jerf Sgheir) and peninsulas (Ras el Sass). These landscapes bear witness to a Quaternary formation, initially considered part of the region’s Quaternary marine record, the Tafaritian (Hébrard, 1973, 1978; Elouard, 1975), but since shown to be a continental, alluvial lakeside or sebkha formation, of an undetermined age (Giresse et al., 1989). A part of these Tafaritian reliefs formed islands when the continental shelf in this area was transgressed during the mid-Holocene.

5The observed tide is semi-diurnal and microtidal, with a range between 0.8 and 2 m (Mahé, 1985; Koopmann et al., 1979). The relatively flat bathymetry of Banc d’Arguin exposes considerable coastal flats at low tide, where the intertidal area can reach 600 km2 (Mahé, 1985).

6The swell is attenuated by Cap Blanc and the shallow bathymetry of the Banc. The dominant longshore drift runs south as shown by the numerous south-trending sand spits in this area (Barusseau, 1985). The spits also show the existence of a sedimentary conveyor fed in particular by the discharge of barkhan lines that trend SSW. Aeolian processes account for the onshore movement of these sandy masses, several metres in height and several dozen metres in length and width. These sandy masses feed on the imposing dunes formed during the period of base-level rise (post-glacial transgression) in the continental domain (Deynoux et al., 1991).

7A particular characteristic of the Banc d’Arguin coastal region is the presence of Neolithic shell middens. These have yielded abundant archaeological material consisting of pottery fragments and small tools, as well as remains of Anadara senilis, the main mollusc exploited by ancient human populations living in the Gulf. These middens and their archaeological content have been described in several studies (Amblard et al., 1990; Barusseau et al., 1995; Vernet, 1998; Descamps and Vernet, 2001; Vernet et al., 2001; Vernet and Ould Mohamed Naffé, 2003; Vernet and Tous, 2004; Vernet et al., 2004). The Neolithic populations exploiting A. senilis drew the resource from proximal tidal flats and subaerial coastal areas, where they could cook the heavy shells to extract the flesh. Owing to these two aspects of their work, ancient populations were geographically tied to the area’s seaboard.

8Other locations of coastal features are indicated in the Jerf el Oustani - Ras el Sass region by two sets of concentric lines (fig. 2), one that straddles the north cliff of Jerf el Oustani, the other joining the eastern cliff of Ras el Sass.

Fig. 2 – The two sets of nested berms (IGN–AOF 100, 1954)
Fig. 2 – Les deux ensembles de bermes emboîtées (d’après photo IGN–AOF 100, 1954).

Fig. 2 – The two sets of nested berms (IGN–AOF 100, 1954)Fig. 2 – Les deux ensembles de bermes emboîtées (d’après photo IGN–AOF 100, 1954).

9Our research methodology has been aimed at tying up the archaeological data with the sedimentological findings.

Methodology

10In the study area, 143 shell middens were located using GPS (fig. 3) and their archaeological content rapidly analysed by visual observation and description of superficial remains. Four of the middens were fully excavated down to the Tafaritian substratum. The successive shell layers were removed by scraping 5 cm thick layers over the entire excavation area (2 x 1.5 m). A sample of the elements contained in each layer was sieved using a 2 cm mesh, yielding a suite of material including shells for radiocarbon dating, decorated fragments, microlithic quartz tools and various remains of organisms, in particular fish vertebra and otoliths. At one of the sites, a copper awl was recovered.

Fig. 3 – Location of the investigated and excavated shell-middens.
Fig. 3 – Position des amas coquilliers identifiés et fouillés

Fig. 3 – Location of the investigated and excavated shell-middens.Fig. 3 – Position des amas coquilliers identifiés et fouillés

(Tafaritian outcrops denoted in grey)
(affleurements tafaritiens en gris).

11The archaeological remains can be used as dating elements in the well known context of the Mauritanian Neolithic (Vernet, 1998; Vernet and Ould Mohamed Naffé, 2003). Three large groups of evidence have been identified (fig. 4). The oldest remains belong to a period prior to 5000 B.P and are far less abundant than fragments from the following millennium. The latter belong to the “Tasiast ensemble” which is widespread in the region, in particular the Tintan culture, dated at ca. 4500-4300 B.P. Human presence is finally documented up to about 2600 years B.P. by a third group, represented by pottery shards and copper elements. A clear distinction can be drawn between older groups that had not mastered copper metallurgy, and more recent ones that had. This pattern was confirmed by 14C datings we undertook during the study.

Fig. 4 – Chronological data based on pottery shard typology.
Fig. 4 – Chronologie archéologique fondée sur la typologie des tessons.

Fig. 4 – Chronological data based on pottery shard typology.Fig. 4 – Chronologie archéologique fondée sur la typologie des tessons.

12The geomorphology of coastal features identified on aerial photographs (fig. 2) was studied in the field. The surfaces in the study area are extremely flat but, in the field, numerous active barkhans prevent an overall view of the topography. On the large expanses of the former estuarine bay, it is also very difficult to gauge the precise topography of the very low slopes. A topographic profile of more than 4 km was therefore carried out using a total station, so as to establish an altimetric benchmark for sandy surfaces and locate palaeo-shorelines relative to mean sea level. At the same time, the tidal range was measured during spring tide by plotting the low and high tide levels. Contrary to the monospecific anthropogenic accumulations, an examination of the fauna contained in the natural deposits shows various shallow marine species in life position. Shell samples recovered in these sediments were 14C dated.

Results

Archaeological results

13A first observation stems from the precise positioning of the middens using GPS. They are generally arranged along lines linked to the progradation of the estuarine bay. We hypothesize that each midden broadly retraces the position of the coastline at each phase of occupation. The shell middens studied were grouped according to Vernet and Ould Mohamed Naffé (2003). The dating results (tab. 1) have confirmed these attributions while more precisely constraining details of the human occupation of the coastal boundaries.

Table 1 – Shell midden radiocarbon dates.
Tableau 1 – Datations au 14C d’éléments des amas coquilliers.

Table 1 – Shell midden radiocarbon dates.Tableau 1 – Datations au 14C d’éléments des amas coquilliers.

14Thus, the site of Jerf Sgheïr (fig. 1) testifies to an early occupation of a relatively remote point of the Tafaritian elevation occupied around 5000 years B.P. The high position of this small plateau rendered it particularly attractive for human occupation. Below the eastern side of Jerf Sgheïr, two small middens in the south and the north show Tintan culture archaeology. The radiocarbon dates, between 4500 and 4000 years B.P. confirm this chronology.

15The pattern of human occupation (fig. 5) shows that, prior to 5000 years B.P., no middens were formed in the estuarine bay; they were all situated on the edge of the Tafaritian steep slopes or on the dunes. An initial incursion in the bay occurred around 4900 years B.P., shown by the midden at Jerf Sgheïr, rich in fish debris (vertebra and otoliths), and its position making it possible to exploit coastal habitats. The remains of the Tintan culture are more widely distributed after this time. Accretion of the isthmus made it possible to reach Jerf Sgheïr after 4900 years BP. The sediment deposits were formed in the direction of the Jerf el Oustani plateau, separating the estuarine bay in its eastern part. The estuary was still connected to Oued ech Chibka and a marine bay to the west, largely open to the sea, in spite of the shielding role afforded by Cape el Sass. This pattern became more pronounced in both parts, which remained separated until ca. 3200-3300 years B.P. with numerous indications of a recent Neolithic occupation (fig. 5). After this, the trend was to build middens in the south and south-west of the eastern bay and in the western bay. These occupy positions that coincide in part with the locations of the palaeo-shorelines (cf. infra). The end of human occupation, ca. 2700-2600 years B.P., marked by the copper awl at site 25, does not indicate a greater extension of alluvial deposits and related shoreline forms. This extension can only be based on the morphology of landforms.

Fig. 5 – Location of shell-midden alignments on sand spit or beach ridges, showing human occupation of successive palaeoshorelines.
Fig. 5 – Situation des alignements d'amas coquilliers sur les flèches et cordons littoraux, montrant les occupations successives des paléorivages.

Fig. 5 – Location of shell-midden alignments on sand spit or beach ridges, showing human occupation of successive palaeoshorelines. Fig. 5 – Situation des alignements d'amas coquilliers sur les flèches et cordons littoraux, montrant les occupations successives des paléorivages.

1: No 14C ages; ages older than 5000 years B.P. according to archaeology; 2: Jerf Sgheïr shell midden, 4900 years B.P.; 3: Tintan group, 4600-4000 years B.P.; 4: Last Neolithic groups, 3300 years B.P.; 5: Copper Age groups, 2700-2600 years B.P.; 6: unknown ages, no shards, no dates.
1: absences de dates 14C; plus ancien que 5 000 ans BP d'après l'archéologie; 2: amas coquillier de Jerf Sgheïr, 4 900 ans BP; 3: groupe « Tintan », 4 600-4 000 ans BP; 4: derniers groupes du Néolithique, 3 300 ans BP; 5: groupes de l'âge du cuivre, 2 700-2 600 ans BP; 6: âges inconnus, ni tessons, ni datations.

1614C dating was carried out at Jerf Sgheïr and site 25 (tab. 1), using Anadara shells and charcoal. The values are very close (3360 and 3215 yrs B.P.), without any notable reservoir effect.

Sedimentological results

17The general layout of the Tafaritian reliefs delineates an open palaeo-bay in which a number of islands played an important role in the morphodynamic evolution of the sedimentary filling.

18Observations in the field have shown that the palaeo-shorelines interpreted on aerial photos were actually berm accumulations forming ridges some 20 to 30 cm high and twenty metres wide, and trending eastwards. These sand accumulations define the progradation of palaeoshorelines, corresponding to the beach berm. They are accompanied by various marine fossils indicating a coastal origin (molluscs, crabs, fish or turtle bones, etc.). They are found in the form of dozens of nested shorelines that join Jerf el Oustani and a long arched bar (excavation site 25), in a west-to-east direction, and resting on the south-east boundary of the plateau. This morphology resembles a tombolo that joins the former island of Jerf el Oustani to the continent. For the more recent palaeoshorelines studied, vegetal debris is also observed, lining low high-water marks, and likewise delineating a tombolo at Ras el Sass.

19These different lines have formed on a sandy plain and are organised in concentric arcs, the general altitude of which is moderate (less than 1 metre above mean sea level). The overall topography of the estuarine bay (including beach berms) therefore lies in the tidal range based on present sea level (fig. 6), apart from a low beach ridge along the present shore and the current high barkhans not represented on the profile. As in the case of the berms, the fauna is characteristic of beaches and shallow coastal bottoms. Abundance and homogeneous spatial distribution indicate that the shells are in situ and not reworked.

Fig. 6 – Cross-shore topographic profile showing the entire sand flat within the current tidal range.
Fig. 6 – Profil topographique transversal totalement inscrit dans le marnage actuel.

Fig. 6 – Cross-shore topographic profile showing the entire sand flat within the current tidal range. Fig. 6 – Profil topographique transversal totalement inscrit dans le marnage actuel.

HTSL/LTSL: high-tide and low-tide sea level.
HTSL/LTSL: niveaux de haute mer et de basse mer, respectivement.

Table 2 – Radiocarbon dating of the palaeo-berms.
Tableau 2 – Datations au 14C de coquilles des paléobermes.

Table 2 – Radiocarbon dating of the palaeo-berms.Tableau 2 – Datations au 14C de coquilles des paléobermes.

20The dating of berm shell material attests to relatively young ages (tab. 2). After this time, Neolithic populations deserted the region because of deterioration in living conditions. Occupation of site 25 by the last Chalcolithic populations is contemporary with the beginning of berm construction, which is at the origin of the final infilling of Jerf el Oustani bay.

Interpretation and discussion

Main results

21The data and observations, as well as the chronological framework provided by the archaeology and radiocarbon dates, make it possible to reconstruct the morphodynamic evolution of Jerf el Oustani’s estuarine bay and the human occupation of its shores during the Neolithic and Chalcolithic.

22From a morphodynamic point of view, the layout of the bay’s Tafaritian shores and the pre-existing insular massifs restricted any subsequent evolution after the Holocene transgression. The regional oceanographic context can be presumed to have been established during this period, with a regime of dominant swell from the west or the north-west; under such conditions, various inevitable consequences ensued (fig. 7). First, easterly coastal drift developed on the north coast of Îmgoutene, completed by the formation of sedimentary spits where the rock promontory changed orientation. Subsequently, swell refraction and diffraction around the islands generated wave shadows that were conducive to the formation of tombolos.

Fig. 7 – Oblique view of proposed palaeo-hydro/morphodynamic processes in the former Oued ech Chibka bay.
Fig. 7 – Vue oblique montrant le schéma proposé des processus hydro- et morphodynamiques en action dans l’ancienne baie estuarienne de l’Oued ech Chibka.

Fig. 7 – Oblique view of proposed palaeo-hydro/morphodynamic processes in the former Oued ech Chibka bay. Fig. 7 – Vue oblique montrant le schéma proposé des processus hydro- et morphodynamiques en action dans l’ancienne baie estuarienne de l’Oued ech Chibka.

1: dominant wave regime; 2: northern longshore drift active during the beginning of the period; 3 and 4: refracted wave fronts and associated orthogonals; 5 a and b: successive tombolos formed in the wave shadow of the islands; 6: Oued ech Chibka sediment input.
1: houles dominantes; 2: action de la dérive littorale en début de période; 3 et 4: réfraction des fronts de houles et orthogonales associées; 5 a et b: tombolos successifs formés à l’abri des îles; 6: direction des apports de l’Oued ech Chibka)

23These phenomena occurred under contexts of high sediment supply. It appears that the fluvial inputs of Oued ech Chibka and the dune sands (Deynoux et al., 1991) supplied significant sediment volumes to the coastal zone.

Fig. 8 – Successive stages in the construction of the sand flat.
Fig. 8 – Étapes successives de la formation du sand flat.

Fig. 8 – Successive stages in the construction of the sand flat. Fig. 8 – Étapes successives de la formation du sand flat.

1: development of the spit joining Jerf Sgheïr; 2 and 3: beginning of the Oued ech Chibka infilling; 4: formation of the Jerf el Oustani tombolo; 5: rapid filling of the northern and southern bays either side of Jerf el Oustani tombolo; 6: formation of the Ras el Sass tombolo and sand flat completion.
1: développement de la flèche sédimentaire rejoignant Jerf Sgheïr; 2 et 3: début du colmatage; 4: formation du tombolo de Jerf el Oustani; 5: régularisation rapide des baies au nord et au sud; 6: formation du tombolo de Ras el Sass et régularisation du trait de côte.

24The geomorphology evolved in six phases (fig. 8), beginning with an early occupation phase of the high shores, prior to 5000 years B.P.

251. Under the action of the W-E coastal drift on the shores of Îmgoutene, the sediments transported to the east were blocked by the northern cliff. A spit developed, which rapidly joined the neighbouring island of Jerf Sgheïr. A group or groups of humans settled on the peninsula and exploited the Anadara to form the 4900 B.P. midden.

262. Shelter afforded by the spit to the east eventually culminated in it’s infilling, fed notably by alluvial sand deposits from the Oued ech Chibka. Between 4900 and 4600 years B.P., human groups established middens on beaches below Jerf Sgheïr. These eastern bay beaches were well protected and lay outside the zone of high storm waters.

273. A subsequent phase is evidenced by middens that testify to the continued silting up of the eastern bay. This phase is constrained by the 4435 B.P. Anadara shells.

284. Up to ca. 3200 years B.P., alluvial deposits accumulated and contributed to the formation of the first tombolo at Jerf el Oustani. At the end of this phase, the old estuarine bay was divided into two bays on either side of the tombolo.

295. The bar has been dated to 2900 years B.P. To the south and on the northern boundary of the tombolo of Jerf el Oustani, the bay was gradually filled in. This phase seems to have been rapid: to the north, the berms dated ca. 2700 years B.P. and advanced by about 1 km within 5 to 7 centuries (between 3200-3300 years BP and ca. 2600-2700 years BP). At the beginning of this phase, the last Anadara-collecting populations settled on the highest bars. The same climatic deterioration that led to their departure may also account for increased sedimentary inputs by aeolian processes (“Tafolian” according to Hébrard, 1978).

306. The final episode culminated in the currently prevalent geomorphological setting. It has not been dated, either archaeologically or radiometrically. It is nonetheless documented by abundant beach forms that mark the progradation of a second tombolo behind El Sass, before a gradual regularisation of the coastline to the north and south of this breakwater obstacle. A comparison of IGN aerial photographs from 1954 and satellite images taken during the 1990s indicates that these coastlines continue to evolve today. The beach has prograded by about 300 to 400 m along the cliff of Ras el Sass, whereas the western cliff of Jerf el Oustani, active in 1954, has become fossilised, separated from the sea by a beach more than 100 m wide (fig. 9).

Fig. 9 – Recent stages of the shaping of the shoreline. 1954: IGN photograph; 1990s: satellite image.
Fig. 9 – Étapes récentes de la régularisation du trait de côte. 1954: photo IGN; années 1990: image satellitaire.

Fig. 9 – Recent stages of the shaping of the shoreline. 1954: IGN photograph; 1990s: satellite image.Fig. 9 – Étapes récentes de la régularisation du trait de côte. 1954: photo IGN; années 1990: image satellitaire.

Relative influences of eustasy and sedimentary forcing

31The sequence of deposits formed during the silting up of the estuarine bay attests to a dynamic system, the spatial and temporal evolution of which is governed by a balance between three allocyclic factors (Vail et al., 1977): variations in sea level, crustal deformation, and sediment budgets. The first of these factors is of general scope; the entire variation of sea level occurs at oceanic scale. The second involves substrate loading, in general in a remote past, whether positive or negative epirogenic movements or the coseismicity resulting from known tectonic features (Pirazzoli et al., 1994). Sediment compaction (subsidence) is difficult to quantify but can be apprehended by other methods (Pirazzoli, 1998). The third factor is more circumstantial, resulting from the interplay between climate and hydrology. In terms of frequency, sea-level variation comes into play at a medium temporal and low spatial frequencies, crustal deformation occurs at a low temporal and medium spatial frequencies, and parameters relating to sediment budgets at both high temporal and spatial frequencies. The first factor is often used to explain the architecture of late Holocene coastal deposits.

32In the Jerf el Oustani region, the issue is limited, in fact, to determining the relative weight between two factors: eustasy and sediment infilling. The area is situated on the West African passive margin and, although there are indicators of crustal mobility in the region, these are generally limited to subsidence in the region of the Senegal River delta (Monteillet, 1986). To explain it, Faure and Hebrard (1977) and Faure et al. (1980) also consider hydro-isostatic residues, the influence of which is favoured by the lower resistance of the crust at this level.

33Lithospheric stability otherwise prevails elsewhere (Einsele et al., 1974, 1977a and b; Amblard et al., 1990). Furthermore, accumulations of Eemian age near current sea level on the oyster rock (Ostraea stentina) of El Hadjra to the south of the Banc d’Arguin (‘Inchirian’ of Elouard, 1975), as well as the recent discovery of an oyster bed under the ‘Nouakchottian beach’ near the Ras Iwik close to present MSL confirm this hypothesis. Further to the south, the observations of the Cap des Biches (Diouf, 1989; Diouf et al., 1995), where the Eemian shoreline is encountered at a low altitude (~1 m) above sea level, show that this stability can be extrapolated to the entire Senegalo-Mauritanian sedimentary basin and at a temporal scale that straddles the Holocene.

34Under these conditions, the discussion is limited to determining which of these two factors, i.e. eustasy or sediment filling, played the most significant role. Faure and Elouard (1967) only considered the combined influences of eustatic and epeirogenic factors, and completely neglected the sedimentological parameters.

35First, it is noted that the sediment reservoir was considerable throughout this period. The creation and redistribution of sands can be considered from three perspectives. During the entire glacial phase, corresponding to dry periods (Sarnthein and Walger, 1974; Williams, 1975; Beaudet et al., 1976; Sarnthein, 1978; Stein et Sarnthein, 1983) abundant material was supplied by crystalline outcrops situated to the east. The voluminous ergs that resulted extended not only to the current coastline (‘Ogolian’; Michel, 1977) but also onto the exposed continental shelf, and in particular across the entire Banc d’Arguin and beyond. This material was subsequently reworked during the post-glacial transgression, and part of it contributed to the formation of successive beach ridges. The third point is undoubtedly the most important, because it is contemporary to all the deposits that led to the infilling of the estuarine bay. It resulted from alternating humid and arid phases during the course of which the previous sand deposits were reworked. These climatic phenomena led to the superposition of dune systems separated by complex surfaces of erosion or paraconformities, or even surfaces of non-deposition (Deynoux et al., 1991; Kocurek et al., 1991) corresponding to humid phases. The most important one took place between 10,000 and 3000 years B.P. and forms supersurface I at Akchar (Ould Ahmed Benan, 1991). During the arid phases, the dunes were remobilised on the vast system of Ogolian ergs, in particular during the Tafolian episode (Hébrard, 1973, 1978). Consequently, we have the transport agents (fluvial systems during humid phases, wind during the arid phases) and the abundant sand material that they remobilised throughout the period. This mechanism is still observed at present with the imposing lines of barkhans that carry the sands towards the SSW and discharge them in the sea, where they are reworked by the coastal drift. Since sea level reached its present position, the morphodynamic evolution has been controlled by swell waves, leading to the emplacement of the coastal features observed today.

36The question arises as to whether any positive and/or negative variations in sea level occurred during the silting up phase of the estuarine bay. Such variations have frequently been cited to explain the architecture of the deposits (Faure and Elouard, 1967; Einsele et al., 1974, 1977b; Monteillet et al., 1981; Médus, 1987; Barusseau et al., 1989; Deynoux et al., 1991; Vernet and Tous, 2004). The observations reported here do not seem to require any marked variation in sea level. Furthermore, such sea-level variations are not presently demonstrable from the available data. The arguments against any real sea-level variation effect on the geomorphic evolution deduced from the various datasets concern: (1) the altitude of the deposits, (2) the absence of erosion, and (3) a classic progradation pattern. The altitude of all the identified deposits (beaches or beach berms) is consistent with the current tidal range. It should also be borne in mind that the coastal sand prism is subjected to storms that raise the maximum tidal level. This means that deposits of up to + 2 m above MSL can be compatible with the present level in the Ras el Sass – Jerf el Oustani region. No erosion has been observed. In theory, this should have accompanied the hypothetical regressive movements. Finally, the infilling deposits show a classic progradation tendency, with the oldest deposits being furthest from the sea. Better chronological resolution would assist in quantifying the rate of coastal progradation. It does appear, however, that it was particularly rapid after 3000 years B.P. This rapidity could account for the good preservation of the berms to the west of the Jerf el Oustani tombolo.

Conclusion

37The morphodynamic study of the late Holocene evolution of Ras el Sass – Jerf el Oustani was conducted using a double archaeological and sedimentological approach. The archaeology yielded a robust chronological framework for the different Neolithic cultures. The shell middens built by these societies served both as chronological markers and as evidence of the position of successive palaeoshorelines. This geomorphological study completes our understanding of the area’s morphodynamic evolution. This comprises different phases, evolving from an open estuarine bay during the maximum marine ingression to a regularised coastline and silted up palaeobay at present.

38The geomorphology has essentially been driven by high sediment supply to the coastal zone (fluvio-aeolian sands) and the redistributing action of coastal processes.

39The sedimentary filling stages include the accretion of a coastal spit between the Tafaritian cliff at Îmgoutene towards the Isle of Jerf Sgheïr, then by the progradation of two tombolos formed in succession at Jerf el Oustani and at Ras el Sass. Between these two episodes, evidence of rapid infilling between 3000 and 2700 years B.P. is consistent with the last phase of human occupation in the region.

40In the absence of a significant tectonic component, relative sea-level changes during the past 5000 years do not account for the observed changes in the Ras el Sass – Jerf el Oustani area. It is possible that changes of limited (centimetric) scope could have occurred, but these did not reach 1 to 2 m in height. Conversely, the sedimentary forcing caused by (1) the abundance of sand resources throughout the period, (2) the existence of limited yet stable accommodation space and, (3) the continued presence of an active coastal dynamic, explain the pattern of coastal geomorphology elucidated in this study.

Haut de page

Bibliographie

Amblard S., Aumassip G., Bathily M., Ferhat N., Ould Khattar M., Tauveron M. (1990) – L’occupation humaine et les formations géologiques récentes du Tijirit méridional. Annales de la Faculté des Lettres et Sciences Humaines de Nouakchott, 2, 34-53.

Barusseau J.-P. (1985) – Évolution de la ligne de rivage en république islamique de Mauritanie. Unesco, Division des Sciences de la Mer, unpublished report, Contract sc 217.614.4, 104 p.

Barusseau J.-P., Ba M., Descamps C., Diop E.H.S., Giresse P., Saos J.L. (1995) – Coastal evolution in Senegal and Mauritania at 103, 102 and 101 year scales. Natural and human records. Quaternary International 29/30, 61-73.

Barusseau J.-P., Descamps C., Giresse P., Monteillet J., Pazdur M. (1989) – Nouvelle définition des niveaux marins le long de la côte nord-mauritanienne (sud du Banc d’Arguin) pendant les cinq derniers millénaires. Comptes Rendus Académie des Sciences, Paris, 309, II, 1019-1024.

Beaudet G. Michel P., Nahon D., Oliva P., Riser J., Ruellan A. (1976) – Formes, formations superficielles et variations climatiques récentes du Sahara occidental. Revue de Géographie Physique et Géologie Dynamique, 18, 2/3, 157-174.

Chudeau R. (1921) – L’hydrographie ancienne du Sahara; ses conséquences biogéographiques. Revue Scientifique, 8, 193-198.

Descamps C., Vernet R. (2001) – Kjokkenmodding ou sambaqui ? Le site Aramad de l’île d’Arguin (Mauritanie). Actes du 11e Congrès Panafricain de Préhistoire, Bamako, thème 6, 141-152.

Deynoux M., Proust J.-N., Simon B. (1991) – Relations entre géométrie, association de faciès, discontinuité et variation du niveau de base dans la zone de transition entre domaines marin et continental. Journal of African Earth Sciences 12, 181-198.

Diouf B., Giresse P., Ochietti S., Clausse C., Pichet P. (1995) – A petrological and geochemical study of the calcareous sandstone of West Africa marine Pleistocene (Cap de Biches, Sénégal). Quaternary International 29/30, 49-60.

Diouf M.B. (1989) – Sédimentologie, Minéralogie et Géochimie des grès carbonatés quaternaires du littoral sénégalo-mauritanien. Thèse de l’université de Perpignan, 237 p.

Einsele G., Elouard P., Herm D., Kögler F.C., Schwartz H.U. (1977a) – Source and biofacies of Late Quaternary sediments in relation to sea level on the shelf off Mauritania, West Africa. ‘Meteor’ Forschung Ergebnisse, C, 26, 1-43.

Einsele G., Herm D., Schwartz H.U. (1974) – Holocene eustatic( ?) sea-level fluctuation at the coast of Mauritania. ‘Meteor’ Forschung Ergebnisse, C, 18, 43-62.

Einsele G., Herm D., Schwartz H.U. (1977b) – Variation du niveau de la mer sur la plateforme continentale et la côte mauritanienne vers la fin de la glaciation du Würm et à l’Holocène. Bulletin de liaison de l’Association sénégalaise pour l’Étude du Quaternaire africain, 51, 35-48.

Elouard P. (1975) – Formations sédimentaires de Mauritanie atlantique. Monographies géologiques régionales. Notice explicative de la carte géologique au 1/1 000 000 de la Mauritanie, BRGM, Paris, 171-254.

Faure H., Elouard P. (1967) – Schéma des variations du niveau de l’océan Atlantique sur la côte de l’Ouest de l’Afrique depuis 4000 ans. Comptes Rendus Académie des Sciences, Paris, D, 265, 784-787.

Faure H., Hébrard L. (1977) – Variations des lignes de rivage au Sénégal et en Mauritanie au cours de l’Holocène. Studia geologica Polonica, LII, 143-157.

Faure H., Fontes J.-C., Hébrard L., Monteillet J., Pirazzoli P.A. (1980) – Geoidal changes and shore level tilt along Holocene estuaries: Senegal River area, West Africa. Science, 210, 421-423.

Giresse P., Barusseau J.-P., Gasse F., Hoang C-T. (1989) – Paléoenvironnements pléistocènes du littoral de Mauritanie d’après l’étude de la coupe du Cap Tafarit: proposition de suppression de la notion de Tafaritien, « étage marin ». Comptes Rendus Académie des Sciences, Paris, 309, II, 1377-1382.

Hébrard L. (1973) – Contribution à l’étude géologique du Quaternaire du littoral mauritanien entre Nouakchott et Nouadhibou. (18°-21° lat. N). Thèse de l’université Claude Bernard (Lyon 1), 2 t., 549 p.

Hébrard L. (1978) – Contribution à l’étude géologique du Quaternaire du littoral mauritanien entre Nouakchott et Nouadhibou. (18°–21° lat. N); contribution à l’étude des désertifications au Sahara. Documents du Laboratoire de Géologie de la Faculté des Sciences de Lyon, 71, 210 p.

Kocurek G., Deynoux M., Blackey R.C., Havholm K. (1991) – Amalgamated accumulations resulting from climatic and eustatic changes, Akchar erg, Mauritania. Sedimentology, 38, 751-772.

Koopmann B.J., Lees A., Piessens P. and Sarnthein M. (1979) – Skeletal carbonate sands and wind-derived silty marls off the Saharan coast: Baie du Lévrier, Arguin Platform, Mauritania. ‘Meteor’ Forschung Ergebnisse, C, 30, 15-57.

Mahé E. (1985) – Contribution à l’étude scientifique de la région du Banc d’Arguin (Littoral mauritanien: 21°2–19°20 lat. N). Thèse de Sciences, Université de Montpellier, t. 1, 576 p.

Medus J. (1987) – West African Holocene stratigraphy, transgressions and climatic changes. Proceedings in Oceanography, 18, 167-175.

Michel P. (1977) – Recherches sur le Quaternaire en Afrique occidentale. Bulletin de liaison de l’Association sénégalaise pour l’Étude du Quaternaire africain, 1, 50, 143-153.

Monteillet J. (1986) – Évolution quaternaire d’un écosystème fluvio-marin tropical de marge passive: environnements sédimentaires et paléoécologie du delta et de la basse vallée du fleuve Sénégal depuis environ 100 000 ans. Thèse de l’université de Perpignan, 264 p.

Monteillet J., Faure H., Pirazzoli P.A., Ravisé A. (1981) – L’invasion saline du Ferlo (Sénégal) à l’Holocène supérieur (1900 B.P.). Palaeoecology of Africa, 13, 205-215.

Ould Ahmed Benan C.A. (1991) – Processus sédimentologiques en milieu désertique: exemple de l’erg Akchar en Mauritanie occidentale. Mémoire de maîtrise, Université Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg, 35 p.

Pirazzoli P.A, Stiros S.C., Arnold J. Laborel J., Laborel-Deguen F., Papageorgiou S. (1994) –  Episodic uplift deduced from the Holocene shoreline in the Perachora peninsula. Tectonophysics, 229, 201-209.

Pirazzoli P. A. (1998) – La relativité des niveaux de la mer. Mappemonde, I, 52, 4, 7-10.

Sarnthein M. (1978) – Sand deserts during glacial maximum and climatic optimum. Nature, 272, 5648, 43-46.

Sarnthein M., Walger R. (1974) – Der äolische Sandstrom aus der W-Sahara zur Atlantik küste. Geologisch Rundschau, 63, 3, 1065-1087.

Stein R., Sarnthein M. (1983) – Late Neogene events of atmospheric and oceanic circulation offshore West Africa: high resolution records from deep-sea sediments. Palaeoecology of Africa, 16, 63-76.

Vail P.R., Mitchum R.M.Jr, Todd R.G., Widmeri J.W., Thomson S., Sangree J.B., Bubb J.N., Hatelid W.G. (1977) – Seismic stratigraphy and global change of sea-level. American Association of Petroleum Geologists Memories, 26, 49-212.

Vernet R. (1998) – Le littoral du Sahara atlantique mauritanien au Néolithique. Sahara, 10, 21-30.

Vernet R., Ould Mohamed Naffé D. (2003) – Dictionnaire archéologique de la Mauritanie. CRIAA – LERHI, Université de Nouakchott, 164 p.

Vernet R., Tous P. (2004) – Les amas coquilliers de Mauritanie occidentale et leur contexte paléoenvironnemental (VIIe-IIe millénaires BP). Préhistoire et Anthropologie Méditerranéennes, 13, 1-15.

Vernet R., Galin A., Saliège J.-F., Tous P. (2004) – Chronologie isotopique de l’occupation humaine sur le rivage du maximum nouakchottien (Mauritanie atlantique). Al-Wasît, Revue de l’Institut Mauritanien de Recherche Scientifique, 8, 15-35.

Vernet R., Hervé-Gruhier C., Saliège J.F., Lamarche B., Cherif O. (2001) – Le peuplement de l’île Tidra (Banc d’Arguin, Mauritanie) à l’Holocène récent. Actes du 11e Congr. Panafricain de Préhistoire, Bamako, thème 6, 8 p.

Williams M.A.J. (1975) – Late Pleistocene tropical aridity synchronous in both hemispheres ? Nature, 253, 617-618.

Haut de page

Annexe

Version française abrégée

L’arrivée de la mer post-glaciaire à son niveau actuel a lieu entre 6 000 et 5 000 ans BP. Depuis cette date des changements considérables se sont produits et déterminent la régularisation du trait de côte par redistribution des disponibilités sédimentaires. Les facteurs qui sont impliqués dans cette redistribution sont les variations supposées du niveau de la mer, les pulsations lithosphériques locales ou régionales et le volume des apports sédimentaires puissamment remaniés par la dynamique littorale. L’article proposé a pour objet d’établir une hiérarchie de ces facteurs dans le contexte particulier d’un site de la côte ouest-africaine situé sur le littoral du banc d’Arguin. Le littoral y est jalonné de plages sableuses ou d’estrans sablo-vaseux encadrés de rares pointements rocheux formant des caps et témoins d’une formation quaternaire continentale plus ancienne que 308 000 ans, le Tafaritien (Hébrard, 1973, 1978; Elouard, 1975; Giresse et al., 1988, 1989). Le secteur étudié dans la région de Ras el Sass–Jerf el Oustani–Îmgoutene (fig. 1) a été le site d’une baie estuarienne où aboutissait à la mer l’oued ech Chibka, de nos jours complètement asséché.

L’hydrodynamique actuelle est caractérisée par une marée semi-diurne et microtidale et par des houles atténuées par la protection du Cap Blanc et par les faibles profondeurs du Banc. Elles entretiennent une composante « longshore » dominante dirigée vers le sud et véhiculent une dérive littorale sédimentaire alimentée par d’imposants édifices dunaires.

Dans l’ensemble de la région littorale du Banc d’Arguin, la présence d’amas coquilliers néolithiques a permis la récolte d’un abondant matériel archéologique constitué de tessons de poterie et de petits outils, ainsi que des restes d’Anadara senilis, principal mollusque exploité par les populations humaines qui fréquentaient les parages du Banc à cette période. La description de ces amas et de leur contenu archéologique a fait l’objet de nombreux travaux (Amblard et al., 1990; Descamps et Vernet, 2001; Vernet et Ould Mohamed Naffé, 2003). Les populations néolithiques étaient tenues de rester au voisinage immédiat des positions de la ligne de rivage du moment, mais d’autres localisations de rivages successifs sont fournies, dans la région de Jerf el Oustani–Ras el Sass par des alignements de lignes concentriques en deux ensembles (fig. 2), l’un qui vient s’appuyer sur la falaise nord de Jerf el Oustani, l’autre qui rejoint la falaise est de Ras el Sass. L’approche méthodologique prend donc en considération les données de l’analyse archéologique des sites étudiés (observation visuelle des restes superficiels; fouille complète de quatre d’entre eux; fig. 3) et les résultats sédimentologiques (étude des indicateurs de paléorivages; réalisation d’un profil topographique; examen de la composition faunistique des restes contenus dans les sédiments). Les éléments archéologiques peuvent être utilisés comme éléments de datation dans le contexte bien connu du Néolithique mauritanien, avec trois grands groupes de témoins identifiés (fig. 4); cette information est complétée par des datations au radiocarbone.

Les amas positionnés au GPS se disposent généralement le long de lignes qui sont rattachées au mode d’évolution paléomorphologique de la zone dans son contexte de baie estuarienne. Ils matérialisent avec une approximation satisfaisante le tracé des lignes de rivage successives aux différentes époques d’occupation. Compte tenu des attributions temporelles issues de l’étude archéologique, ils permettent d’établir une chronologie des épisodes de régularisation du rivage. En outre, les résultats des datations (tab. 1) confirment la validité de ces attributions tout en précisant certains détails de l’occupation humaine des bordures littorales.

Le site de Jerf Sgheïr montre ainsi l’occupation précoce (4 900 ans BP) d’un point relativement éloigné des reliefs tafaritiens de bordure occupés aux alentours de 5 000 ans BP. En contrebas du flanc oriental de Jerf Sgheïr, deux petits amas au sud et au nord montrent des débris archéologiques de la culture de Tintan et les dates, entre 4 500 et 4 000 ans BP, sont cohérentes avec la position chronologique de cette attribution. La fermeture de la baie par colmatage sédimentaire va s’affirmer jusque vers 3 200-3 300 ans BP. Une présence néolithique récente (fig. 5) est montrée par des amas de plus en plus vers le sud ou le sud-ouest de part et d’autre d’un axe reliant Jerf Sgheïr et Jerf el Oustani. La fin de la présence humaine, vers 2 700-2 600 ans BP, marquée par une alène de cuivre, témoigne de la poursuite du colmatage de la baie estuarienne, moins avancé cependant que ce que montre la géographie actuelle.

Les datations du matériel malacologique et de carbone issu du bois de chauffe servant à l’ouverture des coquilles, donnent des résultats très voisins, sans un quelconque effet-réservoir.

La disposition générale des reliefs tafaritiens dessine un paysage de baie ouverte dans laquelle un certain nombre d’îles ont dû jouer un rôle important dans la formation du remplissage sédimentaire. Les paléolignes de rivage sont des accumulations de berme formant un léger relief de quelque 20 à 30 cm de hauteur sur une vingtaine de mètres de largeur et présentant une dissymétrie marquée avec un front tourné vers l’est. Ces accumulations sableuses sont accompagnées de fossiles marins variés indiquant une origine littorale (mollusques, crabes, os de poissons et de tortues…) et dessinent un tombolo rejoignant l’ancienne île de Jerf el Oustani. D’autres paléorivages moins anciens, riches en débris végétaux appartiennent à un autre tombolo orienté vers Ras el Sass. Ces différentes lignes organisées en arcs concentriques sont insérées dans une plaine sableuse dont l’altitude générale est inférieure à un mètre au-dessus du niveau marin moyen (fig. 6). La faune associée aux sables de la plaine est caractéristique des plages et des fonds marins littoraux de faible profondeur et les datations exécutées sur ce matériel coquillier des bermes indiquent des âges inscrits entre 2 560 et 2 720 ans BP (tab. 2).

Les données obtenues et les observations réalisées permettent la reconstitution des différentes étapes de l’évolution morphodynamique de la baie estuarienne de Jerf el Oustani et de l’occupation humaine de ses rivages au Néolithique et au Chalcolithique, avant les épisodes ultimes d’abandon. Si l’on présume que les grandes lignes de l’océanographie régionale sont installées à cette époque, avec un régime de houles dominantes venant de l’ouest ou du nord-ouest, dans les conditions d’une baie estuarienne parsemée d’îles, et que la disponibilité sédimentaire est abondante, diverses conséquences inévitables s’ensuivent (fig. 7). D’une part, une dérive sédimentaire littorale dirigée vers l’est se développe sur les rivages nord de l’Îmgoutene; elle est complétée par la formation de flèches sédimentaires près des changements d’orientation des contreforts rocheux. D’autre part, les processus de réfraction et de diffraction liés au contournement qu’induisent les obstacles insulaires tendent à définir des zones d’ombre, favorables à la formation de tombolos.

Cette évolution a pu se faire en six étapes (fig. 8) après la phase d’occupation des rivages élevés de bordure de la baie, antérieure à 5 000 ans BP d’après les restes archéologiques que l’on y trouve, mais non datés par radiochronologie:

1°) Sous l’action de la dérive littorale WE, une flèche littorale s’élabore qui rapidement rejoint la proche île de Jerf Sgheïr (4 900 ans B.P); 2°) dans l’abri formé par la flèche à l’est, le comblement se fait, peut-être sous l’action des alluvions sableuses encore apportées par l’oued ech Chibka (entre 4 900 et 4 600 ans BP); 3°) une phase ultérieure non datée radiochronologiquement est attestée par des amas dans la période qui suit, marquée par la poursuite du colmatage sédimentaire de la baie orientale. Elle est datée par des Anadara consommées à 4 435 ans B.P.; 4°) jusque vers 3 200 ans BP, des atterrissements se déposent et contribuent à la formation du premier tombolo, sur Jerf el Oustani; 5°) prenant appui sur le cordon daté à 2 900 ans BP au sud et sur la bordure nord du tombolo de Jerf el Oustani, des dépôts progressifs se forment qui tendent à colmater de plus en plus la baie de part et d’autre du tombolo de Jerf el Oustani. Cette phase semble être rapide; au nord les bermes datées vers 2 700 ans BP marquent une progradation de plusieurs centaines de mètres en un petit nombre d’années. La même péjoration climatique qui conduit à leur départ est peut-être aussi à l’origine de l’apport sédimentaire abondant par des flux éoliens suractivés (Tafolien d’Hébrard, 1978); 6°) le dernier épisode conduit à l’état actuel du secteur; il n’est daté ni archéologiquement (les populations ont disparu de la zone) ni radiométriquement. Il est cependant attesté par les formes de plage observées en abondance (laisses de mer) qui marquent d’abord l’édification d’un second tombolo. Cet épisode n’est pas achevé puisque des différences considérables sont observées à l’échelle décennale entre l’état de la ligne de rivage établi par la mission AOF 1954 de l’IGN et celui qu’on observe sur les documents satellitaires des années 1990 (fig. 9).

Poids relatifs des facteurs eustatisme et forçage sédimentaire

La séquence de dépôts formés pendant le remplissage de la baie estuarienne représente un système dynamique dont l’évolution spatio-temporelle est réglée par un bilan entre trois facteurs allocycliques (Vail et al., 1977) : variation de la position du niveau de la mer, déformation isovolume du substrat solide et flux sédimentaires modifiant localement la forme du substrat par apports de matériel nouveau. Le premier de ces facteurs a une portée générale ; toute variation du niveau de la mer se manifeste à l’échelle de l’océan mondial. Le second implique des tendances lourdes, inscrites en général dans un passé ancien, qu’il s’agisse de mouvements épirogéniques positifs ou négatifs ou de la coséismicité résultant de particularités tectoniques connues (Pirazzoli et al., 1994). Le troisième facteur dépend de la variabilité inscrite dans les couplages climat-hydrologie d’une part et climat-apports éoliens d’autre part. Dans la région de Jerf el Oustani, le problème se limite, en fait, à établir la part entre le poids relatif de deux facteurs seulement : eustatisme et forçage sédimentaire. En effet, le secteur appartient à la marge passive ouest-africaine, sauf rares occurrences signalées dans la littérature et qui n’affectent pas le secteur considéré ici (Einsele et al., 1974, 1977b ; Faure et al., 1980 ; Monteillet, 1986 ; Amblard et al., 1990).

On observe en premier lieu que, pendant toute la période étudiée, la disponibilité sédimentaire a été considérable. La production des sables se produit pendant toute la phase glaciaire (« Ogolien »), correspondant à des périodes d’aridité (Sarnthein et Walger, 1974 ; Williams, 1975 ; Beaudet et al., 1976 ; Michel, 1977 ; Sarnthein, 1978 ; Stein et Sarnthein, 1983). La redistribution de ce matériel, en second lieu, prend place lors de la transgression post-glaciaire et forme des cordons littoraux successifs. Une troisième modalité, sans doute la plus importante car elle est contemporaine de l’ensemble des phases de dépôt, aboutit au colmatage de la baie estuarienne. Elle résulte d’alternances de phases humides et arides au cours desquelles la couverture sableuse antérieure est remaniée. Ces phénomènes climatiques aboutissent à la superposition de systèmes dunaires séparés par des surfaces complexes d’érosion ou des paraconformités voire des surfaces de non-dépôt qui correspondent à des phases d’humidité (Deynoux et Proust, 1991 ; Kocurek et al., 1991 ; Ould Ahmed Benan, 1991). Au cours des phases arides, des dunes sont remobilisées sur le vaste système des ergs ogoliens, notamment au cours de l’épisode du Tafolien (Hébrard, 1973, 1978). À partir du moment où le niveau de la mer est arrivé près de son niveau actuel, l’action permanente de la houle aboutit nécessairement à une évolution morphodynamique prévisible qui est celle dont on a observé les traces.

La question se pose alors de l’éventualité de variations positives et/ou négatives du niveau de la mer pendant tout l’intervalle de la construction du remplissage sédimentaire de la baie estuarienne. Dans la région, de telles variations ont été fréquemment mises en avant pour expliquer la disposition des dépôts (Faure et Elouard, 1967 ; Einsele et al., 1974, 1977b ; Monteillet et al., 1981 ; Barusseau et al., 1989 ; Deynoux et al., 1991 ; Vernet et Tous, 2004). Cette opinion est contestable car : 1) l’altitude de tous les dépôts identifiés (plages ou bermes de plage) est conciliable avec le marnage actuel et les surcotes de tempêtes et 2) on n’observe aucune figure d’érosion qui aurait dû accompagner des mouvements régressifs parfois évoqués. L’ordre dans lequel se succèdent les dépôts au cours du colmatage est régulier ; les dépôts sont d’autant plus récents qu’ils se rapprochent de la mer, sans aucun bouleversement de cet ordre. Le recours à de nombreuses datations permettrait sans doute de définir avec précision les variations de vitesse du remblaiement. Il semble qu’il ait été particulièrement rapide après 3 000 ans BP. Cette rapidité pourrait être à l’origine de la bonne préservation des bermes situées à l’ouest du tombolo de Jerf el Oustani.

Haut de page

Table des illustrations

Titre Fig. 1 – Location map of the study area Fig. 1 – Situation de la région étudiée
Légende A: R.I Mauritania in West Africa; B: Banc d'Arguin area in NW Mauritania; C: Estuarine bay of Oued ech Chibka; D: Study areaA: R.I. de Mauritanie en Afrique de l’Ouest; B: le secteur du banc d’Arguin en R.I.M.; C: la baie estuarienne de l’Oued ech Chibka; D: secteur étudié.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/634/img-1.png
Fichier image/png, 64k
Titre Fig. 2 – The two sets of nested berms (IGN–AOF 100, 1954)Fig. 2 – Les deux ensembles de bermes emboîtées (d’après photo IGN–AOF 100, 1954).
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/634/img-2.png
Fichier image/png, 29k
Titre Fig. 3 – Location of the investigated and excavated shell-middens.Fig. 3 – Position des amas coquilliers identifiés et fouillés
Légende (Tafaritian outcrops denoted in grey) (affleurements tafaritiens en gris).
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/634/img-3.png
Fichier image/png, 51k
Titre Fig. 4 – Chronological data based on pottery shard typology.Fig. 4 – Chronologie archéologique fondée sur la typologie des tessons.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/634/img-4.png
Fichier image/png, 73k
Titre Table 1 – Shell midden radiocarbon dates.Tableau 1 – Datations au 14C d’éléments des amas coquilliers.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/634/img-5.png
Fichier image/png, 4,7k
Titre Fig. 5 – Location of shell-midden alignments on sand spit or beach ridges, showing human occupation of successive palaeoshorelines. Fig. 5 – Situation des alignements d'amas coquilliers sur les flèches et cordons littoraux, montrant les occupations successives des paléorivages.
Légende 1: No 14C ages; ages older than 5000 years B.P. according to archaeology; 2: Jerf Sgheïr shell midden, 4900 years B.P.; 3: Tintan group, 4600-4000 years B.P.; 4: Last Neolithic groups, 3300 years B.P.; 5: Copper Age groups, 2700-2600 years B.P.; 6: unknown ages, no shards, no dates.1: absences de dates 14C; plus ancien que 5 000 ans BP d'après l'archéologie; 2: amas coquillier de Jerf Sgheïr, 4 900 ans BP; 3: groupe « Tintan », 4 600-4 000 ans BP; 4: derniers groupes du Néolithique, 3 300 ans BP; 5: groupes de l'âge du cuivre, 2 700-2 600 ans BP; 6: âges inconnus, ni tessons, ni datations.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/634/img-6.png
Fichier image/png, 52k
Titre Fig. 6 – Cross-shore topographic profile showing the entire sand flat within the current tidal range. Fig. 6 – Profil topographique transversal totalement inscrit dans le marnage actuel.
Légende HTSL/LTSL: high-tide and low-tide sea level.HTSL/LTSL: niveaux de haute mer et de basse mer, respectivement.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/634/img-7.png
Fichier image/png, 17k
Titre Table 2 – Radiocarbon dating of the palaeo-berms.Tableau 2 – Datations au 14C de coquilles des paléobermes.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/634/img-8.png
Fichier image/png, 2,2k
Titre Fig. 7 – Oblique view of proposed palaeo-hydro/morphodynamic processes in the former Oued ech Chibka bay. Fig. 7 – Vue oblique montrant le schéma proposé des processus hydro- et morphodynamiques en action dans l’ancienne baie estuarienne de l’Oued ech Chibka.
Légende 1: dominant wave regime; 2: northern longshore drift active during the beginning of the period; 3 and 4: refracted wave fronts and associated orthogonals; 5 a and b: successive tombolos formed in the wave shadow of the islands; 6: Oued ech Chibka sediment input.1: houles dominantes; 2: action de la dérive littorale en début de période; 3 et 4: réfraction des fronts de houles et orthogonales associées; 5 a et b: tombolos successifs formés à l’abri des îles; 6: direction des apports de l’Oued ech Chibka)
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/634/img-9.png
Fichier image/png, 64k
Titre Fig. 8 – Successive stages in the construction of the sand flat. Fig. 8 – Étapes successives de la formation du sand flat.
Légende 1: development of the spit joining Jerf Sgheïr; 2 and 3: beginning of the Oued ech Chibka infilling; 4: formation of the Jerf el Oustani tombolo; 5: rapid filling of the northern and southern bays either side of Jerf el Oustani tombolo; 6: formation of the Ras el Sass tombolo and sand flat completion.1: développement de la flèche sédimentaire rejoignant Jerf Sgheïr; 2 et 3: début du colmatage; 4: formation du tombolo de Jerf el Oustani; 5: régularisation rapide des baies au nord et au sud; 6: formation du tombolo de Ras el Sass et régularisation du trait de côte.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/634/img-10.png
Fichier image/png, 42k
Titre Fig. 9 – Recent stages of the shaping of the shoreline. 1954: IGN photograph; 1990s: satellite image.Fig. 9 – Étapes récentes de la régularisation du trait de côte. 1954: photo IGN; années 1990: image satellitaire.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/634/img-11.png
Fichier image/png, 28k
Haut de page

Pour citer cet article

Référence électronique

Jean-Paul Barusseau, Robert Vernet, Jean-François Saliège et Cyr Descamps, « Late Holocene sedimentary forcing and human settlements in the Jerf el Oustani - Ras el Sass region (Banc d’Arguin, Mauritania) », Géomorphologie : relief, processus, environnement [En ligne], vol. 13 - n° 1 | 2007, mis en ligne le 01 avril 2009, consulté le 22 mai 2017. URL : http://geomorphologie.revues.org/634 ; DOI : 10.4000/geomorphologie.634

Haut de page

Droits d’auteur

© Groupe français de géomorphologie

Haut de page
  • Logo CNRS - Institut des sciences humaines et sociales
  • Logo Groupe français de géomorphologie
  • Revues.org