Navigation – Plan du site

Geoheritage assessment based on large-scale geomorphological mapping: contributes from a Portuguese limestone massif example

L’évaluation du géopatrimoine à partir des cartes géomorphologiques à grande échelle : l’exemple d’un massif calcaire portugais
Maria Luísa Rodrigues et André Fonseca
p. 189-198

Résumés

L’importance de l’échelle que l’on utilise au cours des différentes étapes de la cartographie géomorphologique est un thème très discuté au sein de la communauté scientifique et fait l’objet de discussions. Néanmoins, de pair avec l’importance de l’identification, de l’évaluation, de la promotion et de la préservation des géomorphosites, le recours à différentes échelles n’est pas tout à fait clairement défini, surtout à cause des différences d’échelle spatiale des phénomènes géomorphologiques étudiés. Quand on parle d’échelle en ce qui concerne l’identification et l’inventaire du patrimoine géomorphologique, on doit prendre en considération le processus d’évaluation. À partir des méthodes existantes, on souligne quatre questions principales, liées aux problèmes d’échelle : Qu’est-ce que l’on gagne quand on utilise une cartographie géomorphologique à grande échelle ? Est-il plausible d’évaluer en même temps micro et macro formes ? Ces formes doivent-elles être analysées séparément en utilisant des méthodes différentes ? Quels paramètres doivent être considérés ? Cet article se propose de discuter le processus d’évaluation du patrimoine géomorphologique et les problèmes qui résultent de son application à des relevés à grande échelle, en soulignant son lien avec la préservation des sites géomorphologiques et en prenant comme exemple la Fórnia, localisée dans le Massif Calcaire de l’Estremadura.

Haut de page

Notes de la rédaction

Article soumis le 18 octobre 2009, accepté le 17 mai 2010

Texte intégral

We acknowledge the three anonymous reviewers whose useful comments and suggestions contribute to a real improvement of the original text. We are grateful to Christian Giusti who followed this work since its presentation in the Geomorphosites 2009 till its final version, helping with the correction of the French text. A special word to the support of Gilles Arnaud-Fassetta who exceeded its Editor-in-Chief work and gave us a continuous encouragement and help in all phases of the paper finalisation.

Introduction

1Geomorphologic landscapes are a part of the natural scientific resources and are of great importance either for the reconstruction of Earth’s evolution or for the history of man’s impact on the landscape. When mapping geoheritage, it is of uppermost importance to identify, attribute a spatial location, evaluate, preserve and promote geomorphosites (Panizza, 2001). So, the way to work all this information is quite challenging, as it involves the communication of a message from a scientific source to the territorial management and planning authorities. The assessment and evaluation of geomorphosites is quite an important issue concerning all the researchers working on this field of investigation. Qualitative and quantitative criteria have been developed over the last decade to evaluate geomorphosites (e.g., Panizza, 2001 ; Coratza and Giusti, 2005 ; Reynard, 2007 ; Pereira et al., 2007). However, the quantitative methods, as they try to reduce evaluation subjectivity, tend to include many parameters and variables. This option it is not reliable because normally uses those parameters more than once or it overlaps them partially. Moreover, as A. Carton et al. (2005) have firstly pointed out, the problems connected to scale during geoheritage survey and evaluation has not yet been taken into proper account. Normally it includes the same evaluation procedure sites with different spatial scales (e.g., Pereira et al., 2007). Based on previous methods used in geomorphosite assessment and evaluation, we have outlined four major questions connected to the scale problematic : i) What do we get by applying large scale geomorphological mapping ? ii) Will it be reasonable to evaluate simultaneously micro and macro forms ? iii) Should they be assessed separately by using different methods ? iv) Which parameters should be considered ? In this paper we will discuss the importance of large scale surveys within the process of evaluation, its connection to site preservation ; as well, we will try to answer some of the questions above by applying one methodology on a particular site at the Estremadura Limestone Massif (ELM), Portugal.

Geological and geomorphological framework

2The ELM is the most important karst relief in Portugal. It is allocated only 20 km from the Atlantic Ocean and 100 km to the north of Lisbon. It has moderate altitudes (a maximum of 680 m) standing out on the contact between the western Meso-Cenozoic sedimentary basin and the Ceno-Anthropozoic Tagus sedimentary basin. This contact is marked by an overthrust where the Jurassic limestone block overlaps the Tagus terrigenous land. The ELM is formed by four high units (fig. 1) : two reliefs supported by anticline structures (Candeeiros and Aire mountains) and two erosive plateaus tectonically uplifted (St. António and S. Mamede). These four high units are separated by three tectonic depressions : the dissymmetric grabens of Minde and Alvados, with a SE-NW orientation, and the Mendiga graben that, at its northern side, joins the Porto de Mós depression (see also fig. 2). The highest points of the ELM are situated in the anticline mountains of Serra de Candeeiros, an elongated relief that establishes the western margin of the Massif for 30 km long (fig. 2) and reaches 615 m in altitude, and of Serra de Aire in the eastern side, near the contact with the Tagus basin, where it’s located the maximum altitude of the ELM (680 m).

Fig. 1 – Location sketch of the Estremadura Limestone Massif.
Fig. 1 – Carte de localisation du Massif Calcaire de l’Estremadura.

Fig. 1 – Location sketch of the Estremadura Limestone Massif. Fig. 1 – Carte de localisation du Massif Calcaire de l’Estremadura.

A : Alvados ; M : Minde ; Md : Mendiga.
A : Alvados ; M : Minde ; Md : Mendiga.

Fig. 2 – Geomorphologic map of the Estremadura Limestone Massif (after Ferreira et al., 1988).
Fig. 2 – Carte geomorphologique du Massif Calcaire de l’Estremadura (d’après Ferreira et al., 1988).

Fig. 2 – Geomorphologic map of the Estremadura Limestone Massif (after Ferreira et al., 1988). Fig. 2 – Carte geomorphologique du Massif Calcaire de l’Estremadura (d’après Ferreira et al., 1988).

1 : fault scarp and anticline slope ; 2 : overthrust ; 3 : erosion area ; 4 : rocky edge slope ; 5 : monocline relief ; 6 : erosion area (Tagus Basin) ; 7 : hogback ; 8 : Richter slope ; 9 : horizontal surface ; 10 : slope top and bottom ; 11 : diapiric area ; 12 : fault ; 13 : fracture ; 14 : flexure ; 15 : topographic dip ; 16 : Ourém basin limit ; 17 : S. Mamede sandstones ; 18 : St. António and S. Mamede plateaus higher levels ; 19 : Fátima platform ; 20 : Mendiga depression and Murteira-Carvalheiro level ; 21 : Polje of Minde and Alvados depression ; 22 : ancient littoral platform ; 23 : Tagus substructural level ; 24 : well-defined karst depression ; 25 : not well-defined karst depression ; 26 : inlaid karst depression ; 27 : river and gorge ; 28 : gully ; 29 : shallow, underground river and karst outlet ; 30 : approximate height ; 31 : altitude (in m).
1 : escarpement de faille et flanc anticlinal ; 2 : chevauchement ; 3 : surface d’érosion ; 4 : crête rocheuse ; 5 : relief en structure monoclinale ; 6 : surface d’érosion (Bassin du Tage) ; 7 : crêt monoclinal ; 8 : versant de Richter ; 9 : surface horizontale ; 10 : sommet et base du versant ; 11 : diapir ; 12 : faille ; 13 : fracture ; 14 : flexure ; 15 : déclivité du terrain ; 16 : limite du bassin d’Ourém ; 17 : grès de S. Mamede ; 18 : niveaux d’érosion supérieurs des plateaux de St. António et de S. Mamede ; 19 : plateforme de Fátima ; 20 : dépression de Mendiga et niveau de Murteira-Carvalheiro ; 21 : poljé de Minde et dépression d’Alvados ; 22 : plateforme littorale ancienne ; 23 : niveau substructural du Tage ; 24 : dépression karstique bien définie ; 25 : dépression karstique mal définie ; 26 : dépression karstique incrustée ; 27 : cours d’eau et gorge ; 28 : ravin ; 29 : perte, rivière souterraine et résurgence ; 30 : altitude estimée ; 31 : altitude (en m).

3Regarding to lithology, the presence of Infralias to lower Cretaceous formations is to be noted. Drillings confirmed the existence of sandy marls and sandstones lying under important clay-evaporitic series on the basis of the Jurassic. This unit is overlaid by a thick Jurassic set of layers of predominantly limestone nature, which played an important role in the morphostructural individualisation of the Massif. Although the clays only outcrop in a narrow diapiric depression, the diapirism phenomenon is also associated with deep tectonic structures. However, it is the thick Dogger limestone complex which accounts for the geomorphologic individuality of the ELM. Besides the lithology, the height differences between the limestone blocks are to a great extent connected to major tectonic lineaments, coincident with the internal and external boundaries of the massif (fig. 2). The structural deformations that mark the essential relief features are folds, faults or mixed tectonic lineaments as fault-bend thrust. The first features include important anticline deformations, normally associated with faulting (normal faults in the western border and overthrusts at the southern and eastern boundaries). This overthrust is a major tectonic lineament, particularly active since the middle Miocene, which marks the contact between the two morphostructural units : the occidental border inactive basin and the Tagus active basin. From an initial meridian compressive phase, in the middle Miocene, the major compressive direction rotates to NW-SE in the late Miocene. The uplift is still active and gives place to a sinistral transpressive strike-slip. Besides the peripheral tectonic lineaments, there are two other tectonic features corresponding to the reactivation of late-Hercynian faults : the diapiric ones (with a submeridian orientation) and the NW-SE faults which have risen the impressive fault scarps of Costas of Minde and Alvados, as well as, generated the corresponding asymmetric grabens (fig. 2). The NW-SE faults cut transversely the ELM giving origin to vertical separations of more than 250 m. They are due to an extensional phase followed by several compressive submeridian phases which originate a right hand transpressive strike-slip regime.

4Another distinctive mark of the ELM is linked with the absence of permanent subaerial rivers within the limestone block. Apart from the peripheral sectors, where exsurgences of unequal importance contributes to a perennial surface drainage, and a few local springs within the compartment associated to temporary streams, no autochthonous or exotic river crosses the surface of the Massif. This fact is a direct result of the nature and fracture density of the limestone rock, transforming it into a large ground water reservoir with abundant fossil and active galleries and conduits. The structural and hydrological aspects, allied to the Middle Jurassic limestone’s high solubility, are responsible for a great variety of both surface and underground karstic forms. Among the superficial karst landforms there are major ones like the polje of Minde (with periodical flooding), uvalas, dolines, small karst depressions, old fluvio-karst forms and a great variety of karren features. Within the existing karst landforms, Fórnia is the most spectacular amphitheatre valley head (reculée in French), in Portugal. It’s an incision in the NE border of the St. António Plateau, which corresponds to a major fault scarp in relation to the graben of Alvados (Costa of Alvados) with more than 200 m of vertical uplift (fig. 2).

5The major part of the ELM is covered by a protection status, constituting the Natural Park of Aire and Candeeiros Mountains (PNSAC) with the task of the karst protection between its main goals. To discuss the application of geoheritage evaluation on the Portuguese limestone massifs and particularly in the Fórnia, it is important to do a brief reference to the Quaternary morphoclimatic environments related to slope evolution processes. Continental Portugal occupied a quite marginal position concerning to the true glacial and periglacial domains. The unique small mountain glaciers were located at the Central Massif (Sierra of Estrela) and at the Northwestern Mountains of Gerês. Related to this situation, the relict cryonival deposits and landforms, in Portugal, are found above 39ºN. The more frequent phenomena are screes, stratified slope deposits and head deposits. Outside those mountainous areas, cryonival manifestations were recognised in lower lands and near the Atlantic coast. The larger known set of relict cryonival deposits is located at the Estremadura Limestone Massif (ELM), as it was described by M.L. Rodrigues (1988, 1991, 1995, 1998, 2004, 2005).

6ELM stratified slope deposits were classified according to field criteria into three major groups : i) an openwork or clast-supported stratified slope deposits with different degrees of consolidation due to calcium carbonate cement, including different episodes named C1, C2 and C3 ; ii) a solifluction deposits, generally matrix-rich, including different episodes named S1, S2 and S3 ; iii) the deposits included in well developed talus screes with vertical and longitudinal classification of clasts by size, including the deposits named E. Within the first group, the second episode (C2) has a larger spatial representation and better preserved sedimentary characteristics. The same occurs with the second episode of the second group (S2 ; see Rodrigues, 1998, 2004, 2005).

The Fórnia case study

7The Fórnia (fig. 2) is a major karst landform, named as an amphitheatre head valley or a reculée and it has the perfect shape of an inverted cone, due to fluvio-karstic processes and assisted by an intense tectonic fragmentation. However, the genesis of its perfect regularised rectilinear slopes is due to frost action and snow melting conditions, which it was recorded during the latest quaternary cold events (fig. 3). The geomorphologic heritage preserved at Fórnia is an important testimony of the complex geomorphologic evolution of the European sectors marginal to the glaciated areas.

8The geomorphological heritage present at Fórnia comprises particular karst features (perennial and seasonal exsurgences, caves, waterfalls and swallow-holes). It has inherited deposits and one major ancient rockfall, possibly triggered by seismic activity.

Fig. 3 – General perspective of Fórnia (Estremadura Limestone Massif, Portugal).
Fig. 3 – Vue d’ensemble de la Fórnia (Massif Calcaire de l’Estremadura, Portugal).

Fig. 3 – General perspective of Fórnia (Estremadura Limestone Massif, Portugal).Fig. 3 – Vue d’ensemble de la Fórnia (Massif Calcaire de l’Estremadura, Portugal).

9Concerning to the inherited deposits from colder quaternary periods briefly mentioned before, it is possible to find inside Fórnia the remains of deposits C1, C2, C3 (fig. 4), S2 and E (some of these talus screes can be seen in fig. 3). This means that almost the complete sequence of relict cryonival deposits of the ELM is preserved in the Fórnia (only S1 and S3 are missing) and that there is no other place in the ELM with such concentration of evidences. Moreover, this is the only place in which it’s possible to find C1 deposit and that shows the most representative examples of the C3 deposit. The presence of this unique combination makes these features the crown jewel of the geomorphological heritage present at Fórnia, besides other karst features such as caves, exsurgences or waterfalls.

10To preserve the natural heritage, one should be also highlighted the richness of both fauna and flora (birds of prey, cave fauna, Mediterranean aromatic flora), which give, in connection to the existing geoheritage, an unquestionable scientific value, as well as, a strong geotouristic interest. Indeed, Fórnia is a clear-cut geomorphologic and landscape heritage that must be preserved and classified as a geomorphosite within the Natural Park of Aire and Candeeiros Mountains (PNSAC) as stood up by M.L. Rodrigues (1989, 1996) and even at a national and international level (Rodrigues, 2008). The detailed geomorphologic map (fig. 5) shows the diversity of forms and processes present at the Fórnia and its surrounding area, namely those related to cryonival forms and deposits, karst forms and hydrology and to slope and erosion processes.

Fig. 4 – Detailed photograph of the C3 deposit (Fórnia, Estremadura Limestone Massif).
Fig. 4 – Photographie détaillée du dépôt C3 (Fórnia, Massif Calcaire de l’Estremadura).

Fig. 4 – Detailed photograph of the C3 deposit (Fórnia, Estremadura Limestone Massif).Fig. 4 – Photographie détaillée du dépôt C3 (Fórnia, Massif Calcaire de l’Estremadura).

Fig. 5 – Detailed geomorphological map of Fórnia (after Rodrigues, 1998).
Fig. 5 – Carte géomorphologique détaillée de la Fórnia (d’après Rodrigues, 1998).

Fig. 5 – Detailed geomorphological map of Fórnia (after Rodrigues, 1998). Fig. 5 – Carte géomorphologique détaillée de la Fórnia (d’après Rodrigues, 1998).

1 : contour line (in m) ; 2 : local altitude (in m) ; 3 : limit of geological formation or deposit ; 4 : compact limestones ; 5 : marly limestones ; 6 : marls ; 7 : clays ; 8 : structural ridge > 10 m ; 9 : structural ridge < 10 m ; 10 : structural ridge with shelter ; 11 : karst depression ; 12 : karsified limestone partially covered with terra rossa ; 13 : karsified limestone ; 14 : exhumed karren ; 15 : consolidated cryoclastic deposit ; 16 : ridge on cryoclastic deposit ; 17 : solifluction deposit ; 18 : talus scree ; 19 : scree corridor in V ; 20 : scree corridor in U ; 21 : area affected by rock fall with defined scar ; 22 : area affected by rock fall without scar ; 23 : individual rock fall ; 24 : isolated block fall ; 25 : bloch slide ; 26 : preserved rock fall ; 27 : rock fall limit ; 28 : collapsed ridge ; 29 : collapsed cryoclastic deposit ; 30 : reverse slope ; 31 : gully ; 32 : gully > 2 m ; 33 : gully head ; 34 : rill ; 35 : overland flow ; 36 : top and slope base ; 37 : slope (< 15º) ; 38 : slope (15º-25º) ; 39 : slope (> 25º) ; 40 : local base ; 41 : pass ; 42 : glacis ; 43 : erosional ridge ; 44 : direction of slope ; 45 : talus cone ; 46 : colluvial > 30 cm ; 47 : colluvial < 30 cm ; 48 : V shaped valley ; 49 : U shaped valley ; 50 : suspended valley ; 51 : knick ; 52 : alluvial deposits ; 53 : river embankment ; 54 : perennial stream ; 55 : temporary stream ; 56 : perennial exsurgence ; 57 : temporary exsurgence ; 58 : exsurgence from cave ; 59 : insurgence ; 60 : groupe of houses ; 61 : isolated house ; 62 : road.
1 : courbe de niveau (en m) ; 2 : altitude local (en m) ; 3 : limite de formation géologique ou de dépôt ; 4 : calcaires compacts ; 5 : calcaires marneux ; 6 : marnes ; 7 : argiles ; 8 : corniche structurale > 10 m ; 9 : corniche structurale < 10 m ; 10 : corniche structurale avec abri sous-roche ; 11 : dépression karstique ; 12 : calcaire karstifié partiellement couvert de terra rossa ; 13 : calcaire karstifié ; 14 : lapiás exhumés ; 15 : dépôt de gélifracts consolidé ; 16 : corniche dans un dépôt de gélifracts ; 17 : dépôt de coulée de solifluxion ; 18 : talus de gravité ; 19 : couloir de talus en V ; 20 : couloir de talus en U ; 21 : surface affectée par un éboulement rocheux avec cicatrice d’arrachement nette ; 22 : surface affectée par un éboulement rocheux sans cicatrice d’arrachement visible ; 23 : éboulement isolé ; 24 : chute de bloc isolé ; 25 : bloc glissé ; 26 : éboulement préservé ; 27 : limite d’éboulement ; 28 : chute de corniche ; 29 : chute de dépôt cryoclastique ; 30 : contre-pente ; 31 : ravine ; 32 : ravine > 2 m ; 33 : partie amont de ravine ; 34 : rigole ; 35 : écoulement diffus ; 36 : haut et base du versant ; 37 : pente (< 15º) ; 38 : pente (15º-25º) ; 39 : pente > 25º ; 40 : niveau de base local ; 41 : col ; 42 : glacis ; 43 : crête d’érosion ; 44 : direction de la pente ; 45 : cône d’éboulis ; 46 : colluvium > 30 cm ; 47 : colluvium < 30 cm ; 48 : vallée en V ; 49 : vallée en U ; 50 : vallée suspendue ; 51 : point de résistance ; 52 : dépôt alluvial ; 53 : levée de berge ; 54 : cours d’eau permanent ; 55 : cours d’eau temporaire ; 56 : exurgence permanente ; 57 : exurgence temporaire ; 58 : exurgence de grotte ; 59 : perte ; 60 : habitat groupé ; 61 : habitat isolé ; 62 : route.

Geoheritage evaluation

11Although a lot of discussion has been made concerning scale and symbology on the geomorphological maps (see, for instance, Klimaszewski, 1968 ; Demek, 1972 ; Panizza, 1972), these issues have not been yet properly discussed on the assessment and evaluation of geomorphosites. When performing geomorphosite inventory at a national or regional level (national parks, regional areas, regional parks, geoparks, natural parks or protected landscapes, mountainous areas, coastal areas, etc.) the different scales are applied : medium scale geomorphologic maps are used for national inventories (scales from 1 :50,000 or 1 :100,000 till 1 :500,000), and large scale geomorphologic maps for regional assessments of geomorphosites (scales from 1 :10,000 till 1 :25,000 or 1 :50,000). The choice of scale is therefore connected to the spatial scale of the existing landforms (micro to macroforms), to the degree of detail to which the geomorphological survey is performed and to management, planning and preservation of geomorphosites.

12Considering to the present case study, due to the nature and spatial scale of the Quaternary deposits present at Fórnia, a detailed geomorphological mapping is required (scales from 1 :2,000 till 1 :10,000 ; Rodrigues, 1998, 2008). The deposits occupy different topographic positions and have different degrees of consolidation. So, the combination of these two factors is strongly connected to natural and anthropogenic erosion processes. Different levels of accessibility (related to different topographic positions) and different degrees of resistance (related to distinct consolidation degrees) have great implications on the deposits vulnerability to natural or human agents. For instance the deposit C1 is perched 30 m above the ancient alluvial plain (low accessibility) and is strongly cemented so its vulnerability is low. On the other hand, the deposit C3 reaches the bottom of the slope (high accessibility) and its cementation is very week, having for that reason quite high vulnerability.

13Although some methodologies include parameters that establish the connection to the vulnerability assessment (Pereira et al., 2007, among others), we believe that, when working at larger scales, in particular, in this case, other factors should be taken into account, in order to help management and preservation of the site. So, until now, there is not enough experience on using detailed scales, in especial, when applying an evaluation criteria (namely the additional values), which it were created for geomorphosite analysis on a broader scale. To overtake this problem and assess the scientific value and vulnerability of the geomorphological heritage, we have decided to divide the evaluation process into two phases : i) Evaluation of all Quaternary deposits present at Fórnia based on a geomorphological survey on a 1 :2000 scale (Rodrigues, 1998 ; fig. 5 and fig. 6). By using a simplified approach, we will try to evaluate the scientific and protection values which it enables to analyse and propose, separately, site preservation measures to the territorial management and planning authorities ; ii) Fórnia was considered as a geomorphosite (including landforms, deposits, hydrologic features, evolution processes, fauna and flora) and the evaluation was based on its scientific, additional, use and protection values. In both evaluation procedures, values have ranged from 0 to 1, in order to reduce statistical error resulting from over and under rated parameters.

Fig. 6 – Location of the relict cryonival deposits within Fórnia.
Fig. 6 – Localisation des dépôts hérités de périodes froides dans la Fórnia.

Fig. 6 – Location of the relict cryonival deposits within Fórnia. Fig. 6 – Localisation des dépôts hérités de périodes froides dans la Fórnia.

1 : scree deposit ; 2 : solifluction deposit ; 3 : cryoclastic deposit ; 4 : code.
1 : talus de gravité ; 2 : dépôt de coulée de solifluxion ; 3 : dépôts cryoclastiques ; 4 : code.

Quaternary deposits evaluation

14The Quaternary deposits (fig. 6) are formed by openwork or clast-supported cryoclastic deposits with different degrees of consolidation (C1, C2 and C3), solifluction deposits (S2) and talus screes (E). Based on three “recurrent” (Reynard, 2007) scientific criteria - rarity, representativeness and integrity (Grandgirard, 1999) - and the protection values proposed by P. Pereira et al. (2007) each one was assigned with a score ranging from 0 to 1. As we are dealing with a group of deposits that fit in to the same chronological boundary, and representing an important inheritance for the reconstruction of Fórnia evolution, we decided not to include the palaeogeographic value. In fact, and in this particular case, we prefer to use the term ‘paleoenvironmental value’ instead of ‘palaeogeographic value’ (Reynard, 2007), although we believe it is not yet the most adequate designation. In our point of view, ‘paleoenvironmental value’ intends to evaluate sites importance, regarding landform or deposit that contributes for the knowledge and reconstruction of recent earth evolution, present landscape and recent climate history. Normally, these evidences are related to quaternary forms, deposits and processes. Instead, the term ‘palaeogeographic’ has a broader sense, including for instance fossils, ancient erosion or discordant surfaces due to tectonic movements, etc., that belong to a geological heritage and not to a geomorphologic heritage.

15We have considered representativeness and rareness as two parameters that describe scientific value, and used integrity as a protection value, as it is useful to outline protection measures based on the present state of conservation of the deposit. P. Pereira et al. (2007) has presented the same theory, but ended up using it more than once, which in our point of view it is unnecessary and statistically incorrect. Tab. 1 shows the scores obtained for each relict deposit in respect to scientific and protection values. The final column shows the results for vulnerability which it is the sum of consolidation and accessibility (both varying from 0 to 0.5). The average vulnerability value obtained (0.4) will be used later on in the Fórnia geomorphosite evaluation, as it constitutes one of the main pillars of the protection values. We used six classes of accessibility which were established after crossing an accessibility map (roads, paths and other trails) with a slope angle map : 0.5 : very good (road) ; 0,4 : good (paths and other trails) ; 0.3 : fair (low slope angle) ; 0.2 : weak (moderate slope angle) ; 0.1 : bad (high slope angle) ; 0 : very bad (very high slope angle). Values lower than 0.4 are considered as off trail access. The deposits consolidation was classified in four classes : 0.5 : without consolidation ; 0.3 : weak consolidation ; 0.1 : medium consolidation ; 0 : high or very high consolidation. Although all sets of Quaternary deposits show relative importance in terms of geoheritage, four have higher scientific scores (tab. 1) : C1, C3 (detail aspect in fig. 4), E5 (the second group of screes from the right in fig. 3) and S2A.

16However, in terms of vulnerability, the obtained results depict a different situation. The C1 deposit has no protection problems, mainly due to its high consolidation and bad accessibility. Scree deposit E5 shows a medium score in respect to total vulnerability, but it has already suffered some basal erosion, not only due to river cutting but also due to human impact. Deposits C3 and S2A are the ones to have higher vulnerability values. The first, having low consolidation and fair accessibility, is affected by rappel and downhill activities which lead to the increase of erosion processes. The second one, revealing similar physical conditions, is located at a river meander and experiences strong natural erosion.

17The present analysis shows that considering the importance of the deposits, human activities should be reduced to a minimum through correct planning of trails, accesses and outdoor activities in order to minimise damage or total loss of these particular geomorphological evidences.

Tab. 1 – Evaluation of Fórnia relict cryonival deposits.
Tab. 1 – Évaluation des dépôts hérités de périodes froides de la Fórnia.

Deposits

Code

Scientific value

Protection values

Representativeness

Rareness

Integrity

Vulnerability

Consolidation

Accessibility

Total

Crioclastic 1

C1       

1

1

1

0

0.1

0.1

Crioclastic 2

C2R      

0.5

0.1

0.75

0.1

0

0.1

Crioclastic 2

C2B      

0.25

1

0

0.1

0.3

0.4

Crioclastic 3

C3       

1

1

0.75

0.3

0.3

0.6

Scree     

E1       

0.5

0.5

1

0.3

0.1

0.4

Scree     

E2       

0.5

0.5

1

0.3

0.1

0.4

Scree     

E3       

0.5

0.5

1

0.3

0.1

0.4

Scree     

E4       

0.5

0.5

1

0.3

0.1

0.4

Scree     

E5       

1

1

0.75

0.3

0.1

0.4

Scree     

E6       

0.5

0.5

1

0.3

0.1

0.4

Scree     

E7       

0.5

0.5

1

0.3

0.1

0.4

Scree     

E8       

0.5

0.5

1

0.3

0.1

0.4

Scree     

E9       

0.5

0.5

1

0.3

0.1

0.4

Scree     

E10      

0.5

0.5

1

0.3

0.1

0.4

Scree     

E11      

0.5

0.5

1

0.3

0.1

0.4

Scree     

E12      

0.5

0.5

1

0.3

0.1

0.4

Solifluction2

S2B      

0.5

0.75

0.5

0.5

0.3

0.8

Solifluction2

S2A      

1

0.75

0.25

0.5

0.2

0.7

Fórnia Geomorphosite evaluation

18As it was previously done, we tried to use simple parameters in order to avoid subjectivity. The evaluation was based on ten parameters, which it were later divided by four major values : i) scientific : rareness, representativeness and paleoenvironmental values ; ii) additional : ecological, aesthetic and cultural values ; iii) use : accessibility and visibility ; iv) protection : integrity and vulnerability. All parameters range from 0 to 1, meaning that the maximum obtained value for the geomorphosite is 10. The Fórnia geomorphosite sums a total of 8.75 points, depicting low cultural value (0.25) and medium vulnerability (0.4) due to possible loss of important inherited deposits. Nevertheless, we have not applied the same evaluation to different sites within the massif, based on the knowledge that we have gathered over the years, Fórnia has a high value in the ELM. Anyway, it is unique within the Portuguese context and it is an outstanding international geomorphosite (Rodrigues, 2008).

Conclusion

19Though, the relationship between scale of survey and mapping has already been discussed largely among geomorphologists, there is not enough reflection on its application to geoheritage assessment, evaluation and mapping.

20When working on broader scales the evaluation procedures are based on the sum of different values associated to a particular geomorphosite. These are normally accounted as landscapes, groups of landforms or deposits, but neglecting, during the assessment process, the individuality of each geomorphological element and its relation of scale. One of the important issues introduced in the present paper regards to the application of previous methodologies within the evaluation of large-scale geoheritage assessment. By separating the evaluation procedure according to the geomorphological elements scale (inherited deposits vs. Fórnia) and by introducing physical properties into the evaluation procedure (in this case the degree of consolidation of the deposits), we have got the possibility of analysing each element independently, reducing subjectivity and getting a better understanding of the management and planning actions that should be introduced for site preservation. Fórnia case study reveals the importance of geoheritage assessment at larger scales, as it supports all three major steps for geomorphosite management and planning : i) Identification and mapping : collection of data in the field ; ii) Evaluation : attribution of value to each geomorphological element, based on field observation and empirical knowledge of the area (specially in what concerns the vulnerability value) ; iii) Preservation : definition of protection measures. We truly believe that simple methodologies could give better results, as they do not repeat the same parameters in different moments and decrease statistical error resulting from the use of dissimilar range values during evaluation. Nevertheless, it is necessary to introduce new approaches into the geoheritage assessment, as this example represents a particular case study within a unique geomorphological context.

Haut de page

Bibliographie

Carton A., Coratza P., Marchetti M. (2005) – Guidelines for geomorphological sites mapping : examples from Italy. Géomorphologie : relief, processus, environnement 3, 209-218.

Coratza P., Giusti C. (2005) – Methodological proposal for the assessment of the scientific quality of geomorphosites. In Piacente S., Coratza P., (Eds.) : Geomorphological sites and geodiversity. Il Quaternario 18-1, 307-313.

Demek J. (Ed.) (1972) – Manual of detailed geomorphological mapping. Academia, Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, IGU, Praga, 344 p.

Ferreira A.B., Rodrigues M.L., Zêzere J.L. (1988) – Problemas da evolução geomorfológica do Maciço Calcário Estremenho. Finisterra XXIII-45, CEG, Lisboa, 5‑28.

Grandgirard V. (1999) – L’évaluation des géotopes. Geologia Insubrica, 4-1, 59-66.

Klimaszewski M. (1968) – Problems of the detailed geomorphological map. Folia Geographica, Series Geographica-Physica, vol. II, 1‑40.

Panizza M. (1972) – Schema di legenda per carte geomorfologiche di dettaglio. Boll. Soc. Geol. Italiana, 91 (2), Roma, 207‑237.

Panizza M. (2001) – Geomorphosites. Concepts, methods and examples of geomorphological survey. Chinese Science Bulletin, 46, 4-6.

Pereira P., Pereira D.I., Alves M.I.C. (2007) – Geomorphosite assessment in Montesinho Natural Park. Geographica Helvetica 62‑3, 159-168.

Reynard E. (2007) – A method for assessing the scientific and additional values of geomorphosites. Geographica Helvetica 62‑3, 1‑13.

Rodrigues M.L. (1988) – As depressões de Minde e de Alvados. Depósitos e evolução quaternária das vertentes. Dissertação de Mestrado em Geografia Física e Regional, FLUL, Lisboa, 208 p.

Rodrigues M.L. (1989) – A Fórnia de Alvados Património Paisagístico e Geomorfológico. II Congresso de Áreas Protegidas, vol. Comunicações, Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisboa, 115‑121.

Rodrigues M.L. (1991) – Depósitos e evolução quaternária das vertentes nas depressões de Minde e de Alvados (Maciço Calcário Estremenho, Portugal). Finisterra XXVI-51, Lisboa, 5‑26.

Rodrigues M.L. (1995) – Évolution quaternaire des versants, dissolution et karsification dans le Massif Calcaire de l’Estremadura. Livret‑guide de l’excursion Massif de Sicó, Massif Calcaire de l’Estremadura, Table‑ronde franco‑portugaise “Le karst au Portugal (Géomorphologie, Spéléologie, Etudes Environnementales)”, Coimbra, 35‑54.

Rodrigues M.L. (1996) – Morphostrutural conditions, slope deposits, and environmental problems in the Estremadura Limestone Massif (Portugal). In Ferreira A.B., Vieira G.T. (Eds.) : Fifth European Intensive Course on Applied Geomorphology. Mediterranean and Urban Areas, ERASMUS, publ. 9, CEG, university Lisboa, Lisboa, 121‑133.

Rodrigues M.L. (1998) – Evolução geomorfológica quaternária e dinâmica actual. Aplicações ao ordenamento do território. Exemplos no Maciço Calcário Estremenho. Dissertação de Doutoramento em Geografia Física, universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, 868 p.

Rodrigues M.L. (2004) – Relict crionival deposits in a limestone massif (Central Portugal). 1st General Assembly of the European Geoscience Union, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Nice, Volume 6, 04928-1.

Rodrigues M.L. (2005) – Crionival limestone deposits. An ancient complex in central Portugal (Western Iberia). Sixth International Conference on Geomorphology - Geomorphology in regions of environmental contrasts, Zaragoza, Abstracts Volume, 226.

Rodrigues M.L. (2008) – The Fórnia reculée : an international quaternary geoheritage. 33rd International Geological Congress (IGC), Oslo, Norway, CD-ROM, 943-944.

Rodrigues M.L., Fonseca, A. (2009) – Geopatrimónio e Desenvolvimento Sustentável. Estratégias de valorização de áreas rurais. In Moreno L, Sánchez M.M., Simões O. (Eds.) : Cultura, Inovação e Território. Sociedade Portuguesa de Estudos Rurais, Lisboa, 143‑152.

Haut de page

Annexe

Version abrégée en français

L’identification et l’évaluation des géomorphosites sont un important objectif de recherche en ce qui concerne les travaux sur la géodiversité et le patrimoine géomorphologique. Jusqu’à aujourd’hui, de nombreux auteurs ont utilisé des critères qualitatifs et quantitatifs pour évaluer les géomorphosites. L’utilisation de méthodes quantitatives, qui essaient de réduire la subjectivité de l’évaluation a eu comme résultat une utilisation de nombreux paramètres et variables, utilisés parfois à plusieurs reprises ou avec des objectifs en partie supposés. Il faut dire que les problèmes liés à l’échelle de réalisation et la publication des cartes du patrimoine géomorphologique sont un sujet qui n’a pas encore été dûment discuté. A. Carton et al. (2005) ont parlé de cette problématique mais il est nécessaire de traiter plus en détail cet aspect de la recherche. Dans le présent article, on traitera du patrimoine géomorphologique de la Fórnia, située dans le Massif Calcaire de l’Estremadura (Portugal), et des problèmes qui résultent de l’application des méthodologies d’évaluation existantes dans les travaux réalisés à grande échelle, notamment en relation avec l’importance de préserver les géosites.
En effet, la Fórnia (fig. 3) est un géomorphosite de valeur nationale (voire même internationale), qui rassemble des formes et des processus karstiques (exsurgences permanentes et saisonnières, grottes, chutes d’eau et pertes), des dépôts hérités des périodes froides du Quaternaire, liés à des environnements influencés par le gel et la neige (on y retrouve en bon état de préservation presque toute la séquence de ces dépôts : voir fig. 5 et 6). Étant donné l’importance de ces dépôts, en tant que patrimoine géomorphologique à préserver, avec différents degrés de vulnérabilité, en fonction principalement de leur accessibilité et de leur degré de consolidation, on a effectué dans un premier temps l’évaluation des dépôts quaternaires (fig. 6). Les paramètres utilisés sont très simples et les scores obtenus peuvent être consultés dans le tab. 1. L’évaluation du géomorphosite de la Fórnia en tant qu’ensemble a été effectuée dans un deuxième temps. Le score obtenu a été élevé mais il n’est pas possible d’observer les problèmes liés, par exemple, à des différences de vulnérabilité des éléments qui font partie du géomorphosite.
Quand on travaille à des échelles plus petites, les processus d’évaluation ont comme fondement la somme des différentes valeurs associées à des géomorphosites. D’ordinaire, ceux-ci sont considérés en tant que paysages, groupes de formes ou de dépôts, reléguant au second plan l’individualité de chaque élément géomorphologique. Quand nous introduisons des travaux à grande échelle dans le processus d’évaluation, la possibilité d’analyser chaque élément de façon indépendante permet de réduire la subjectivité et permet aussi de mieux comprendre les actions de planification et de gestion qui doivent être introduites pour aboutir à une préservation correcte du géosite.

Haut de page

Table des illustrations

Titre Fig. 1 – Location sketch of the Estremadura Limestone Massif. Fig. 1 – Carte de localisation du Massif Calcaire de l’Estremadura.
Légende A : Alvados ; M : Minde ; Md : Mendiga.A : Alvados ; M : Minde ; Md : Mendiga.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/7924/img-1.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 212k
Titre Fig. 2 – Geomorphologic map of the Estremadura Limestone Massif (after Ferreira et al., 1988). Fig. 2 – Carte geomorphologique du Massif Calcaire de l’Estremadura (d’après Ferreira et al., 1988).
Légende 1 : fault scarp and anticline slope ; 2 : overthrust ; 3 : erosion area ; 4 : rocky edge slope ; 5 : monocline relief ; 6 : erosion area (Tagus Basin) ; 7 : hogback ; 8 : Richter slope ; 9 : horizontal surface ; 10 : slope top and bottom ; 11 : diapiric area ; 12 : fault ; 13 : fracture ; 14 : flexure ; 15 : topographic dip ; 16 : Ourém basin limit ; 17 : S. Mamede sandstones ; 18 : St. António and S. Mamede plateaus higher levels ; 19 : Fátima platform ; 20 : Mendiga depression and Murteira-Carvalheiro level ; 21 : Polje of Minde and Alvados depression ; 22 : ancient littoral platform ; 23 : Tagus substructural level ; 24 : well-defined karst depression ; 25 : not well-defined karst depression ; 26 : inlaid karst depression ; 27 : river and gorge ; 28 : gully ; 29 : shallow, underground river and karst outlet ; 30 : approximate height ; 31 : altitude (in m).1 : escarpement de faille et flanc anticlinal ; 2 : chevauchement ; 3 : surface d’érosion ; 4 : crête rocheuse ; 5 : relief en structure monoclinale ; 6 : surface d’érosion (Bassin du Tage) ; 7 : crêt monoclinal ; 8 : versant de Richter ; 9 : surface horizontale ; 10 : sommet et base du versant ; 11 : diapir ; 12 : faille ; 13 : fracture ; 14 : flexure ; 15 : déclivité du terrain ; 16 : limite du bassin d’Ourém ; 17 : grès de S. Mamede ; 18 : niveaux d’érosion supérieurs des plateaux de St. António et de S. Mamede ; 19 : plateforme de Fátima ; 20 : dépression de Mendiga et niveau de Murteira-Carvalheiro ; 21 : poljé de Minde et dépression d’Alvados ; 22 : plateforme littorale ancienne ; 23 : niveau substructural du Tage ; 24 : dépression karstique bien définie ; 25 : dépression karstique mal définie ; 26 : dépression karstique incrustée ; 27 : cours d’eau et gorge ; 28 : ravin ; 29 : perte, rivière souterraine et résurgence ; 30 : altitude estimée ; 31 : altitude (en m).
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/7924/img-2.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 868k
Titre Fig. 3 – General perspective of Fórnia (Estremadura Limestone Massif, Portugal).Fig. 3 – Vue d’ensemble de la Fórnia (Massif Calcaire de l’Estremadura, Portugal).
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/7924/img-3.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 476k
Titre Fig. 4 – Detailed photograph of the C3 deposit (Fórnia, Estremadura Limestone Massif).Fig. 4 – Photographie détaillée du dépôt C3 (Fórnia, Massif Calcaire de l’Estremadura).
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/7924/img-4.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 520k
Titre Fig. 5 – Detailed geomorphological map of Fórnia (after Rodrigues, 1998). Fig. 5 – Carte géomorphologique détaillée de la Fórnia (d’après Rodrigues, 1998).
Légende 1 : contour line (in m) ; 2 : local altitude (in m) ; 3 : limit of geological formation or deposit ; 4 : compact limestones ; 5 : marly limestones ; 6 : marls ; 7 : clays ; 8 : structural ridge > 10 m ; 9 : structural ridge < 10 m ; 10 : structural ridge with shelter ; 11 : karst depression ; 12 : karsified limestone partially covered with terra rossa ; 13 : karsified limestone ; 14 : exhumed karren ; 15 : consolidated cryoclastic deposit ; 16 : ridge on cryoclastic deposit ; 17 : solifluction deposit ; 18 : talus scree ; 19 : scree corridor in V ; 20 : scree corridor in U ; 21 : area affected by rock fall with defined scar ; 22 : area affected by rock fall without scar ; 23 : individual rock fall ; 24 : isolated block fall ; 25 : bloch slide ; 26 : preserved rock fall ; 27 : rock fall limit ; 28 : collapsed ridge ; 29 : collapsed cryoclastic deposit ; 30 : reverse slope ; 31 : gully ; 32 : gully > 2 m ; 33 : gully head ; 34 : rill ; 35 : overland flow ; 36 : top and slope base ; 37 : slope (< 15º) ; 38 : slope (15º-25º) ; 39 : slope (> 25º) ; 40 : local base ; 41 : pass ; 42 : glacis ; 43 : erosional ridge ; 44 : direction of slope ; 45 : talus cone ; 46 : colluvial > 30 cm ; 47 : colluvial < 30 cm ; 48 : V shaped valley ; 49 : U shaped valley ; 50 : suspended valley ; 51 : knick ; 52 : alluvial deposits ; 53 : river embankment ; 54 : perennial stream ; 55 : temporary stream ; 56 : perennial exsurgence ; 57 : temporary exsurgence ; 58 : exsurgence from cave ; 59 : insurgence ; 60 : groupe of houses ; 61 : isolated house ; 62 : road.1 : courbe de niveau (en m) ; 2 : altitude local (en m) ; 3 : limite de formation géologique ou de dépôt ; 4 : calcaires compacts ; 5 : calcaires marneux ; 6 : marnes ; 7 : argiles ; 8 : corniche structurale > 10 m ; 9 : corniche structurale < 10 m ; 10 : corniche structurale avec abri sous-roche ; 11 : dépression karstique ; 12 : calcaire karstifié partiellement couvert de terra rossa ; 13 : calcaire karstifié ; 14 : lapiás exhumés ; 15 : dépôt de gélifracts consolidé ; 16 : corniche dans un dépôt de gélifracts ; 17 : dépôt de coulée de solifluxion ; 18 : talus de gravité ; 19 : couloir de talus en V ; 20 : couloir de talus en U ; 21 : surface affectée par un éboulement rocheux avec cicatrice d’arrachement nette ; 22 : surface affectée par un éboulement rocheux sans cicatrice d’arrachement visible ; 23 : éboulement isolé ; 24 : chute de bloc isolé ; 25 : bloc glissé ; 26 : éboulement préservé ; 27 : limite d’éboulement ; 28 : chute de corniche ; 29 : chute de dépôt cryoclastique ; 30 : contre-pente ; 31 : ravine ; 32 : ravine > 2 m ; 33 : partie amont de ravine ; 34 : rigole ; 35 : écoulement diffus ; 36 : haut et base du versant ; 37 : pente (< 15º) ; 38 : pente (15º-25º) ; 39 : pente > 25º ; 40 : niveau de base local ; 41 : col ; 42 : glacis ; 43 : crête d’érosion ; 44 : direction de la pente ; 45 : cône d’éboulis ; 46 : colluvium > 30 cm ; 47 : colluvium < 30 cm ; 48 : vallée en V ; 49 : vallée en U ; 50 : vallée suspendue ; 51 : point de résistance ; 52 : dépôt alluvial ; 53 : levée de berge ; 54 : cours d’eau permanent ; 55 : cours d’eau temporaire ; 56 : exurgence permanente ; 57 : exurgence temporaire ; 58 : exurgence de grotte ; 59 : perte ; 60 : habitat groupé ; 61 : habitat isolé ; 62 : route.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/7924/img-5.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 2,9M
Titre Fig. 6 – Location of the relict cryonival deposits within Fórnia. Fig. 6 – Localisation des dépôts hérités de périodes froides dans la Fórnia.
Légende 1 : scree deposit ; 2 : solifluction deposit ; 3 : cryoclastic deposit ; 4 : code.1 : talus de gravité ; 2 : dépôt de coulée de solifluxion ; 3 : dépôts cryoclastiques ; 4 : code.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/7924/img-6.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 388k
Haut de page

Pour citer cet article

Référence papier

Maria Luísa Rodrigues et André Fonseca, « Geoheritage assessment based on large-scale geomorphological mapping: contributes from a Portuguese limestone massif example », Géomorphologie : relief, processus, environnement, vol. 16 - n° 2 | 2010, 189-198.

Référence électronique

Maria Luísa Rodrigues et André Fonseca, « Geoheritage assessment based on large-scale geomorphological mapping: contributes from a Portuguese limestone massif example », Géomorphologie : relief, processus, environnement [En ligne], vol. 16 - n° 2 | 2010, mis en ligne le 01 juillet 2012, consulté le 20 août 2017. URL : http://geomorphologie.revues.org/7924 ; DOI : 10.4000/geomorphologie.7924

Haut de page

Auteurs

Maria Luísa Rodrigues

Geographic Studies Centre of the Lisbon University (CEG-UL) - TERRITUR and Research Group on Geodiversity, Geotourism and Geomorphologic Heritage (GEOPAGE) - Instituto de Geografia e Ordenamento do Território - Edifício da Faculdade de Letras - Cidade Universitária - 1600-214 Lisboa - Portugal (luisa.rodrigues@mail.telepac.pt)

André Fonseca

Geographic Studies Centre of the Lisbon University (CEG-UL) - TERRITUR and Research Group on Geodiversity, Geotourism and Geomorphologic Heritage (GEOPAGE) - Instituto de Geografia e Ordenamento do Território - Edifício da Faculdade de Letras - Cidade Universitária - 1600-214 Lisboa - Portugal (paxxiuta@gmail.com)

Haut de page

Droits d’auteur

© Groupe français de géomorphologie

Haut de page
  • Logo CNRS - Institut des sciences humaines et sociales
  • Logo Groupe français de géomorphologie
  • Revues.org