Navigation – Plan du site

Introduction to the thematic issue: “Biogeomorphology: as fundamental as fun”

Introduction au numéro thématique : « La biogéomorphologie : aussi fondamentale que plaisante »
Samuel Etienne
p. 323-326

Texte intégral

1Reviewing Biogeomorphology, the seminal book edited by H. Viles (1988), N. Cox did not hide his feelings about this ought-to-be new branch of geomorphology: “while much of biogeomorphology is obviously fun, it is not so obviously fundamental”. It is true that, at first glance, the funny or sometimes odd side of biogeomorphological researches appears more important than its scientific value: mapping underground network of rabbit burrows in a dune via transmitter-wearing rabbits (Butler, 1995), using rock striations made by rockhopper penguin feet as palaeosea-level indicators (Splettstoesser, 1985), quantifying antelope trampling in hyper-arid areas (Boelhouwers and Scheepers, 2004), or evaluating sediment sieving and transport by ants (Richards, 2009; fig. 1). Such research arouses for a moment more smiles than esteem. Does biogeomorphology have the same status in geosciences than the chemistry fair fun set in Lavoisier’s science? For the last two decades, several special issues of international journals have fed the debate (Naylor et al., 2002; Urban and Daniels, 2006), showing that diversity in biogeomorphological researches is not a weakness - hiding the absence of federative paradigm - but a strength enhancing interdisciplinary dialog (Viles and Naylor, 2002).  Biogeomorphology has then emerged as an innovative scientific field contributing to the development of geobiology (the study of biosphere-lithosphere interactions) where the notion of biocomplexity is an integrating pivot of research efforts in life sciences, natural sciences, social and economic sciences and numerical modelling (Naylor, 2005).

Fig. 1 – A « torus », circular mound built by Aphaenogaster ants at the exit of their funnel-shaped pit, Stuart Highway 87, Northern Territories, Australia.

Fig. 1 – A « torus », circular mound built by Aphaenogaster ants at the exit of their funnel-shaped pit, Stuart Highway 87, Northern Territories, Australia.

Aphaenogaster is one of the most active ant genus in Australia. These ants proceed to a dense bioturbation of soil horizons, sometimes down to 2 m deep, modifying soil texture and its hydrological properties. This type of ephemeral mounds is very sensitive to rainwash erosion. Diametre: c. 15 cm (picture: S. Etienne, 12 July, 2009).

2Some traditional subfields of geomorphology are intrinsically biogeomorphological, even if their long lasting history of studies (previous to the “invention” of biogeomorphology by Viles) do not associate them specifically with biogeomorphology: a coastal dune is a biogeomorphological landform (vegetation creates and maintains favourable conditions to its growth, hence maintaining the landform), similar to coral or annelid reefs. Ecological works by H. Cowles on dunes around Lake Michigan were the first to demonstrate feedback loops between vegetation dynamics and landforms dynamics (Cowles, 1899, quoted by Stallins, 2006 and Corenblit et al., 2007). But, using biological objects in the geomorphological research field is not a guarantee of a biogeomorphological approach: lichenometry, for example, is not a biogeomorphological method; it is solely a landform dating method using living organism. The same statement also stands for dendrochronology, silenometry, and chronopedology (Etzelmüller et al., 2007), though trees can be useful indicators recording geomorphic events in their own physiognomy (mass movements, volcanic eruptions, glacial fluctuations, earthquakes; Solomina, 2002). The multiplication of dendrogeomorphological works - a branch invented in the 1970’s by J. Shroder Jr (1975, 1978) - in the past decade testifies for the renewal of the consideration of tree utility in the geomorphological debate, the scientific background being more favourable to the integration of biological indicators.

3Researches linking geomorphology, biogeography and ecology have been more numerous in the past years, allowing a better understanding of processes and mechanisms controlling living communities’ development or landforms at different scales. Although these research endeavours are interdisciplinary, they are often guided by basic interrogations and their outcomes are fed unilaterally by either the geomorphological or the ecological debate, but rarely by both simultaneously. For example, which is it? Do ecological factors control the development of a landform? Or do geomorphological factors control the ecological networks? A possible explanation to this decoupling could be the present incompatibility of the studied spaces: discrete landforms in the geomorphological space pertain to a different logic than the ecological spatial matrix. Two similar landforms are not necessarily similar ecological objects: morphogenic processes might be the same, but ecological strategies (reproduction, opportunism, risk, survival) might be strongly different (Urban and Daniels, 2006). Thus, a unique landform becomes several possible habitats when the “biological utility” is the main analysis criterion. R. Spröte et al. (this issue) have adopted this federative approach, linking the study of vegetation succession, soil hydrological properties evolution and concomitant landform triggering effect to these dynamics. Diversity of biological soil crusts appears as the expression of these modifications. These microbial ecosystems are a poorly developed research area in geomorphology, but C. Allen (this issue) enumerates the multiple scientific benefits that could arise from geomorphological and ecological crossover. Beyond fundamental research, integrating both geomorphological and ecological discourses has already demonstrated its social utility in environmental management politics (Urban and Daniels, 2006), and this is also one of the major possible applied issues of biological soil crust research (Allen, this issue).

4Two domains seem to emerge in the heuristic space of biogeomorphology: biological weathering and fluvial biogeomorphology. The first one takes benefits from ancient and numerous studies in geomicrobiology (Krumbein, 1972; Ehrlich, 1981; Ehrlich and Newman, 2009), with the discipline of geomorphology bringing the conceptual tools necessary to jump from the microscopic scale to the landscape scale. Microorganisms have been neglected as morphogenic agents except in soil studies. However, if their weathering mechanisms can be better studied at the microscopic scale (Song et al., this issue), their effects could be applicable from the scanning electronic microscope scale to the satellite scale (Allen, this issue). The sequence of mineral susceptibility, formulated by S. Goldich (1938), has been a dominant theory for more than fifty years and, based on deduction, utilises laws of thermodynamics (Bowen’s sequence of minerals crystallising from a melt). Through in vitro experiments, W. Song et al. (this issue) demonstrate, after T. Wasklewicz (1994) in a natural field setting, that this sequence is invalid in a sterile environment with several shifts appearing in the absence of the biological “spice”. J.R. Vidal Romani et al. (this issue) present a synthesis on microorganisms’ relative role in the development of speleothems in granitic terrains, underscoring this formerly “difficult to study” property of bacteria that are able to “move chemical reactions in directions other than predicted by the laws of chemistry” (Birot, 1981, p. 114). Here, the mineralogy of speleothem appears as an indicator of the biological component’s intensity in terms of weathering rock masses. Fluvial biogeomorphology is faithful to the image of its mother-discipline: fluvial dynamics. Riparian forests, as a regulator and an indicator of the river dynamics (Hughes, 1997), was already a “hot spot” of geomorphology research in the 1990’s (Dorn, 2002), while under the scope of a renovated catastrophism, the study of extreme events (rare and very destructive) emerged as a new fashion in geosciences (Schneider, 2009). S. Dufour and H. Piégay (this issue) explore precisely the impact of mean perturbations (more frequent, but less destructive at the instantaneous scale) on the resilience of the riparian vegetation, considering at the same time the role of external factors (e.g., channel mobility) in the ecosystem dynamics.

5J. Stallins (2006) has proposed a synthesis which offers theoretical basis for future works. Such research should consider interactions between geomorphology and ecology and also consider key issues like multiple causality, the influence of organisms that function as ecosystem engineers (which allows to observe process/form interactions at different scale levels), the expression of an ecological topology (spatial dimensions of biogeomorphological dynamics split into stable, autoregulated areas, and transitory, more flexible areas), and ecological memory (e.g., biogeomorphological properties of a dune system are not independent from perturbations, i.e. storm overwash which reshape the dune). Papers in this thematic issue illustrate the different stages of biogeomorphology’s development. While it may still be stammering and exploratory in some areas, its thoughts are more advanced in other domains and contribute deeply to the renewal of the geomorphological pensée. Biogeomorphology: it is certainly fun, but also obviously fundamental!

Haut de page

Bibliographie

Birot P. (1981)Les processus d’érosion à la surface des continents. Masson, Paris, 608 p.

Boelhouwers J., Scheepers T. (2004) – The role of antelope trampling on scarp erosion in a hyper-arid environment, Skeleton Coast, Namibia. Journal of Arid Environments 58, 4, 545-557.

Butler D.R. (1995)Zoogeomorphology: animals as geomorphic agents. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 239 p.

Corenblit D., Tabacchi E., Steiger J., Gurnell A.M. (2007) – Reciprocal interactions and adjustments between fluvial landforms and vegetation dynamics in river corridors: A review of complementary approaches. Earth-Science Reviews 84, 1-2, 56-86.

Cowles H.C. (1899) – The ecological relations of vegetation on the sand dunes of Lake Michigan. Botanical Gazette 27, 95-117.

Cox N.J. (1989) – Review of Biogeomorphology. Progress in Physical Geography13, 620-624.

Dorn R.I. (2002) – Analysis of geomorphology citations in the last quarter of the 20th century. Geomorphology 27, 667-672.

Ehrlich H.L. (1981)Geomicrobiology. Dekker, New York, 408 p.

Ehrlich H.L., Newman D.K. (2009)Geomicrobiology. Fifth edition, CRC, New York, 628 p.

Etzelmüller B., Warburton J., Mercier D., Etienne S., Frauenfelder R. (2007) – Chapter 2 - Analysis of Sediment Storage: Geological and geomorphological context. In Beylich A.A, Warburton J. (Eds): SEDIFLUX Manual, Analysis of Source-to-Sink-Fluxes and Sediment Budgets in Changing High-Latitude and High-Altitude Cold Environments. Norges Geologiske Undersøkelse, NGU-report, 53, 37-60.

Goldich S.S. (1938) – A study in rock-weathering. Journal of Geology 46, 17-58.

Hughes F.M.R. (1997) – Floodplain biogeomorphology. Progress in Physical Geography 21, 501-529.

Krumbein W.E. (1972) – Rôle des microorganismes dans la genèse, la diagenèse et la dégradation des roches en place. Revue d'Ecologie et de Biologie du Sol, 9, 283-319.  

Naylor L.A. (2005) – The contributions of biogeomorphology to the emerging field of geobiology. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 219, 35-51.

Naylor L.A., Viles H.A., Carter N.E.A. (2002) – Biogeomorphology revisited: looking towards the future, Geomorphology 47-1, 3-14.

Richards P.J. (2009)Aphaenogaster ants as bioturbators: impacts on soil and slope processes, Earth-Science Reviews 96, 1-2, 92-106.

Schneider J.L. (2009) Les traumatismes de la Terre. Géologie des phénomènes naturels extrêmes. Société Géologique de France, Vuibert, Paris, 198 p.

Shroder J.F. Jr (1975) – Dendrogeomorphological analysis of mass movement. Proceedings, Association of American Geographers 7, 222-226.

Shroder J.F. Jr (1978) – Dendrogeomorphological analysis of mass movement on Table Cliffs Plateau, Utah. Quaternary Research 9-2, 168-185.

Solomina O.N. (2002) – Dendrogeomorphology: research requirements. Dendrochronologia 20, 233-245.

Splettstoesser J.F. (1985) – Note on rock striations caused by penguin feet, Falkland Islands. Arctic and Alpine Research 17, 107-111.

Stallins J.A. (2006)– Geomorphology and ecology: unifying themes for complex systems in biogeomorphology. Geomorphology 77, 3-4, 207-216.

Urban M.A., Daniels M. (2006) – Introduction: exploring the links between geomorphology and ecology, Geomorphology 77, 3-4, 203-206.

Viles H.A. (Ed.) (1988)Biogeomorphology. Blackwell, Oxford, 352 p.

Viles H.A., Naylor L.A. (2002) – Editorial. Geomorphology 47, 1, 1-2.

Wasklewicz T.A. (1994) – Importance of environment on the order of mineral weathering in olivine basalts, Hawaii. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 19, 715-734.

Haut de page

Annexe

Texte en français

Recensant l’ouvrage séminal coordonné par H. Viles (1988), Biogeomorphology, N. Cox (1989) ne cachait pas son sentiment vis-à-vis de cette nouvelle branche de la géomorphologie : « while much of biogeomorphology is obviously fun, it is not so obviously fundamental ». Et il est vrai que, sur l’instant, le côté ludique voire excentrique des recherches biogéomorphologiques semble parfois l’emporter sur leur portée scientifique : équiper des lapins d’émetteurs afin de cartographier le réseau de tunnels intradunaires (Butler, 1995), transformer les striations pédestres du gorfou sauteur en indicateurs de paléo-niveaux marins (Splettstoesser, 1985), quantifier l’impact érosif du piétinement des antilopes en milieu hyper-aride (Boelhouwers et Scheepers, 2004), évaluer le transport ou le tri de particules par les fourmis (Richards, 2009 ; fig. 1), tout cela porte de prime abord davantage à sourire qu’à considération. La biogéomorphologie serait-elle aux géosciences ce qu’est la chimie amusante à la science de Lavoisier ? Au cours des deux dernières décennies, plusieurs numéros spéciaux de revues internationales sont venus enrichir le débat (Naylor et al., 2002 ; Urban et Daniels, 2006), démontrant que la diversité des recherches biogéomorphologiques constituait non pas une faiblesse - celle-là pouvant masquer l’absence de paradigme fédérateur -, mais davantage une force en stimulant le dialogue interdisciplinaire (Viles et Naylor, 2002). La biogéomorphologie s’est ainsi affirmée comme une discipline novatrice, contribuant au développement de la géobiologie (étude des interactions biosphère-lithosphère) dont la notion de biocomplexité constitue un pivot intégrateur des recherches en sciences de la vie, de la nature, sciences économiques et sociales et modélisation numérique (Naylor, 2005).

Fig. 1 – Un « tore », monticule circulaire construit à l’exutoire d’un nid de fourmis du genre Aphaenogaster, Stuart Highway 87, Territoires du Nord, Australie.

Fig. 1 – Un « tore », monticule circulaire construit à l’exutoire d’un nid de fourmis du genre Aphaenogaster, Stuart Highway 87, Territoires du Nord, Australie.

Le genre Aphaenogaster compte, parmi les bioturbateurs, les plus actives espèces de fourmis fouisseuses d’Australie. Elles participent à une intense bioturbation des horizons pédologiques supérieurs parfois jusqu’à deux mètres de profondeur, modifiant la texture du sol et ses propriétés hydrologiques. Ce type de monticules éphémères est particulièrement sensible à l’érosion pluviale. Diamètre : 15 cm environ (cliché S. Etienne, 12 juillet 2009).

Certains domaines de la géomorphologie sont biogéomorphologiques par essence, même si l’ancienneté de leur étude (préalable à l’« invention » de la biogéomorphologie par Viles) n’incite pas à les y classer spécifiquement : une dune littorale est une construction biogéomorphologique (la plante crée et entretient les conditions favorables au développement de la forme), un récif corallien, un bioherme de même. Les travaux écologiques de H. Cowles sur les dunes du lac Michigan furent parmi les premiers à montrer les boucles de rétroaction entre dynamiques des végétaux et dynamiques géomorphologiques (Cowles, 1899, cité par Stallins, 2006 et Corenblit et al., 2007). Mais il ne suffit pas de mobiliser un objet biologique dans le champ de la recherche géomorphologique pour faire de la biogéomorphologie : la lichénométrie n’est pas une méthode biogéomorphologique, il s’agit tout au plus d’une technique qui utilise un organisme vivant à des fins de datation des modelés. Idem pour la dendrochronologie, la silénométrie ou la chronopédologie (Etzelmüller et al., 2007). Cependant, les arbres peuvent être des indicateurs de morphodynamiques particulières (mouvements de masse, éruptions volcaniques, fluctuations glaciaires, séismes ; Solomina, 2002) qu’ils enregistrent dans leur propre physionomie : la multiplication des travaux de dendrogéomorphologie - inventée dans les années 1970 par J. Shroder Jr (1975, 1978) - au cours de la décennie passée témoigne de ce renouvellement du regard que porte le géomorphologue sur les arbres dans un contexte scientifique devenu plus favorable à l’intégration de ces indicateurs biologiques.

Les recherches associant géomorphologie, biogéographie et écologie se sont multipliées ces dernières années, permettant de mieux préciser les processus et les mécanismes régulant le développement des communautés vivantes ou celui des formes et des microformes du relief. Bien que souvent interdisciplinaires, ces recherches sont toutefois fréquemment guidées par des questionnements basiques dont les issues reviennent à alimenter de manière unilatérale le débat géomorphologique ou écologique, plus rarement les deux simultanément : quels facteurs écologiques contrôlent le développement de telle ou telle (micro)forme ? Quels facteurs géomorphologiques contrôlent les réseaux écologiques ? Une possible explication de ce découplage réside dans l’incompatibilité actuelle des espaces étudiés : la discrétisation géomorphologique du relief répond à une autre logique que le découpage écologique. Deux objets géomorphologiques identiques ne représentent pas forcément la même catégorie d’objets écologiques : là où commandent des processus morphodynamiques identiques répondent des stratégies reproductrices, opportunistes, de risques ou de survie différentes (Urban et Daniels, 2006). Une même forme, un même modelé peuvent se décliner en de nombreux habitats possibles lorsque leur « utilité biologique » devient le critère d’analyse. R. Spröte et al. (ce numéro) ont justement fait preuve d’une démarche fédératrice associant l’étude des successions végétales avec les modifications des propriétés hydrologiques des sols, tout en évaluant l’influence du modelé sur ces évolutions. Les croûtes cryptogamiques deviennent alors un élément exprimant, par leur diversité, ces modifications. Ces écosystèmes microbiens constituent un axe de recherche peu développé en géomorphologie, pourtant C. Allen (ce numéro) inventorie les multiples bénéfices scientifiques possibles qui résulteraient du croisement des recherches écologiques et géomorphologiques. Au-delà de la recherche fondamentale, l’intégration des deux discours, géomorphologique et écologique, a démontré son utilité sociale au sein de politiques de gestion environnementale (Urban et Daniels, 2006), c’est aussi une des issues appliquées de la recherche sur les croûtes cryptogamiques (Allen, ce numéro).

Deux domaines semblent s’affirmer assez franchement dans l’espace heuristique biogéomorphologique : la biométéorisation et la biogéomorphologie fluviale. La première bénéficie du terreau favorable développé par les recherches, nombreuses et anciennes, en géomicrobiologie (Krumbein, 1972 ; Ehrlich, 1981 ; Ehrlich et Newman, 2009), la géomorphologie offrant le saut d’échelle nécessaire au passage de l’échelle microscopique à celle des formes de terrain. Les micro-organismes sont longtemps restés des agents morphogéniques négligés en dehors du champ de la pédologie, pourtant si leurs mécanismes s’observent à une échelle microscopique (Song et al., ce numéro), leurs effets peuvent être détectés de l’échelle du microscope électronique à balayage jusqu’à l’échelle satellitale (Allen, ce numéro). La séquence d’altération des minéraux de S. Goldich (1938) a été la théorie dominante pendant plus d’un demi-siècle ; elle repose, par déduction, sur les lois de la thermodynamique (série de cristallisation progressive d’un magma de Bowen). Par le biais de l’expérimentation in vitro, W. Song et al. démontrent, après T. Wasklewicz (1994) en milieu naturel, que cette séquence est invalide en ambiance stérile, de nombreuses interversions apparaissant en l’absence de l’épice « bio ». J.R. Vidal Romani et al. (ce numéro) nous offrent une remarquable synthèse sur le rôle relatif des micro-organismes dans le développement des spéléothèmes en terrains granitiques, illustrant cette propriété - jadis « délicate à étudier » - des bactéries à « déplacer le sens des réactions prévues par les lois chimiques s.s., en favorisant tantôt la dissolution, tantôt la précipitation » (Birot, 1981, p. 114). La nature minéralogique du spéléothème apparaît alors comme un indicateur du degré d’implication des microorganismes dans l’altération des masses rocheuses. La biogéomorphologie fluviale est quant à elle fidèle à l’image de sa discipline mère et de son objet d’étude : extrêmement dynamique. La ripisylve, en tant que régulatrice et indicatrice de la dynamique fluviale (Hughes, 1997), a même constitué un véritable « point chaud » de la recherche géomorphologique au cours des années 1990 (Dorn, 2002). A l’heure où, sous couvert d’un néo-catastrophisme raisonné, l’étude des perturbations extrêmes (rares et très destructrices) émerge comme un thème à la mode en sciences de la Terre (Schneider, 2009), S. Dufour et H. Piégay (ce numéro) proposent d’explorer très finement l’impact des perturbations moyennes (plus fréquentes et moins destructrices sur l’instant) sur la résilience de la végétation riveraine en tenant compte du rôle des facteurs externes (mobilité du tronçon) dans la dynamique de l’écosystème.

J. Stallins (2006) a proposé une synthèse qui pose les bases théoriques d’études futures qui prendraient en compte les interactions à double sens entre géomorphologie et écologie et s’attarderaient sur des notions clés telles que la causalité multiple, l’importance relative des espèces ingénieurs (qui permettent d’entrevoir les interactions processus/formes à différents niveaux d’échelle), la topologie écologique (dimensions spatiales des dynamiques biogéomorphologiques éclatées entre domaines de stabilité autorégulés et domaines de transition plus malléables) ou la mémoire écologique - par exemple, les propriétés biogéomorphologiques d’une dune ne sont pas indépendantes de la fréquence des perturbations, i.e. les débordement de tempêtes, qui remodèlent la dune -. Les différentes contributions de ce numéro thématique illustrent donc le stade de développement de la biogéomorphologie : encore balbutiante et exploratrice dans certains domaines, ses réflexions sont déjà fort avancées dans d’autres et contribuent au renouvellement de la pensée géomorphologique. La biogéomorphologie : plaisante, certes… fondamentale, assurément !

Haut de page

Table des illustrations

Titre Fig. 1 – A « torus », circular mound built by Aphaenogaster ants at the exit of their funnel-shaped pit, Stuart Highway 87, Northern Territories, Australia.
Légende Aphaenogaster is one of the most active ant genus in Australia. These ants proceed to a dense bioturbation of soil horizons, sometimes down to 2 m deep, modifying soil texture and its hydrological properties. This type of ephemeral mounds is very sensitive to rainwash erosion. Diametre: c. 15 cm (picture: S. Etienne, 12 July, 2009).
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/8037/img-1.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 1,6M
Titre Fig. 1 – Un « tore », monticule circulaire construit à l’exutoire d’un nid de fourmis du genre Aphaenogaster, Stuart Highway 87, Territoires du Nord, Australie.
Légende Le genre Aphaenogaster compte, parmi les bioturbateurs, les plus actives espèces de fourmis fouisseuses d’Australie. Elles participent à une intense bioturbation des horizons pédologiques supérieurs parfois jusqu’à deux mètres de profondeur, modifiant la texture du sol et ses propriétés hydrologiques. Ce type de monticules éphémères est particulièrement sensible à l’érosion pluviale. Diamètre : 15 cm environ (cliché S. Etienne, 12 juillet 2009).
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/8037/img-2.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 1,6M
Haut de page

Pour citer cet article

Référence papier

Samuel Etienne, « Introduction to the thematic issue: “Biogeomorphology: as fundamental as fun” », Géomorphologie : relief, processus, environnement, vol. 16 - n° 4 | 2010, 323-326.

Référence électronique

Samuel Etienne, « Introduction to the thematic issue: “Biogeomorphology: as fundamental as fun” », Géomorphologie : relief, processus, environnement [En ligne], vol. 16 - n° 4 | 2010, mis en ligne le 01 décembre 2012, consulté le 26 mai 2017. URL : http://geomorphologie.revues.org/8037

Haut de page

Auteur

Samuel Etienne

Université de la Polynésie française - BP 6570 - 98702 Faa’a - Tahiti - Polynésie française (samuel.etienne@upf.pf) et CNRS-UMR 6042 GEOLAB - Clermont Université

Articles du même auteur

Haut de page

Droits d’auteur

© Groupe français de géomorphologie

Haut de page
  • Logo CNRS - Institut des sciences humaines et sociales
  • Logo Groupe français de géomorphologie
  • Revues.org