Navigation – Plan du site

Morphology and geomorphological significance of relict landslides in the Tertiary basin of Puy-en-Velay (Massif Central, France)

Morphologie et signification géomorphologique des glissements de terrain anciens dans le bassin tertiaire du Puy-en-Velay (Massif Central, France)
Alexandre Poiraud et Emmanuelle Defive
p. 247-260

Résumés

L’étude d’un ensemble de glissements de terrain dans le bassin tertiaire du Puy-en-Velay (Massif Central, France) a permis de récolter des informations sur les types de glissement de terrain affectant les versants du bassin ainsi que sur les facteurs contrôlant leur répartition. Deux types de glissement apparaissent, dans des contextes morphostructuraux identiques mais se différenciant par l’âge de la couverture basaltique. Le premier facteur contrôlant la répartition des glissements est la lithologie, en particulier la présence des formations sablo-argileuses à argilo-sableuses du Tertiaire, appelées « Sables de la Laussonne » et de la fraction argilo-sableuse du Quaternaire. Le deuxième facteur est l’âge de la couverture basaltique qui détermine indirectement le degré de dissection des bassins versants. En effet, les « vieux » bassins versants présentent une morphologie plus ouverte avec une topographie plus différenciée que les bassins plus jeunes ainsi qu’une plus forte densité de glissements reliques. Ces glissements anciens sont représentés essentiellement par un type complexe avec une composante rotationnelle amont et une masse fluée, caractéristique de mouvements lents, à l’aval. Malheureusement, nous ne pouvons conclure à ce stade sur la cinématique et le rythme de ces glissements. Ces glissements anciens, facteur clé de l’évolution des bassins versants, constituent le processus majeur de recul des parois basaltiques périphériques du bassin du Puy.

Haut de page

Notes de la rédaction

Article soumis le 18 mars 2010, accepté le 13 décembre 2010

Texte intégral

Introduction

1Landslides are known to be a major process of landscape evolution (Brunsden and Thornes, 1979; Astrade et al., 1998; Brunsden, 2001; Thomas, 2001; Chang and Slaymaker, 2002; Dapples, 2002; Schmidt and Beyer, 2002; Martino et al., 2004; Dominguez-Cuesta et al., 2007; Moeyersons et al., 2008). Any study of the geomorphological evolution of a mountainous area must therefore take this process into account and try to describe it precisely. The Tertiary basin of Puy-en-Velay is known for its contribution to our knowledge of the Villafranchien period (Bout, 1960), the epigenesis of the Loire (Defive, 1996; Defive et al., 2005; Defive, 2008) and the colonisation of pre-historic man relative to climate evolution (Raynal, 1986, 1988 a and b; Raynal et al., 2001). Few studies have focused on hillslope evolution in the basin, outside those of G. Kieffer (1962), P. Bout (1974), B. Valadas (1984) and A. Le Griel (1990), who worked jointly on a large scale (Massif Central). G. Kieffer (1962) highlighted the major role of landslides and the importance of morphostructure in the back-tilting of basaltic escarpments. P. Bout (1974) and B. Valadas (1984) showed the major impact of climatic variation on the geomorphological processes, in particular the fundamental role of periglacial climate in the transit of sediment from the dismantlement of volcanic edifices by frost splitting and the extensive area covered by periglacial superficial formations. A. Le Griel (1990) made a thorough literature review on the general geomorphological evolution of the Massif Central since the Palaeozoic, pointing out the major contribution of the tectonic crisis of the Miocene and Pleistocene in explaining the present-day general morphostructure and ensuing hillslope dynamics, especially in the south-eastern Massif Central. However, the issue of the geomorphological significance and morphology of landslides in the Tertiary basin of Puy-en-Velay has never been fully addressed. The geological mapping of the southern part of the basin (national programme by BRGM, national geology research centre) and the inventory of landslides over the entire basin to map landslide proneness (Poiraud, 2007) provide new data that help to achieve a better understanding of the importance of landslides in the geomorphological evolution of the basin. The main objectives of the present work were as follows: (i) identifying the principal factors that determine the spatial pattern of relict landslides; (ii) describing the main morphology of relict landslides affecting the hillslope of the basin; (iii) providing information on the ensuing superficial formations; (iv) defining hypotheses on the role of landslides on the evolution of valleys.

Geomorphology of the basin of Puy-en-Velay

2The basin is located at approximately 45°N and 3.85°E (fig. 1). Two major volcanic areas enclose the basin: (i) the Velay massif formed by Mio-Pliocene volcanic activity (basalt and phonolite) to the southeast, and (ii) the Deves massif with Plio-Pleistocene basaltic lava flow to the west. The basin is crossed centrally from south to north by the Loire River, which controls part of the overall erosion by its incision trend. The basin corresponds to the southern extension of the West-European Rift and is directly linked to the Alpine orogeny (Michon, 2000). G. Kiefer (1962) and A. Le Griel (1990) identified the topography of the area as a peneplain of the end of the Miocene. This ante-topography was dislocated by the Pontian tectonic crisis (transition between the Miocene and Pliocene), which set the limits of the different tectonic compartments and fixed the general hydrographic network. The entire area was subject to a general uplift during the Villafranchian crisis (transition between Pliocene and Pleistocene). This major tectonic event, coupled with the cooling of the climate (first glacial period of the old Quaternary) caused the epigenesis of the Loire and corresponded to the beginning of the landscape differentiation (Bout, 1960; Kieffer, 1962; Defive, 1996; Defive et al., 2005; Defive, 2008). During the Quaternary period, the incision of the hydrographic network was coupled with an intense hillslope dynamics connected to the climatic oscillations. The periglacial conditions and the increasing of slope gradients by stream incision caused numerous landslides, shaping the current landscape (Bout, 1948; Kieffer, 1962; Bout, 1974; Valadas, 1984; Van-Vliet-Lanoë and Hallégouët, 1998). The result is a marked relief inversion, with the volcanic structure at the top and an extensive hillslope development in the sedimentary formations. This type of morphostructure is prone to landslide activity. Numerous inherited large landslides border the main valleys, probably connected with the incision timing; others are located under the basaltic escarpment at the top of hillslopes, resulting from volcanic border dismantling.

Fig. 1 – Simplified geological map of tertiary basin of Puy-en-velay.
Fig. 1 – Carte géologique simplifiée du bassin tertiaire de Puy-en-Velay.

Fig. 1 – Simplified geological map of tertiary basin of Puy-en-velay. Fig. 1 – Carte géologique simplifiée du bassin tertiaire de Puy-en-Velay.

1: study area; 2: main river; 3: elevation point; 4: city; 5: Plio-Pleistocene volcanism; 6: Mio-Pliocene volcanism; 7: Tertiary and Quaternary sediments; 8: crystalline basement.
1 : zone d’étude ; 2 : rivières principales ; 3 : côte d’altitude ; 4 : villes ; 5 : volcanisme plio-pléistocène ; 6 : volcanisme mio-pliocène ; 7 : sédiments tertiaires et quaternaires ; 8 : socle cristallin.

Relict landslide patterns

3The inventory of relict landslides was produced by aerial photography analysis and a field survey to validate the interpretation of aerial photographs. A literature review provided scant but relevant information. Twenty-nine relict landslides were mapped (7 in the Borne sector, 22 in the Laussonne sector). Fig. 2 shows the location of relict landslides in their geological context. Two significant zones appear, one along the Borne River, west of the town of Le Puy, and the other near the town of Monastier, southeast of the basin:

4- At the overall scale, landslides follow a southeast/northwest line that crosses the basin centrally. This axis corresponds to the main Hercynian fracture orientation, which determines the morphology of the basin (Scanvic et al., 1991; Michon, 2000) and the general orientation of secondary valleys (NW/SE), which are the major axes of erosion.

5- The 'Borne sector' corresponds to the border of the Plio-Pleistocene plateau of the Deves. The incision is recent (less than 2 million years old) and the border erosion of the plateau is essentially concentrated in deep, closed valleys. All the landslides arise at the border of the basaltic plateau, along the streams that incise it, and affect sectors with a height difference greater than 100 m (fig. 3). Lastly, most of the landslides affect the Quaternary formations corresponding to the palaeo-channel of the Loire and/or sediments related to volcanic dams (Defive, 1996; Defive et al., 2005). These formations are made up of sand and clay and are prone to liquefaction.

6- The 'Laussonne sector' is located at the edge of the Velay plateau. The incision is older than the preceding sector (> 7 million years old) and the valleys are deeper and wider. All the landslides arise at the border of basaltic mesa or plateaus. The altitude difference of affected hillslopes is greater than 150 m. This sector is covered by the Oligocene formation of 'Sables de la Laussonne', known for their poor mechanical properties (low cohesion and shear angle) and is prone to landsliding. We also observe that the landslides cover nearly all the hillslopes in this Tertiary sediment.

7- The centre part of the basin is devoid of relict landslides. The geological formations are essentially illitic (prone not to landsliding but to gullying) and the hillslopes are generally concave with a regular topography. This observation is particularly relevant between St-Paulien and Le Puy, where a large plateau forms a vast interfluve between the Loire and the Borne and is disconnected from the incision dynamics of both rivers. Run-off (linear or diffuse) seems to be the main process of landscape evolution.

8As principal control factors determining the pattern of relict landslide we can retain: (i) erosion level of basaltic plateau borders: this factor is determined by the age of the volcanic formations and the distance from the principal hydrographic axes of the basin; (ii) mechanical properties of the sedimentary rocks: the Quaternary formation of the palaeo-Loire River or volcanic dam and the sandy-clay formation of the Oligocene are weak and determine the vulnerability of hillslope to landsliding.

Fig. 2 – Location of relict landslides in their geological context.
Fig. 2 – Localisation des glissements anciens dans leur contexte géologique.

Fig. 2 – Location of relict landslides in their geological context. Fig. 2 – Localisation des glissements anciens dans leur contexte géologique.

1: relict landslide; 2: city; 3: major stream; 4: major fault; 5: supposed fault; 6: Mio-Pliocene volcanism; 7: Plio-Pleistocene volcanism; 8: sedimentary formations; 9: crystalline basement.
1 : glissement ancien ; 2 : ville ; 3 : cours d’eau principaux ; 4 : faille majeure ; 5 : faille supposée ; 6 : volcanisme mio-pliocène ; 7 : volcanisme plio-pléistocène ; 8 : formations sédimentaires ; 9 : socle cristallin.

Fig. 3 – Elevation distribution and vertical rise of each fossil landslide.
Fig. 3 – Altitude et dénivelé de chaque glissement de terrain.

Fig. 3 – Elevation distribution and vertical rise of each fossil landslide.Fig. 3 – Altitude et dénivelé de chaque glissement de terrain.

Morphology of relict landslide

9Morphometric measurements of relict landslides are heterogeneous. However, we highlight a difference between the two sectors. In the Borne sector, landslides cover an average surface area of 0.29 km² (s = 0.2) and has an average slope of 13.4° (s = 2.6). In the southeast sector of the Laussonne, these values are respectively 0.61 km² (s = 0.52) and 10.3° (s = 1.9). The elevation extension discussed above ranges from 114 m (s = 17.8) for the Borne sector to 155 m (s = 48.6) for the Laussonne sector. The length is between 514 m (s = 103.1) for the Borne sector and 856 m (s = 303.2) for the Laussonne sector. These two last parameters differentiate landslides in the two sectors (fig. 4). To compare landforms between the two sectors, we analysed two specific representative examples (fig. 2). The first (St-Vidal landslide, Example 1) were prospected by field observation and review of literature and engineering studies. The second (Example 2, Monastier landslides) were investigated by field observation, geological boreholes and geophysical analysis.

Fig. 4 – Height/length distribution of landslides.
Fig. 4 – Distribution des glissements selon leur longueur et leur dénivelée.

Fig. 4 – Height/length distribution of landslides. Fig. 4 – Distribution des glissements selon leur longueur et leur dénivelée.

Bold label corresponds to landslides from Borne sector and italic label corresponds to landslides from Laussonne sector.
Les labels en gras correspondent aux glissements du secteur de Borne tandis que les labels en italique correspondent aux glissements du secteur de Laussonne.

The St-Vidal landslide

10This landslide is located on the right bank of the Borne River. It covers an area of approximately 0.73 km². The basaltic plateau forms a large embayment at its border corresponding to the major scarp of the landslide (fig. 5A). Along the entire cross section AB (fig. 5B), from top to bottom, we discern three morphological areas within the landslide:

11(i) a basaltic cornice, covered by a talus scree with a slope > 30°. This is the main scarp of the landslide;

12(ii) a disturbed area with many large outcropped basaltic boulders (length >100 m) and anti-scarps. Two mounds are present upslope the anti-scarp. We observe some outcrops (point with SVF annotation in fig. 5A) characterised by a mixture of sedimentary material (grey sandy clay) and volcanic material (white tuff). The layers of formation of point SVF’ are clearly dipped to upslope, evidencing a rotational movement. This material is reworked and constitutes the matrix of the superficial formations. The general topographic profile is hummocky;

13(iii) a convex area at the bottom of the landslide. Forms are smoother than the previous area and the outcropping of basaltic boulders are less visible. Numerous convexities caused by solifluction flows characterise this part of the landslide. Along the Borne River, erosion outcrops a large weathered basaltic boulder 25 m in height. This boulder seems to be “floating” in the earth matrix and is evidence of slow flowage processes.

14The geological cross section AB (fig. 5B) was built from a field survey and analysis of neighbouring boreholes. This interpretation assumes a rotational component for the large boulders at the top, corresponding to the presumed last phases of basaltic cornice dismantling (III and II), and processes of flowage with “floating” boulders at the bottom. This hypothesis is supported by the difference in basaltic boulder weathering (oxidation spots, important friability, brightening of basaltic matrix) and size between the top part of the landslide (relatively fresh basalt and large boulder) and the bottom part (weathered basalt and dismantled boulder). This observation suggests a progressive back-tilting of the cornice rather than a single paroxysmal event. The boreholes located on the left border of the landslide (fig. 5A) show less than 10 m of reworked material. The sliding material is constituted by the Quaternary sandy clay sediments interlocked in the Tertiary illitic clays. Unfortunately, we have no data on the local hydrogeology.

Fig. 5 – Geomorphological maps and cross section of St-Vidal landslide.
Fig. 5 – Cartes géomorphologiques et coupe géologique du glissement de St-Vidal.

Fig. 5 – Geomorphological maps and cross section of St-Vidal landslide. Fig. 5 – Cartes géomorphologiques et coupe géologique du glissement de St-Vidal.

A: Geomorphological maps. 1: location of picture 2; 2: sedimentary-volcanic formations outcrop; 3: superficial borehole; 4: main scarp of little rotational landslide; 5: secondary scarp of the main landslide; 6: anti-scarp; 7: convexity; 8: main scarp of St-Vidal landslide; 9: eroded river border; 10: reverse slope; 11: pound; 12: superficial rotational landslide; 13: talus scree; 14: alluvial formation; 15: cross section; 16: elevation contour.
B: Geological cross section AB of the landslide. Pictures ph1 and ph2 appear on the cross section. 1: basaltic plateau; 2: talus scree; 3: “floating” basaltic panels; 4: dismantled panels; 5: “floating” boulders; 6: deformed Quaternary and Tertiary sediment; 7; alluvial formation; 8; colluvial formation.
A : Carte géomorphologique. 1 : localisation de la photo 2 ; 2 : affleurement de formation volcano-sédimentaire ; 3 : sondage superficiel ; 4 : escarpement principal du glissement rotationnel superficiel ; 5 : escarpement secondaire du glissement principal ; 6 : contre-escarpement ; 7 : convexité ; 8 : escarpement principal du glissement de St-Vidal ; 9 : berge érodée ; 10 : contre-pente ; 11 ; marécage ; 12 : glissement rotationnel superficiel ; 13 : talus d’éboulis ; 14 : terrasse alluviale ; 15 : coupe géologique ; 16 : courbes de niveau.
B : Coupe géologique AB du glissement. Les photos ph1 et ph2 sont indiquées sur la coupe. 1 : plateau basaltique ; 2 : talus d’éboulis ; 3 : panneau basaltique flué ; 4 : panneau disloqué ; 5 : blocs basaltiques flués dans la masse ; 6 : matériaux sédimentaires tertiaires et quaternaires déformés ; 7 : formation alluviale ; 8 : formation colluviale.

The Monastier landslides

15These landslides are located at the north face of the basaltic plateau of Monastier, which makes up part of the western border of the volcanic massif of Velay. The basaltic scarp presents a succession of embayments with benches at its foot (fig. 6). This scarp is dismantled with numerous topples of basaltic boulders. The rest of the hillslope presents a hummocky topography, disseminated basaltic boulders, reverse slopes and clearly marked convexities at its foot, which are considered as the bottom of the landslides. Three destructive boreholes were made and seismic refraction profiles constructed along the cross section AB (Poiraud et al., 2008) and morphometric measurements of 130 basaltic outcropped boulders. Earthworks revealed the geological section 'a', located along the cross section CD. This geological section was described and we cut samples for post-requisite dating. Boreholes and seismic profiles along cross section AB are consistent and show a typical profile with three layers:

16- The first one is 2-m thick and is composed of dark silt matrix material with numerous clasts. Seismic velocities are low, less than 1000 m/s. The thickness decreases from P1 to P2 and is less than 1 m at the downslope of the second borehole (P2). It disappears between P2 and P3. This layer is interpreted as a colluvial formation.

17- The second one appears at the downslope of P1. It is constituted by reworked material with clay and sand mixed with basaltic pebbles or small blocks (0-500 mm), or weathered basaltic boulders. Seismic velocities are high, greater than 1500 m/s. The thickness of this layer increases downslope, from 2 m (P1) to 15 m (P3). This is interpreted as the sliding mass. Unfortunately, the destructive boreholes do not allow the structure or microstructure of this mass to be observed.

18- The third one outcrops at the top of the cross section (P1) and is then located below the sliding mass. It is composed of alternating sandy or clayey beds. Basaltic elements are absent from this layer. Seismic velocities are medium, between 1000 m/s and 1500 m/s. The thickness is more than 30 m (interruption of borehole). This layer corresponds to the Oligocene substrate.

Fig. 6 – Geomorphological map the Monastier landslide complex.
Fig. 6 – Carte géomorphologique du complexe de glissements du Monastier.

Fig. 6 – Geomorphological map the Monastier landslide complex. Fig. 6 – Carte géomorphologique du complexe de glissements du Monastier.

1: outcrop basaltic boulder; 2; cross section; 3: convexity; 4: main scarp; 5: talus; 6: bench; 7: embankment; 8: topples; 9: hummocky topography; 10: geologic section; 11: seismic profile.
1 : bloc basaltique affleurant ; 2 : profil géologique ; 3 ; convexité ; 4 : escarpement principal ; 5 : talus ; 6 : replat ; 7 : petit talus sur versant ; 8 : basculement de corniche ; 9 : surface ondulée ; 10 : coupe de terrain ; 11 : profil de tomographie sismique.

19The seismic profile P1 (fig. 7) shows two high velocity zones interpreted as clastic formation or weathered basaltic boulders. We can clearly see the deformation that affects the formation between these two zones with the presence of an ancient depression and reverse slope, both of which were filled by subsequent sedimentation. This deformation is caused by a rotational movement of the upslope clastic formation.

20Concerning the boulders, we observe a strong variation in the volume, number and orientation from top to bottom of the slope affected by landslides (fig. 8). The boulders near the basaltic scarp are not fragmented (30% of all the 130 blocks are located closer than 150 m from the cornice and make up 70% of the apparent volume). Their position is subvertical or flat on the ground, but with an orientation consistent with the overall orientation of the scarp (N-NW). The orientation values are not so widely dispersed. Beyond 150 m, the number of basaltic boulders increases with the decrease in their respective volume (70% of the blocks make up 30% of the apparent volume). The orientation values are more widely dispersed and all the blocks are flat on the ground.

Fig. 7 – Tomographic profile P1.
Fig. 7 – Profil tomographique P1.

Fig. 7 – Tomographic profile P1. Fig. 7 – Profil tomographique P1.

The scale shows the speed probability (see G. Grandjean and S. Sage, 2004 for more details).
L’échelle indique une probabilité de vitesse (voir G. Grandjean et S. Sage, 2004 pour plus de détails).

Fig. 8 – Outcropped boulder orientation and boulder volume distribution.
Fig. 8 – Distribution des orientations relevées sur les blocs affleurants et des volumes mesurés.

Fig. 8 – Outcropped boulder orientation and boulder volume distribution. Fig. 8 – Distribution des orientations relevées sur les blocs affleurants et des volumes mesurés.

A: Outcropped boulder orientation distribution. 1: elevation contour; 2: scarp; 3: oriented boulder; 4: talus scree; 5: embankment; 6: landslide.
B: Outcropped boulder volume distribution. 1: elevation contour; 2: scarp; 3: landslide.
A : Distribution des orientations relevées sur les blocs affleurants 1 : courbe de niveau ; 2 : escarpement ; 3 : bloc orienté ; 4 : talus d’éboulis ; 5 : petit talus sur versant ; 6 : zone glissée.
B : Distribution des volumes mesurés sur les blocs affleurants. 1 : courbe de niveau ;
2 : escarpement ; 3 : zone glissée.

21Concerning the geological section 'a', we observe three major facts (fig. 9): (i) evident deformation of the deposit formation, with a tilting of strata of 15/20° upslope, characteristic of a rotational movement; (ii) the deformation event occurred after the last organic deposition; (iii) the filling of the post-landsliding depression with clastic material. This section is the downslope extension of an actual bench with organic clay. There are no elements from Tertiary sediment in the different formations described. This section shows a similar geometry to that of the seismic profile P1, i.e. a deformation of the layers by a rotational movement from upslope. The absence of Tertiary sediment in the formations is evidence of movements that affect only the formation derived from the scarp dismantling. The two cross sections (fig. 10) were built on the above information. The cross section AB (fig. 10) is more precise for the nature and the thickness of reworked material along the entire hillslope (borehole and geophysical). The cross section CD is complementary, as it clearly shows the rotational component. The sliding mass is not precisely represented because of the lack of boreholes, but we assume that the thickness and shape are similar to the slide body of cross section AB.

22The dismantling of the basaltic scarp is caused by the deformation and flowage of the underlying sandy-clay substratum (fig. 7 and fig. 9). The basaltic panels stand from the scarp with a rotational component. This movement creates a depression under the scarp and a convexity downslope of this depression. The rest of the landslide is made up of a mass of reworked material with sandy-clay sediment mixed with fractured basaltic elements with no clear shear surface. The further away from the scarp, the more blocks are fragmented and mixed with Tertiary sandy-clay sediment.

Fig. 9 – Section in the superficial formation derived from a rotational landslide.
Fig. 9 – Coupe dans les formations superficielles dérivées du glissement rotationnel.

Fig. 9 – Section in the superficial formation derived from a rotational landslide. Fig. 9 – Coupe dans les formations superficielles dérivées du glissement rotationnel.

This section corresponds to the downslope part of the landslide (see fig. 6 for location).
Cette coupe correspond à la partie amont du glissement (voir fig. 6 pour la localisation de la coupe).

Fig. 10 – Geologic interpretation of both cross section AB (A) and CD (B).
Fig. 10 – Interprétation géologique des deux profils AB (A) et CD (B).

Fig. 10 – Geologic interpretation of both cross section AB (A) and CD (B). Fig. 10 – Interprétation géologique des deux profils AB (A) et CD (B).

1: sliding mass with dismantled basaltic boulders; 2: post-landslide formation; 3: sliding cornice in a rotational component; 4: displaced basaltic panel; 5: basaltic plateau; 6: deformed Tertiary sediment; 7: granitic basement; 8: Tertiary sandy-clay sediment; 9: sliding mass in borehole; 10: bedrock in borehole.
1 : masse glissée avec blocs basaltiques démantelés ; 2 : formation superficielle post glissement ; 3 : corniche basaltique affaissée selon une composante rotationnelle ; 4 : panneau basaltique affaissée ; 5 : plateau basaltique ; 6 : sédiments tertiaires déformés et flués ; 7 : socle granitique ; 8 : sédiment tertiaire sablo-argileux en place ; 9 : masse glissée observée dans les forages ; 10 : terrain en place observé dans les forages.

Discussion

Pattern of landslides and controlling factors

23The pattern of landslide is correlated with the lithostructure and the main erosion axes constituted by the secondary valleys. Both the 'Sables de la Laussonne' formations and Quaternary sandy-clay sediment determines a sector highly prone to landsliding. Their mechanical properties are characterised by a low friction angle due to the presence of clay and low Atterberg limits. The 'Sables de la Laussonne' are locally known for their deformation and flowing capacities and their proneness to solifluction (Bouiller et al., 1978; Girod et al., 1979; Feybesse et al., 1998). This formation is rich in smectite and has a high water absorption capacity (Gabis, 1963; Larqué et Weber, 1978). The Quaternary formations are less well studied, except for the Villafranchian formation, locally called 'sables roux' and 'sables à mastodontes' (Bout, 1960; Ehrlich, 1967). This Villafranchian formation constitutes only one part of the Quaternary filling and does not concern the site of a landslide. E. Defive et al. (2005) give some information about the composition and stratification of one Quaternary sandy-clay sequence, but without granulometric precision or X-ray diffraction. Some technical reports of government geological services offer scattered values of mechanical properties, but not enough to characterise this material completely. However, from a statistical point of view, this sandy-clay formation is highly prone to landslide, like the 'Sables de la Laussonne' formation (Poiraud, 2007). Also, the sandy-clay Quaternary formation is interlocked in the Tertiary illitic sediment, which is totally impermeable. This configuration provides a potential slip plane at the contact between the two formations. The location of the clusters of both the Borne and Laussonne sectors indicates the importance of fluvial axes. These axes concentrate the Plio-Pleistocene uplift effect with a high incision of the valley and high slope values (Kieffer, 1962; Defive, 1996, 2008). These axes are the main control of dissection of both the basaltic plateau of Deves and the volcanic plateau of Velay and constitute incursions for erosion waves inside these plateaus. This process is well known in the Cévennes Massif, where the uplift effect was more expressive due to the proximity of the Rhône base level (Séranne et al., 2001). The example of the Coiron plateau is particularly remarkable (Bacconnier, 1924; Le-Griel, 1990).

Typology of landslides

24The typology of landslides gives information about the processes and mechanisms of the rupture (Varnes, 1984; Cruden and Varnes, 1996; Dikau et al., 1996). The St-Vidal landslide is a large landslide along the Borne valley. The anti-scarps, rotated floating panels, reverse slopes and upslope dip of displaced sediments are evidence of the rotational movements that affect the basaltic columns of the plateau border. The downslope part of the landslide presents characteristic forms of flowage. This landslide is fossil with superficial reactivations that affect the reworked material from the initial landslide phases. Concerning its dynamics, it is difficult to advance a firm hypothesis. The weathering difference between the downslope basaltic boulders and the upslope basaltic boulders could be evidence of successive rotational movements, with phases of retrogressive instability, but the morphologic profile of this landslide could assume the characteristics of a single rotational earthslide. This distinction needs further investigation. Similar morphological cases have been studied in the basin of Puy-en-Velay as the Ceyssac landslide (Bout, 1948) or in the Coiron Plateau, such as the Rochessauve landslide (Masurel, 1977), but with no clear definition of the type of landslide (a slumping type is proposed by both authors). The Collinabos landslide in Belgium (Van-den-Eeckhaut et al., 2007) presents similar morphology in a comparable morphostructural context. Researchers conclude this is a simple rotational earthslide with subsequent superficial deformation inside the landslide debris. The Monastier landslides have a different morphology, i.e. a relatively fresh scarp that delimits the border of the basaltic plateau, a bench zone located just below the scarp with reverse slopes and deformed basaltic clastic formations, and hummocky topography on the rest of the landslide with reworked material (basalt and sediment) and 'floating' boulders. The rotational movement is subsequent to the clastic formation deposition and is considered as a local reactivation of the retrogressive dynamics (scarp back-tilting). This clastic deposition, with rare silt matrix and no bedding disposition, is considered as a periglacial rubble-slope (Etlicher, 1977; Valadas, 1984; Etlicher, 1985; Bertran et al., 2004) and is disconnected from reworking processes that integrate Tertiary sediment. This rubble-slope is contemporaneous with or subsequent to the reworked sedimentary-basaltic formation. This last formation has a high seismic velocity and is disorganised. The facies of this formation and the H/L ratio of the landslides (0.15 to 0.21) are close to the values found by N. Vidal et al. (1996) in the Tertiary basin of Limagne (similar morphostructural context to the Tertiary basin of Puy-en-Velay). The authors conclude that there is a prevalence of post-eruptive debris avalanches that affect the volcanic relief of Limagne or slow-moving landslides that incorporate the volcanic and sedimentary material. Like for the St-Vidal landslide, we cannot draw any conclusion about the kinematics of these movements, but the typology of these landslides is similar to an earthflow or debris avalanche, i.e. movement with visco-plastic behaviour.

Geomorphological significance of landslides

25Landslides cover a large area and represent a large part of the hillslopes in the Tertiary basin of Puy-en-Velay. This proportion is greater inside catchments located on the right bank of the Loire (Miocene plateau of Velay) than catchments on the left bank (Plio-Pleistocene plateau of Deves). We observe a clear correlation between the widening of valleys, the mean slope of catchment and the density of old landslides. The valleys of the Miocene volcanic plateau of Velay are wide and have a more complex topography, with a mean slope between 8° and 9° and a standard deviation between 4° and 8°. All the hillslopes present symptoms of landsliding. By contrast, the valleys of the Pliocene plateau of Deves are narrow and have a more simple topography with a mean slope of 4° and a standard deviation of 4°. Old landslides are located only on particular sites. Dissection degrees of volcanic plateaus and landscape maturity are directly linked to the ages of those volcanic formations and are the expression of erosion work by the essential processes of mass wasting and stream development (Kieffer, 1962; Jefferson et al., 2010).

Conclusion

26The overall study of pattern and morphology of old landslides in the Tertiary basin of Puy-en-Velay allows the main controlling factor of location of those landslides to be determined, i.e. the lithology and the maturity of valleys. Landslides are linked to stream development (retrogressive dynamics) and are a major process of basaltic scarp back-tilting and valley widening. The study case of two sites provides information about the typology of landslides. Movements seem to have visco-plastic behaviour (H/L ratio) and present geometry like earthslides or earthflows with an upslope rotational component. Unfortunately, we cannot draw any conclusion about the kinematics or timing of these landslides, but slow and continuous movements seem to be a more reasonable assumption than rapid and paroxysmal events. Superficial formations derived from landslides cover a large area in the basin and are as important as pure periglacial formations ('head' type). These formations are heterometric, intensely reworked with strong incorporation of volcanic elements with Tertiary sediments and thicknesses ranging from 1-2 m to more than 15 m. They are subject to surficial reactivation today and are highly prone to landslide. This study is still incomplete and requires additional investigations to better characterise the kinematics of landslides and their involvement in the definition of basaltic scarp back-tilting pattern and, more generally, on landscape evolution. Palaeoenvironmental reconstruction is currently being engaged in the Laussonne valley with palynological analyses and dating of relict landslides. This study will allow the link between climate and hillslope instability and the pace of this phase of hillslope activity to be determined.

We thank the 'Natural Hazard Service' of BRGM for its earlier involvement in the study of the geophysical characteristics of the Monastier landslide. We thank David Jarman and two other anonymous referees for spending time reviewing the first draft of this article and for their helpful remarks.

Haut de page

Bibliographie

Astrade L., Bravard J.-P., Landon N. (1998) – Mouvements de masse et dynamique d'un géosystème alpestre : étude dendrogéomorphologique de 2 sites de la vallée de Boulc (Diois, France). Géographie physique et Quaternaire 52-2, 1-13

Bacconnier L. (1924) – Le Coirons (Vivarais). Revue de Géographie Alpine, 12-2, 247-335

Bertran P., Francou B., Texier J.-P. (2004) – Eboulisation, éboulements. Dépôts de pente continentaux, dynamique et faciès. Quaternaire, Hors série, 29-43.

Bouiller R., Couturié J.-P., Kornprobst J., Kienast J.-R., Larneyre J., Vilminot J.-C., Boivin P., Gourgaud A. (1978)Carte géologique de la France au 1/50 000 : feuille de Cayres. Editions BRGM, Orléans.

Bout P. (1948) – L’érosion des sols en Haute-Loire. Bulletin historique, scientifique, littéraire, artistique et agricole illustré - Société scientifique de Haute-Loire, XXVIII, 7-20.

Bout P. (1960)Le Villafranchien du Velay et du bassin hydrographique moyen et supérieur de l’Allier : corrélations françaises et européennes. Thèse de doctorat, université de Paris, Imprimerie Jeanne d’Arc, le Puy, 344 p.

Bout P. (1974) – Le périglaciaire du Massif Central de la France. Revue d’Auvergne, 88-1, 49-75.

Brunsden D. (2001) – A critical assessment of the sensitivity concept in geomorphology. Catena 42, 99-123.

Brunsden D., Thornes J.B. (1979) – Landscape sensitivity and change. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers 4, 463-484.

Chang J.C., Slaymaker O. (2002) – Frequency and spatial distribution of landslides in a mountainous drainage basin : Western Foothills, Taiwan. Catena 46, 285-307.

Cruden D.M., Varnes D.J. (1996) – Landslide types and processes. Landslides Investigation and Mitigation, Special Report 247, Transportation Research Board, Washington 36-75.

Dapples F. (2002)Instabilités de terrain dans les Préalpes fribourgeoises (Suisse) au cours du Tardiglaciaire et de l’Holocène : influence des changements climatiques, des fluctuations de la végétation et de l’activité humaine. Thèse de doctorat, université de Fribourg, 158 p.

Defive E. (1996)L’encaissement du réseau hydrographique dans le bassin supérieur de la Loire - contribution à l’étude des rythmes d’évolution géomorphologique en moyenne montagne volcanisée. Thèse de doctorat, université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), 551 p.

Defive E. (2008) – Facteurs de continuité et de disjonction spatio-temporelle des évolutions aux échelles moyennes en Haute-Loite et Haut-Allier. Bulletin de l’Association de Géographes Français, 2, 237-244.

Defive E., Gauthier A., Pastre J.-F. (2005) – L’évolution plio-quaternaire du bassin du Puy (Massif central, France) : rythmes morphosédimentaires et volcanisme. Quaternaire 16-3, 177-190.

Dikau R., Brunsden D., Schrott L., Ibsen M. (1996)Landslide recognition: identification, movement and causes. Wiley, Chichester, 251 p.

Dominguez-Cuesta M.J., Jimenez-Sanchez M., Berrezueta E. (2007) – Landslides in the Central Coalfield (Cantabrian Mountains, NW Spain): Geomorphological features, conditioning factors and methodological implications in susceptibility assessment. Geomorphology 89, 358-369.

Ehrlich A. (1967) – Etude de quelques gisements diatomifères villafranchiens du bassin du Puy. Bulletin de l’association française pour l’étude du Quaternaire, 4-4, 293-304.

Etlicher B. (1977) – Premières remarques sur les formations de pente périglaciaires en Forez. Revue de Géographie de Lyon, 52-1, 71-88.

Etlicher B. (1985) – Corrélations glaciaire-périglaciaire dans l’Est du Massif central français. Bulletin de l’association française pour l’étude du Quaternaire, 22-2-3, 117-124.

Feybesse J.-L., Turland M., Nehlig P., Capdevila R., Alsac C., Dagain J., Mergoil J., Werth F. (1998)Carte géologique de la France au 1/50 000 : feuille d’Yssingeaux. Editions BRGM, Orléans.

Gabis V. (1963) – Etude minéralogique et géochimique de la série sédimentaire oligocène du Velay. Bulletin de la Société française de Minéralogie et Cristallographie, LXXXVI, 315-354.

Girod M., Bouiller R., Weber F., Larqué P., Giot D. (1979)Carte géologique de la France au 1/50 000 : feuille du Puy-en-Velay. Editions BRGM, Orléans.

Grandjean G., Sage S. (2004) – JaTS: a fully portable seismic tomography software based on Fresnel wavepaths and a probabilistic reconstruction approach. Computers & Geosciences 30, 925-935.

Jefferson A., Grant G.E., Lewis S.L., Lancaster S.T. (2010) – Coevolution of hydrology and topography on a basalt landscape in the Oregon Cascade Range, USA. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 35, 803-816.

Kieffer G. (1962)Un essai de reconstitution de l’évolution du relief dans les bassins volcanisés du Massif Central et sur leurs bordures par les enseignements des coulées de lave. Thèse de doctorat, université Blaise-Pascal (Clermont-Ferrand 2), 302 p.

Larqué P., Weber F. (1978) – Séquences sédimentaires et lithostratigraphie de la série paléogène du Velay. Sciences Géologiques, 31-4, 151-155.

Le-Griel A. (1990) – L’évolution géomorphologique du massif central français - essai sur la genèse d’un relief. Thèse d’Etat, université Lyon 2, 3 tomes, 659 p.

Martino S., Moscatelli M., Scarascia-Mugnozza G. (2004) – Quaternary mass movements controlled by a structurally complex setting in the central Apennines (Italy). Engineering Geology 72, 33-55.

Masurel Y. (1977) – Les glissements de terrain de Rochessauve, près de Privas (Ardèche). Revue de Géographie Alpine, 65-2, 213-219.

Michon L. (2000)Dynamique de l’extension continentale - Application au Rift Ouest-Européen par l’étude de la province du Massif Central. Thèse de doctorat, université Blaise-Pascal (Clermont-Ferrand 2), 266 p.

Moeyersons J., Van-Den-Eeckhaut M., Nyssen J., Gebreyohannes T., Van-de-Waum J., Hofmeister J., Poesen J., Deckers J., Mitiku H. (2008) – Mass movement mapping for geomorphological understanding and sustainable development: Tigray, Ethiopia. Catena 75, 45-54.

Poiraud A. (2007) – Instabilité des versants dans le bassin tertiaire du Puy-en-Velay (Massif central, France) : facteurs de contrôle et cartographie des susceptibilités. Mémoire de master, université Blaise-Pascal (Clermont-Ferrand 2), 94 p.

Poiraud A., Bernardie S., Defive E., Bitri A., Grandjean G. (2008)Premiers résultats sur le glissement hérité du Monastier-sur-Gazeille (Massif central, France). Rapport final BRGM/RP-56679-FR, 46 p.

Raynal J.-P. (1986) – Paléoenvironnements et chronostratigraphie du paléolithique moyen dans le Massif Central français – implications culturelles. Colloque international « L’Homme de Néandertal », Liège, volume 2 (http://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00004233/fr/).

Raynal J.-P. (1988a) – Les 150 derniers millénaires dans le Bassin du Puy : La séquence des Rivaux à Espaly (Haute-Loire). Société préhistorique française, séance décentralisée, « Les peuplements paléolithiques du Massif central », Le Puy-en-Velay, 8-9 octobre (http://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00004453/fr/).

Raynal J.-P. (1988b) – Une longue séquence de grotte en contexte basanitique : Le Rond du Barry à Sinzelles (Polignac, Haute-Loire). Société préhistorique française, séance décentralisée, « Les peuplements paléolithiques du Massif central », Le Puy-en-Velay, 8-9 octobre (http://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00004453/fr/).

Raynal J.-P., Vernet G., Paquereau M.-M., Papy G. (2001) – Sédiments, tephras et pollens dans le complexe de Solheilhac (Blanzac, Haute-Loire). Tephras, 1, 191-209.

Scanvic J.-Y., Girault F., Rouzeau O. (1991)Cartographie géologique et structurale en Velay (France) : observations préliminaires par les techniques et les méthodes de télédétection. Rapport BRGM, 91 SGN R 32699, 42 p.

Schmidt K.H., Beyer I. (2002) – High-magnitude landslide events on a limestone-scarp in central Germany: morphometric characteristics and climatic controls. Geomorphology 49, 323-342.

Séranne M., Camus H., Lucazeau F., Barbarand J., Quinif Y. (2001) – Surrection et érosion polyphasées de la bordure cévenole. Un exemple de morphogenèse lente. Bulletin de la société géologique de France, 173, 97-112.

Thomas M.F. (2001) – Landscape sensitivity in time and space : an introduction. Catena 42, 83-98.

Valadas B. (1984)Les Hautes terres du Massif Central français : contribution à l’étude des morphodynamiques récentes sur versants cristallins et volcaniques. Thèse de doctorat, université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), 927 p.

Van-den-Eeckhaut M., Verstraeten G., Poesen J. (2007) – Morphology and internal structure of a dormant landslide in a hilly area: The Collinabos landslide (Belgium). Geomorphology 89, 258-273.

Van-Vliet-Lanoë B., Hallégouët B. (1998)Extension du pergélisol en France au dernier maximum glaciaire (20 000 ans BP). ANDRA Cartographie, ANDRA-CNF-INQUA.

Varnes D.J. (1984) – Landslide hazard zonation: A review of principles and practice. Natural Hazards 3, 63.

Vidal N., De-Goër-de-Herve A., Camus G. (1996) – Déstabilisation de reliefs d’érosion en terrain volcanique. Exemples pris dans le Massif Central français. Quaternaire 7-2-3, 117-127.

Haut de page

Annexe

Version française abrégée

Le bassin du Puy-en-Velay est marqué par la présence de nombreux glissements de terrain anciens, reliques de périodes de morphogénèse plus intenses qu’aujourd’hui. L’étude de la répartition spatiale, des facteurs de cette répartition et de la morphologie de ces anciens glissements apporte des enseignements quant au rôle important joué par ces instabilités sur l’évolution des vallées et sur les mécanismes de ces instabilités.

Concernant la répartition spatiale des glissements ainsi que la distribution de quelques valeurs morphométriques, deux secteurs se différencient, à la fois dans l’espace mais également en terme morphométrique. Au nord-ouest, le long de la vallée de la Borne, un premier secteur est composé essentiellement de glissements situés à une altitude moyenne inférieure à l’altitude moyenne du bassin et ayant une dénivelée inférieure à 150 m et une longueur inférieure à 800 m. Les glissements se localisent majoritairement sur le faciès argilo-sableux des formations quaternaires, lesquelles sont emboîtées dans le sédimentaire tertiaire. Dans le second secteur, situé au sud-est du bassin du Puy, les glissements sont plus élevés en altitude, plus amples (dénivelé et longueur supérieurs au premier secteur) mais également plus variés. Ils sont localisés exclusivement sur la série oligocène, sablo-argileuse, localement appelée « Sables de la Laussonne ». Si les différences morphométriques sont évidentes entre les deux secteurs, le rapport H/D (angle de friction apparent) y est sensiblement le même. Les glissements occupent donc quasiment tout l’espace entre le sommet de la corniche basaltique (limite des plateaux volcaniques recouvrant les terrains sédimentaires) et les cours d’eau, éléments majeurs d’incision. La différence d’amplitude des glissements entre les deux secteurs est intimement liée à l’âge des formations volcaniques qui marquent le stade initial du cycle d’érosion et dont dépend le calibre des vallées.

Deux glissements ont été étudiés en détail. Le glissement de St-Vidal est situé dans le secteur de la Borne et présente tous les signes d’un glissement complexe. La partie amont du glissement présente de nettes figures de glissement rotationnel affectant le rebord du plateau basaltique. La partie aval est topographiquement plus confuse mais est marquée par une très forte densité de matériaux basaltiques fragmentés et remaniés, incorporés dans une matrice argilo-sableuse dérivée des formations quaternaires en place. La différence d’altération entre les éléments basaltiques amont et aval fait envisager un glissement en plusieurs phases, causant le recul progressif de la corniche basaltique. Le complexe de glissements du Monastier est situé dans la zone des « Sables de la Laussonne ». Ce complexe a été étudié par analyse morphologique, sondages géologiques et tomographie sismique. L’existence de composantes rotationnelles amont est liée à la déformation et au fluage des terrains sédimentaires sous-jacents à la bordure basaltique et à la présence de langues aval remaniant les éléments issus du démantèlement de la corniche basaltique. Dans les deux cas, nous sommes en présence de glissements complexes, a priori lents, avec une composante amont clairement rotationnelle, liée à la déformation du substrat plus qu’à sa rupture, et une partie aval où les matériaux sont très mélangés, mise en place par des processus de fluage lent. Le rapport H/D de ces glissements amène à envisager des processus viscoplastiques et à les rattacher morphologiquement aux glissements-coulées lents de type earthflow.

En définitive, la répartition spatiale des glissements anciens du Puy est guidée par la lithologie, notamment les formations sablo-argileuses et argilo-sableuses de l’Oligocène et du Quaternaire, connues pour leurs caractéristiques mécaniques propices aux ruptures et déformations. Leur morphométrie d’ensemble est corrélée à l’âge des plateaux volcaniques bordiers. Il s’agit de glissements complexes de type earthflow, a priori lents. Nous ne pouvons malheureusement pas conclure quant aux rythmes de déclenchement et d’évolution de ces glissements dans le temps et donc à la simultanéité des processus caractérisant les glissements-coulées. Ces glissements représentent un élément moteur du recul des bordures de plateaux volcaniques et de l’élargissement des vallées. Ils constituent donc un des éléments majeurs d’évolution morphogénique post-volcanisme dans le bassin du Puy.

Haut de page

Table des illustrations

Titre Fig. 1 – Simplified geological map of tertiary basin of Puy-en-velay. Fig. 1 – Carte géologique simplifiée du bassin tertiaire de Puy-en-Velay.
Légende 1: study area; 2: main river; 3: elevation point; 4: city; 5: Plio-Pleistocene volcanism; 6: Mio-Pliocene volcanism; 7: Tertiary and Quaternary sediments; 8: crystalline basement.1 : zone d’étude ; 2 : rivières principales ; 3 : côte d’altitude ; 4 : villes ; 5 : volcanisme plio-pléistocène ; 6 : volcanisme mio-pliocène ; 7 : sédiments tertiaires et quaternaires ; 8 : socle cristallin.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/9455/img-1.png
Fichier image/png, 723k
Titre Fig. 2 – Location of relict landslides in their geological context. Fig. 2 – Localisation des glissements anciens dans leur contexte géologique.
Légende 1: relict landslide; 2: city; 3: major stream; 4: major fault; 5: supposed fault; 6: Mio-Pliocene volcanism; 7: Plio-Pleistocene volcanism; 8: sedimentary formations; 9: crystalline basement.1 : glissement ancien ; 2 : ville ; 3 : cours d’eau principaux ; 4 : faille majeure ; 5 : faille supposée ; 6 : volcanisme mio-pliocène ; 7 : volcanisme plio-pléistocène ; 8 : formations sédimentaires ; 9 : socle cristallin.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/9455/img-2.png
Fichier image/png, 547k
Titre Fig. 3 – Elevation distribution and vertical rise of each fossil landslide.Fig. 3 – Altitude et dénivelé de chaque glissement de terrain.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/9455/img-3.png
Fichier image/png, 639k
Titre Fig. 4 – Height/length distribution of landslides. Fig. 4 – Distribution des glissements selon leur longueur et leur dénivelée.
Légende Bold label corresponds to landslides from Borne sector and italic label corresponds to landslides from Laussonne sector.Les labels en gras correspondent aux glissements du secteur de Borne tandis que les labels en italique correspondent aux glissements du secteur de Laussonne.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/9455/img-4.png
Fichier image/png, 156k
Titre Fig. 5 – Geomorphological maps and cross section of St-Vidal landslide. Fig. 5 – Cartes géomorphologiques et coupe géologique du glissement de St-Vidal.
Légende A: Geomorphological maps. 1: location of picture 2; 2: sedimentary-volcanic formations outcrop; 3: superficial borehole; 4: main scarp of little rotational landslide; 5: secondary scarp of the main landslide; 6: anti-scarp; 7: convexity; 8: main scarp of St-Vidal landslide; 9: eroded river border; 10: reverse slope; 11: pound; 12: superficial rotational landslide; 13: talus scree; 14: alluvial formation; 15: cross section; 16: elevation contour.B: Geological cross section AB of the landslide. Pictures ph1 and ph2 appear on the cross section. 1: basaltic plateau; 2: talus scree; 3: “floating” basaltic panels; 4: dismantled panels; 5: “floating” boulders; 6: deformed Quaternary and Tertiary sediment; 7; alluvial formation; 8; colluvial formation. A : Carte géomorphologique. 1 : localisation de la photo 2 ; 2 : affleurement de formation volcano-sédimentaire ; 3 : sondage superficiel ; 4 : escarpement principal du glissement rotationnel superficiel ; 5 : escarpement secondaire du glissement principal ; 6 : contre-escarpement ; 7 : convexité ; 8 : escarpement principal du glissement de St-Vidal ; 9 : berge érodée ; 10 : contre-pente ; 11 ; marécage ; 12 : glissement rotationnel superficiel ; 13 : talus d’éboulis ; 14 : terrasse alluviale ; 15 : coupe géologique ; 16 : courbes de niveau.B : Coupe géologique AB du glissement. Les photos ph1 et ph2 sont indiquées sur la coupe. 1 : plateau basaltique ; 2 : talus d’éboulis ; 3 : panneau basaltique flué ; 4 : panneau disloqué ; 5 : blocs basaltiques flués dans la masse ; 6 : matériaux sédimentaires tertiaires et quaternaires déformés ; 7 : formation alluviale ; 8 : formation colluviale.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/9455/img-5.png
Fichier image/png, 991k
Titre Fig. 6 – Geomorphological map the Monastier landslide complex. Fig. 6 – Carte géomorphologique du complexe de glissements du Monastier.
Légende 1: outcrop basaltic boulder; 2; cross section; 3: convexity; 4: main scarp; 5: talus; 6: bench; 7: embankment; 8: topples; 9: hummocky topography; 10: geologic section; 11: seismic profile.1 : bloc basaltique affleurant ; 2 : profil géologique ; 3 ; convexité ; 4 : escarpement principal ; 5 : talus ; 6 : replat ; 7 : petit talus sur versant ; 8 : basculement de corniche ; 9 : surface ondulée ; 10 : coupe de terrain ; 11 : profil de tomographie sismique.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/9455/img-6.png
Fichier image/png, 365k
Titre Fig. 7 – Tomographic profile P1. Fig. 7 – Profil tomographique P1.
Légende The scale shows the speed probability (see G. Grandjean and S. Sage, 2004 for more details).L’échelle indique une probabilité de vitesse (voir G. Grandjean et S. Sage, 2004 pour plus de détails).
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/9455/img-7.png
Fichier image/png, 154k
Titre Fig. 8 – Outcropped boulder orientation and boulder volume distribution. Fig. 8 – Distribution des orientations relevées sur les blocs affleurants et des volumes mesurés.
Légende A: Outcropped boulder orientation distribution. 1: elevation contour; 2: scarp; 3: oriented boulder; 4: talus scree; 5: embankment; 6: landslide.B: Outcropped boulder volume distribution. 1: elevation contour; 2: scarp; 3: landslide.A : Distribution des orientations relevées sur les blocs affleurants 1 : courbe de niveau ; 2 : escarpement ; 3 : bloc orienté ; 4 : talus d’éboulis ; 5 : petit talus sur versant ; 6 : zone glissée.B : Distribution des volumes mesurés sur les blocs affleurants. 1 : courbe de niveau ; 2 : escarpement ; 3 : zone glissée.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/9455/img-8.png
Fichier image/png, 400k
Titre Fig. 9 – Section in the superficial formation derived from a rotational landslide. Fig. 9 – Coupe dans les formations superficielles dérivées du glissement rotationnel.
Légende This section corresponds to the downslope part of the landslide (see fig. 6 for location).Cette coupe correspond à la partie amont du glissement (voir fig. 6 pour la localisation de la coupe).
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/9455/img-9.png
Fichier image/png, 508k
Titre Fig. 10 – Geologic interpretation of both cross section AB (A) and CD (B). Fig. 10 – Interprétation géologique des deux profils AB (A) et CD (B).
Légende 1: sliding mass with dismantled basaltic boulders; 2: post-landslide formation; 3: sliding cornice in a rotational component; 4: displaced basaltic panel; 5: basaltic plateau; 6: deformed Tertiary sediment; 7: granitic basement; 8: Tertiary sandy-clay sediment; 9: sliding mass in borehole; 10: bedrock in borehole.1 : masse glissée avec blocs basaltiques démantelés ; 2 : formation superficielle post glissement ; 3 : corniche basaltique affaissée selon une composante rotationnelle ; 4 : panneau basaltique affaissée ; 5 : plateau basaltique ; 6 : sédiments tertiaires déformés et flués ; 7 : socle granitique ; 8 : sédiment tertiaire sablo-argileux en place ; 9 : masse glissée observée dans les forages ; 10 : terrain en place observé dans les forages.
URL http://geomorphologie.revues.org/docannexe/image/9455/img-10.png
Fichier image/png, 75k
Haut de page

Pour citer cet article

Référence papier

Alexandre Poiraud et Emmanuelle Defive, « Morphology and geomorphological significance of relict landslides in the Tertiary basin of Puy-en-Velay (Massif Central, France) », Géomorphologie : relief, processus, environnement, vol. 17 - n° 3 | 2011, 247-260.

Référence électronique

Alexandre Poiraud et Emmanuelle Defive, « Morphology and geomorphological significance of relict landslides in the Tertiary basin of Puy-en-Velay (Massif Central, France) », Géomorphologie : relief, processus, environnement [En ligne], vol. 17 - n° 3 | 2011, mis en ligne le 15 septembre 2013, consulté le 20 août 2017. URL : http://geomorphologie.revues.org/9455 ; DOI : 10.4000/geomorphologie.9455

Haut de page

Auteurs

Alexandre Poiraud

Clermont Université - Université Blaise Pascal - GEOLAB - Maison des Sciences de l’Homme - BP 10448 - F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand. CNRS - GEOLAB-Laboratoire de Géographie Physique et Environnementale - F-63057 Clermont-Ferrand (apoiraud@yahoo.fr)

Emmanuelle Defive

Clermont Université - Université Blaise Pascal - GEOLAB - Maison des Sciences de l’Homme - BP 10448 - F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand. CNRS - GEOLAB-Laboratoire de Géographie Physique et Environnementale - F-63057 Clermont-Ferrand (edefive@aol.com)

Haut de page

Droits d’auteur

© Groupe français de géomorphologie

Haut de page
  • Logo CNRS - Institut des sciences humaines et sociales
  • Logo Groupe français de géomorphologie
  • Revues.org